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NEWS
March 10, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the predawn darkness, the floodlit cathedral looms like a snow-covered mountain over this poor neighborhood. Inside, 15,000 faithful have been waiting for two hours, but they show no sign of fatigue. They are expecting their Moses. Suddenly, a pudgy preacher in a brown suit strides up the marble stairs to the altar, a golden tree trunk. Thousands of worshipers break into chest-heaving sobs. Others furiously wave white handkerchiefs and cry "Glory to Christ!" Samuel Joaquin has arrived.
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NEWS
July 12, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JOSEPH TREVINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a sweltering evening, the flower of Yucatan womanhood is packed into a local gymnasium, dressed in Sunday-best linen and sensible pantsuits. Schoolteachers. Fresh-scrubbed college students. Moms like Maria Esther Ortega, 45, a staunch Catholic with four children. It is a historic moment for Merida, and they know it. "Yes, we did it!" thunder the 2,041 women. "Yes, we did it!" Moments later, the long-anticipated show begins. Weeks of controversy over morality and women's rights fade away.
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NEWS
July 12, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JOSEPH TREVINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a sweltering evening, the flower of Yucatan womanhood is packed into a local gymnasium, dressed in Sunday-best linen and sensible pantsuits. Schoolteachers. Fresh-scrubbed college students. Moms like Maria Esther Ortega, 45, a staunch Catholic with four children. It is a historic moment for Merida, and they know it. "Yes, we did it!" thunder the 2,041 women. "Yes, we did it!" Moments later, the long-anticipated show begins. Weeks of controversy over morality and women's rights fade away.
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The brown-skinned Virgin of Guadalupe has long inspired Mexicans to make devout pilgrimages--on foot, by bicycle and even crawling on their knees for the last hundred yards--to the immense basilica that honors her image.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The religious highlight of the opening day of Pope John Paul II's current visit to Mexico was a ceremony confirming centuries of reverence for Juan Diego, a 16th-Century Indian peasant, as Mary's messenger. Juan Diego and four other Mexican Catholics were beatified Sunday at the National Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe on the outskirts of Mexico City.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two decades, Sebastian Diaz vividly recalls his father's last visit to his modest home in the hills of Chiapas, Mexico's most southern state. The elder Diaz stood in the door of the one-room, thatch-roofed adobe, with a stack of matches clearly visible behind him. "We hear you changed religions," he told his son. "It would be better if you did not wake up here tomorrow."
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | LAURIE BECKLUND and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Families of the 12 people who died in a spiritualist prayer meeting gone awry held wakes for their dead Saturday, disbelieving and angry at the official finding that the victims died of accidental asphyxiation brought on by a malfunctioning butane lantern. "Put down that justice needs to be done here, that someone is to blame and that somehow those of us who did not die will find an answer," said Fidel Mondragon, 61, of East Los Angeles, whose daughter, son-in-law and two grandchildren died.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Using unusually strong language, Catholic bishops in California and northwestern Mexico have accused Mormons, Seventh-day Adventists and other religious groups of "unfair and coercive practices" to lure Latinos away from their Roman Catholic heritage. The charges of proselytizing Latinos "at any cost" drew denials this week from officials of the Adventist and Mormon churches--denominations that have not been named in previous Catholic documents dealing with steady losses of Latino Catholics. L.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The arrival of Pope John Paul II in Mexico on Friday was serenaded by the jingles and heralded by the billboards of 25 official corporate sponsors and other company promotion campaigns--including postage-stamp-sized papal pictures in bags of Sabritas potato chips. Along the Boulevard of Mysteries, where the 14 Stations of the Cross are spaced over a mile-long sidewalk leading to the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe, posters announced "Mexico: Always Faithful."
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
As they have for centuries, hundreds of thousands of Mexicans made their annual pilgrimage to the Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe earlier this month, paying homage to their patron with painful penance and Indian dances. Women wrapped in shawls crawled on their knees across the vast stone plaza of the church, and men danced in the masks and plumed headdresses handed down through generations.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The arrival of Pope John Paul II in Mexico on Friday was serenaded by the jingles and heralded by the billboards of 25 official corporate sponsors and other company promotion campaigns--including postage-stamp-sized papal pictures in bags of Sabritas potato chips. Along the Boulevard of Mysteries, where the 14 Stations of the Cross are spaced over a mile-long sidewalk leading to the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe, posters announced "Mexico: Always Faithful."
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago this week, the Latin American bishops of an ideologically divided church gathered in Mexico to hear their new pope, on his first mission abroad, proclaim a message that was to shape the politics of his reign and those of the world's most Roman Catholic region. The church's "preferential love for the poor," said Pope John Paul II, must not mean hatred or exclusion of the rich.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bold declaration of Roman Catholic faith is etched in white stones on a hillside above this central Mexican town and visible for miles beyond: "Long Live Mary, Immaculate Queen!" On a humble side street in the town below, peasant women with their husbands and children in tow are streaming in and out of the brightly painted new Mexfam clinic, a national provider of family health and birth control.
NEWS
March 10, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the predawn darkness, the floodlit cathedral looms like a snow-covered mountain over this poor neighborhood. Inside, 15,000 faithful have been waiting for two hours, but they show no sign of fatigue. They are expecting their Moses. Suddenly, a pudgy preacher in a brown suit strides up the marble stairs to the altar, a golden tree trunk. Thousands of worshipers break into chest-heaving sobs. Others furiously wave white handkerchiefs and cry "Glory to Christ!" Samuel Joaquin has arrived.
NEWS
June 13, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Word spread fast after a subway worker's child noticed last week that a water stain on the floor of Mexico City's bustling Hidalgo Metro station bore a miraculous likeness to the nation's most powerful religious symbol, the beloved Virgin Mary of Guadalupe. Thousands of Mexico's faithful have since flocked to see the subway tile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1995 | From Religion News Service
In Mexico, her image graces churches and cantinas, buses and taxis, union halls and corporate offices. She is heralded by the Bookies, a popular Mexican band, and by the country's most famous poets. The Zapatista rebels in Chiapas display her on banners, and the wealthy build altars in her honor in their lavish homes.
NEWS
December 22, 1990 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 45-year-old Tijuana mother has become the 13th person to die of asphyxiation from carbon monoxide gas during a religious ceremony last week at an unventilated home, authorities said. The victim, Consuelo Ponce Ramirez, a mother of eight, died in her hospital bed at 4 a.m. Thursday, said Dr. Ariel Perez Munoz, director of the Social Security Clinic 20, where she and other survivors were being treated. She had been in a coma for a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While a reported encounter between an Indian peasant and the Virgin Mary inspired the religious art now on display at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, visitors Saturday also had culture, homeland and marriage on their minds. "We made a promise to ourselves that--because our families were against the marriage--if we got married, it would be at the basilica," said Hortencia R. Cervantes, who was married almost 47 years ago to the day in Mexico City's prominent Basilica de Guadalupe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While a reported encounter between an Indian peasant and the Virgin Mary inspired the religious art now on display at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, visitors Saturday also had culture, homeland and marriage on their minds. "We made a promise to ourselves that--because our families were against the marriage--if we got married, it would be at the basilica," said Hortencia R. Cervantes, who was married almost 47 years ago to the day in Mexico City's prominent Basilica de Guadalupe.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two decades, Sebastian Diaz vividly recalls his father's last visit to his modest home in the hills of Chiapas, Mexico's most southern state. The elder Diaz stood in the door of the one-room, thatch-roofed adobe, with a stack of matches clearly visible behind him. "We hear you changed religions," he told his son. "It would be better if you did not wake up here tomorrow."
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