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NEWS
April 13, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It's one of the greatest stories ever told: A baby is found in a basket adrift in the Egyptian Nile and is adopted into the pharaoh's household. He grows up as Moses, rediscovers his roots and leads his enslaved Israelite brethren to freedom after God sends down 10 plagues against Egypt and parts the Red Sea to allow them to escape. They wander for 40 years in the wilderness and, under the leadership of Joshua, conquer the land of Canaan to enter their promised land.
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NEWS
April 13, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It's one of the greatest stories ever told: A baby is found in a basket adrift in the Egyptian Nile and is adopted into the pharaoh's household. He grows up as Moses, rediscovers his roots and leads his enslaved Israelite brethren to freedom after God sends down 10 plagues against Egypt and parts the Red Sea to allow them to escape. They wander for 40 years in the wilderness and, under the leadership of Joshua, conquer the land of Canaan to enter their promised land.
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NEWS
February 22, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Businessman Asraf Shenaway stood outside his red-and-gold draped pavilion, its colored lights beckoning along the sidewalk of a busy thoroughfare in this frenetic city near the Great Pyramids. Well-dressed retainers quietly bid passersby to step inside for a few minutes and break their Ramadan fast at sunset. Inside, two long wooden tables were laden with a simple meal--bread, beans, chicken and syrupy pastries--donated by Shenaway and prepared in his home by his chef.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A merchant family in central Egypt received a startling handwritten note, delivered by strangers. "Ten thousand pounds by tomorrow. We will not accept one piaster less," warned the Arabic missive, signed by "The Islamic Group." "If you bring the money one day late, it will be 15,000 pounds. If you do not bring it then, we will not accept even millions. . . . And you know the penalty."
NEWS
February 11, 1991
"Americans should not be deceived by talk that the Gulf War is a confrontation between Islam and the West. Those who portray it as such want us to believe that no political solution is possible, justifying the use of any amount of force by the West. That Islam is the 'religion of the sword' is a common Western stereotype, as if believers simply read the Koran and immediately seek battle.
NEWS
February 20, 1991
Several non-military factors may influence any decision on starting a land war. For instance, a moonless or half-moon night and high tide would be favorable elements for an amphibious landing. However, religious holidays such as the Muslim holy month of Ramadan might delay action by either side. But Muslim scholars also consider the 10th day of Ramadan to be a favorable day for attack because Mohammed, the prophet, emerged victorious from battle on that day.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As hundreds of barefoot men knelt on their woven prayer mats, the sheik at Al Hussein mosque cast doubt on Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's faith in Islam. "Is it considered a part of Islam that one pious believer attacks another? Is a true believer one who violates the home of another and violates his rights?" he asked rhetorically.
NEWS
August 24, 1987 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
While U.S. warships sailing these waters cloak their movements in secrecy, their high-tech sensors and shipboard computers on the alert, an armada of old-fashioned wooden dhows crosses the Strait of Hormuz daily, plying a trade route used for centuries by the merchants of Dubai and Iran. Once, these sleek, crescent-shaped vessels carried spices and silks, but now their cargoes are more likely to be color television sets, radios and disposable diapers.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A merchant family in central Egypt received a startling handwritten note, delivered by strangers. "Ten thousand pounds by tomorrow. We will not accept one piaster less," warned the Arabic missive, signed by "The Islamic Group." "If you bring the money one day late, it will be 15,000 pounds. If you do not bring it then, we will not accept even millions. . . . And you know the penalty."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in more than 1,500 years, leaders of all major churches of the Middle East gathered this week to review the problems and prospects of Christians in the region where their religion was born. Not since the Council of Chalcedon in the year 451 outside Constantinople (now Istanbul) have the prelates of the multitude of Christian churches based in the Middle East sat together.
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Businessman Asraf Shenaway stood outside his red-and-gold draped pavilion, its colored lights beckoning along the sidewalk of a busy thoroughfare in this frenetic city near the Great Pyramids. Well-dressed retainers quietly bid passersby to step inside for a few minutes and break their Ramadan fast at sunset. Inside, two long wooden tables were laden with a simple meal--bread, beans, chicken and syrupy pastries--donated by Shenaway and prepared in his home by his chef.
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tour began in an ancient donkey stable, out a rear arch marked "Secret Passageway" and down an ancient stairway 800 years into the past.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Saddam Hussein said Iraqis could leave their country for only the second time in more than 10 years of war, the Christians were at the head of the line. An estimated 30,000 Iraqis--a high percentage of them Christians--are now filling hotels and apartments here in the Jordanian capital. Many spend their days at Western consulates, hoping for a visa that will let them leave the Middle East, perhaps for good.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new wave of Islamic activism surging through the Middle East in the wake of the Persian Gulf War is forcing moderate governments to confront an essential dilemma of the new Arab democracy: How do you keep the most popular party from winning?
NEWS
February 20, 1991
Several non-military factors may influence any decision on starting a land war. For instance, a moonless or half-moon night and high tide would be favorable elements for an amphibious landing. However, religious holidays such as the Muslim holy month of Ramadan might delay action by either side. But Muslim scholars also consider the 10th day of Ramadan to be a favorable day for attack because Mohammed, the prophet, emerged victorious from battle on that day.
NEWS
February 12, 1991
One of the five pillars of Islam is the DAILY RITUAL of prayer, or salat. Muslims face Mecca and pray five times a day: at dawn, at midday, in midafternoon, at sunset and after nightfall . (In Los Angeles, Muslims face 9 degrees east of north) . Salat is preceded by a ritual purification that consists of a series of bowings, prostrations and recitations from the Koran. It is preferable to pray in the company of other Muslims, but private prayer is also valid.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Saddam Hussein said Iraqis could leave their country for only the second time in more than 10 years of war, the Christians were at the head of the line. An estimated 30,000 Iraqis--a high percentage of them Christians--are now filling hotels and apartments here in the Jordanian capital. Many spend their days at Western consulates, hoping for a visa that will let them leave the Middle East, perhaps for good.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
In AD 642, as legend has it, the Caliph Omar commanded that all the books in the Great Library of Alexandria be burned as fuel to heat the city. The city fathers begged him to spare what was one of the Seven Wonders of the World. With diabolical logic, Omar refused. "The Koran is the source of all wisdom," said the Caliph. "So if these books all agree with the Koran, they are redundant and thus can be burned. If they disagree, then they are heretical and thus should be burned."
NEWS
February 11, 1991
"Americans should not be deceived by talk that the Gulf War is a confrontation between Islam and the West. Those who portray it as such want us to believe that no political solution is possible, justifying the use of any amount of force by the West. That Islam is the 'religion of the sword' is a common Western stereotype, as if believers simply read the Koran and immediately seek battle.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1991 | From Religious News Service
The war in the Persian Gulf threatens the future of Christian missionary work in the region for years to come, according to U.S. religious leaders who work in their denomination's foreign mission units. "Things are not going to be the same," said Erich Bridges, news editor for the Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. Missionary work will be harmed "for a half a century anyway," said William H.
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