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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hindu temples are as common in India as churches are in the United States, but Indian immigrants to New England in the 1970s often had to improvise a place to worship. Many set aside a room at home, praying daily before photographs of their gods, and a handful of families took turns opening their homes for ceremonies, said Prema Manohar, an Indian who moved to Connecticut 21 years ago. But it was tough to maintain religious ties and to pass on to their children customs of the ancient religion.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hindu temples are as common in India as churches are in the United States, but Indian immigrants to New England in the 1970s often had to improvise a place to worship. Many set aside a room at home, praying daily before photographs of their gods, and a handful of families took turns opening their homes for ceremonies, said Prema Manohar, an Indian who moved to Connecticut 21 years ago. But it was tough to maintain religious ties and to pass on to their children customs of the ancient religion.
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SPORTS
October 4, 2004 | MIKE PENNER
You watch the New England Patriots equal the NFL record with their 18th consecutive victory Sunday, joining the likes of the John Elway Broncos, the Joe Montana 49ers, the Larry Csonka Dolphins and the George Halas Bears, and immediately your thoughts flash back to the Steve Spurrier Redskins. If not for Spurrier, the last coach to beat the Patriots, New England would be in the record book alone.
SPORTS
May 19, 1991 | ROSS NEWHAN
He has been a baseball executive for 31 years, which makes him a dinosaur in an era of corporate accountants and attorneys operating many organizations. "If I had to do it over, the job being what it is now, I wouldn't do it," Lou Gorman, general manager of the Boston Red Sox, said in his Fenway Park office the other day. "I think it's become the toughest in sports. It used to be a job that called for the judgment of a baseball person. You could have a player in and negotiate one on one.
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