Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReligion New Jersey
IN THE NEWS

Religion New Jersey

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Seven months after the U.S. Supreme Court allowed two Muslim police officers in Newark, N.J., to have beards as an exception to department policy, the Justice Department sued the city, contending it is discriminating against the officers because of their religion. The city threatened the officers with termination and other sanctions because of their beliefs, which include wearing beards, according to the lawsuit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Seven months after the U.S. Supreme Court allowed two Muslim police officers in Newark, N.J., to have beards as an exception to department policy, the Justice Department sued the city, contending it is discriminating against the officers because of their religion. The city threatened the officers with termination and other sanctions because of their beliefs, which include wearing beards, according to the lawsuit.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 28, 1987 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court said Tuesday that it will decide whether a state law calling for a daily "moment of silence" in the public schools violates the Constitution's ban on promoting religion. The New Jersey law does not mention "prayer." However, two lower courts threw it out on grounds that its purpose appeared to be religious. The high court must now decide if a law, although neutral in its language, is irrevocably tainted if legislators who supported it did so because of religious motives.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
An anonymous family of New Jersey atheists is asking a state judge to find that the words “under God” should be stricken from the Pledge of Allegiance. The lawsuit , filed Monday, is nearly identical to one brought in Massachusetts by an unidentified family there. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court could rule in that case any day. “Public schools should not engage in an exercise that tells students that patriotism is tied to a belief in God,” said David Niose, an attorney for the American Humanist Assn.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2007 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Bosses are really mean these days, or employees are really thin-skinned. Lawmakers across the country are considering legislation that would give workers grounds to sue their superiors for being, basically, jerks. Bookstores are stocking bad-boss advice tomes, including "Snakes in Suits" and "Was Your Boss Raised by Wolves?" Today the AFL-CIO will name the worst boss in the country, based on the results of an online contest.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|