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January 9, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
When the first drafts of Nicaragua's new constitution surfaced for public debate, critics of the ruling Sandinista National Liberation Front were quick to notice that God was missing. Indignation echoed in the National Assembly as the regime--a hybrid of atheists, nationalists and Marxist Christians--came under pressure to invoke his name.
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NEWS
December 11, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Crippled since birth and forever poor, Agustin Delgadillo somehow managed to buy enough oranges, bananas and toy whistles for the scores of children making their evening rounds of shrines in his Managua barrio. The modest altar outside his two-room shack was illuminated by a bare light bulb. The centerpiece, nearly hidden among palm fronds and flowers, was a five-inch statue of the Virgin Mary, the object of intense devotion last week in Roman Catholic Nicaragua.
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NEWS
December 11, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Crippled since birth and forever poor, Agustin Delgadillo somehow managed to buy enough oranges, bananas and toy whistles for the scores of children making their evening rounds of shrines in his Managua barrio. The modest altar outside his two-room shack was illuminated by a bare light bulb. The centerpiece, nearly hidden among palm fronds and flowers, was a five-inch statue of the Virgin Mary, the object of intense devotion last week in Roman Catholic Nicaragua.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
When the first drafts of Nicaragua's new constitution surfaced for public debate, critics of the ruling Sandinista National Liberation Front were quick to notice that God was missing. Indignation echoed in the National Assembly as the regime--a hybrid of atheists, nationalists and Marxist Christians--came under pressure to invoke his name.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, still smarting from conservative attacks on his Central America peace proposals, will meet next week in Los Angeles with Nicaraguan opposition leaders in a public show of support for the contras , the White House said Thursday. The session, to be held on Thursday, will include talks with both the rebels' six-member political directorate and their military commander, Enrique Bermudez, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said.
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