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April 11, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the boldest bid at healing the wounds that still fester almost eight decades after Ireland's partition, the leaders of Britain, the Irish Republic and local political parties on Good Friday signed a peace and power-sharing agreement meant to end bloodshed between this province's Protestant and Roman Catholic communities. Seventeen and a half hours after a self-imposed midnight deadline, and following repeated phone intervention by President Clinton, George J.
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NEWS
August 31, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Tensions escalated in Northern Ireland after a man was injured in a shooting and 20 homes were attacked after more than a week of violence linked to a feud between Protestant guerrillas. Politicians said the fledgling home-rule government will not be at risk unless Roman Catholic republican groups are drawn into the violence, which has in the past few days been confined to Protestant groups.
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NEWS
July 5, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where religion and intolerance often walk hand in hand, the peaceful march by members of the Protestant Orange Order that took place Sunday was no small feat. The peace was carefully scripted, to be sure, secured by miles of barbed wire, hundreds of soldiers and police, and a ban on parading through a Roman Catholic neighborhood.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
To the beat of pounding drums, Protestant hard-liners in this British province marched by the tens of thousands Wednesday and vowed to protest until they regain the right to parade past Roman Catholic areas. More than 80,000 members of the Orange Order paraded through Belfast, the provincial capital, and 17 other towns to commemorate Protestant King William of Orange's victory over Catholic King James II on July 12, 1690.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion rocked a Roman Catholic area of Belfast, injuring two men, officials said. The BBC cited "security sources" as saying an explosive device caused the blast. Northern Ireland police said it was not yet clear what prompted the bomb attack. The explosion came a day after a pro-British guerrilla group, the Ulster Freedom Fighters, threatened to end its six-year cease-fire unless Catholic republicans stopped attacking Protestants in Belfast, the provincial capital.
NEWS
March 23, 1988
A Protestant gunman was charged in a Belfast court in the killing of three mourners at a Roman Catholic funeral in Northern Ireland last week, an attack with grenades and gunfire that wounded 68 others. He told police that he "alone carried out this military operation in retaliation for the murder of innocents" by the outlawed Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian has vetoed legislation that would have guided California's pension fund investments away from companies with operations that practice religious or ethnic discrimination in Northern Ireland, the governor's office announced Wednesday. In his veto message, Deukmejian said he believed that the bill, by Assemblyman John Burton (D-San Francisco), would do more harm than good because it would discourage investment in Northern Ireland.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Eleven police officers were injured in overnight rioting in the Northern Ireland town of Portadown, a long-running flash point between Protestants and Roman Catholics, police said Sunday. BBC television said several members of the public were hurt, but no serious injuries were reported. Reuters photographer Paul McErlane said he saw about 100 masked, pro-British "loyalists" throw stones and other objects at security forces at the end of a traditional street parade.
NEWS
April 3, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been 30 years since a Protestant mob showed up with guns at Kathy Nolan's door, ordered her family out and then burned down the street. But it's the first thing the Roman Catholic mother of four remembers when asked whether the time has come for the Irish Republican Army to hand over its weapons, what locals term "decommissioning." "In 1969, there was no one to stop the loyalists," she says, claiming Protestant police officers did nothing to intervene.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
To the beat of pounding drums, Protestant hard-liners in this British province marched by the tens of thousands Wednesday and vowed to protest until they regain the right to parade past Roman Catholic areas. More than 80,000 members of the Orange Order paraded through Belfast, the provincial capital, and 17 other towns to commemorate Protestant King William of Orange's victory over Catholic King James II on July 12, 1690.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion rocked a Roman Catholic area of Belfast, injuring two men, officials said. The BBC cited "security sources" as saying an explosive device caused the blast. Northern Ireland police said it was not yet clear what prompted the bomb attack. The explosion came a day after a pro-British guerrilla group, the Ulster Freedom Fighters, threatened to end its six-year cease-fire unless Catholic republicans stopped attacking Protestants in Belfast, the provincial capital.
NEWS
July 5, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where religion and intolerance often walk hand in hand, the peaceful march by members of the Protestant Orange Order that took place Sunday was no small feat. The peace was carefully scripted, to be sure, secured by miles of barbed wire, hundreds of soldiers and police, and a ban on parading through a Roman Catholic neighborhood.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Eleven police officers were injured in overnight rioting in the Northern Ireland town of Portadown, a long-running flash point between Protestants and Roman Catholics, police said Sunday. BBC television said several members of the public were hurt, but no serious injuries were reported. Reuters photographer Paul McErlane said he saw about 100 masked, pro-British "loyalists" throw stones and other objects at security forces at the end of a traditional street parade.
NEWS
April 3, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been 30 years since a Protestant mob showed up with guns at Kathy Nolan's door, ordered her family out and then burned down the street. But it's the first thing the Roman Catholic mother of four remembers when asked whether the time has come for the Irish Republican Army to hand over its weapons, what locals term "decommissioning." "In 1969, there was no one to stop the loyalists," she says, claiming Protestant police officers did nothing to intervene.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tensions rose in Northern Ireland after Protestants were banned Monday from marching--in the ceremonial garb of their Orange Order brotherhood--through a Catholic area next weekend. Keen to keep a power-sharing peace agreement for the troubled province on track, the British government has already sent an extra 1,000 troops to Northern Ireland to deal with possible violence during the Protestant "marching season."
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the boldest bid at healing the wounds that still fester almost eight decades after Ireland's partition, the leaders of Britain, the Irish Republic and local political parties on Good Friday signed a peace and power-sharing agreement meant to end bloodshed between this province's Protestant and Roman Catholic communities. Seventeen and a half hours after a self-imposed midnight deadline, and following repeated phone intervention by President Clinton, George J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1995 | From Religion News Service
Northern Ireland has endured 25 years of sectarian violence between Catholics and Protestants and eight months of peace. Now, as hundreds of business and political leaders gathered this week for a White House conference to encourage U.S. investment in the economically depressed country, Irish Cardinal Cahan Daly and Presbyterian leader John Dunlop conceded that jobs alone won't end the enmity.
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Tensions escalated in Northern Ireland after a man was injured in a shooting and 20 homes were attacked after more than a week of violence linked to a feud between Protestant guerrillas. Politicians said the fledgling home-rule government will not be at risk unless Roman Catholic republican groups are drawn into the violence, which has in the past few days been confined to Protestant groups.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his living room on Railway Street, retired butcher Cecil Allen stares, without seeing, at a TV game show. "Two boys gone like that," he says. "If some good could come of it. . . . But . . ." On Chapel Street, with a side table laden with cards of condolence from across the island and beyond, the house of garage owner Sean Trainor bursts with heartbreak. "It's good you reopened the garage today, or else the bastards have won," a comforting neighbor murmurs. Sean Trainor is not focusing.
NEWS
July 14, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the parishioners of the Church of Our Lady came together here Sunday morning, it was not to hear Mass or utter more prayers for peace, but to listen to their priest tell of his struggle to make sense of the past few days in Northern Ireland. "Yesterday, I visited the homes of those who were petrol-bombed the night before," Father Eamonn Cowan told his Roman Catholic congregation of about 200 mostly middle-class townspeople.
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