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November 18, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Elizabeth Parker, the president of the Orange County Board of Education, the call to action came when a conservative Christian activist called her a "Nazi lover" for attending an abortion rights meeting. Father Brad Karelius of Santa Ana's Episcopal Church of the Messiah decided to get involved after noticing the increasing discomfort of his middle-of-the-road congregants with the Christian Coalition's fundamentalist views on social issues.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2002 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bishop Tod D. Brown assured parishioners and clergy in Orange County on Monday that the Roman Catholic Church is "taking every possible step" to prevent sexual abuse of children by priests in scandals like those revealed in recent weeks. "The church has become, for some, a place where [children] were hurt, not healed," Brown told hundreds of worshipers--including about 200 Orange County priests--gathered at St. Columban Church in Garden Grove for the annual Chrism Mass.
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NEWS
December 17, 1991 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a chilly, second-floor meeting room at the Ole Hanson Beach Club, eight people are seated in a circle, their eyes closed in meditation. Accompanied by an electric keyboard, they are chanting: "Eheyeh" (Unity), "Jehovah" (cosmic father), "Elohim" (divine mother), "Adonai" (Lord). They are followers of a secretive order known as "Builders of the Adytum," or BOTA, whose members study Tarot "keys" and meditate in their search for spiritual enlightenment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2002 | CHRISTINE HANLEY and RICHARD WINTON, Times Staff Writers
In a candid Palm Sunday sermon, Bishop of Orange Tod D. Brown said it is especially important during Easter week for the Catholic Church to accept responsibility for "terrible, terrible crimes" committed by priests against children and to seek forgiveness for wayward clergymen. While Brown's remarks at an Orange County church struck a chord that was resonating at Catholic churches across the country, Cardinal Roger M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1999 | ALLISON COHEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is no Bible, no sin, no conversion. At The Gathering, a nondenominational Native American church that meets each week in Garden Grove, there is no written Word, no right or wrong, no death or need for redemption--just truth, accountability and a belief that all is sacred and connected. Formally known at the American Indian Church, it was founded with eight members in 1978 by Little Crow, a Garden Grove resident of Dakota and Lakota Indian heritage, and his wife Alice Bryant.
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | LUCY CHABOT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of people seeking spiritual purification walked into the sea Friday evening in what church officials said was the largest baptism in memory. The converts entered the surging surf, some singly, others holding hands with spouses and children, and were greeted by pastors who asked them if they were ready to accept Jesus Christ in their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1990 | LUCY CHABOT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of people seeking spiritual purification walked into the sea Friday evening in what local church officials said was the largest baptism in memory. The converts entered the surging surf, some singly, others holding hands with spouses and children, and were greeted by pastors who asked them if they were ready to accept Jesus Christ in their lives. As the converts nodded or whispered their affirmation, they were briefly submerged in the water. Most surfaced smiling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2000 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Islamic holiday display now shares a patch of grass in Mission Viejo with Joseph, Mary and baby Jesus, marking what Muslim leaders say is the first time in California that the holy month of Ramadan has received equal billing with Christmas on public space. The small billboard shows a photograph of the Kaaba--the central shrine of Islam in Mecca, Saudi Arabia--with a message: "Season's Greetings." A caption under the photo reads "The First House of Worship on Earth."
NEWS
October 12, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an era of fallen televangelists and mass-marketed religion, Pastor Chuck Smith's Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa approaches its 25th anniversary unscathed by scandal and seemingly ever mindful of the pride that could precede a fall. According to a new survey, about 12,000 people attend services at the chapel each Sunday, making it the third-best-attended Protestant church in the nation.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marla Toomire used to attend Sunday services at a neighborhood Baptist church, a short drive from her home in Huntington Beach. But after six years, she and her husband, Jim, got tired of "dry sermons" that had no relevance to their lives. Disillusioned, they began to shop for a new place to worship. Their search led to South Coast Community Church--a sprawling congregation in Irvine where instead of hymnbooks, the lyrics to spirituals are projected on a giant video screen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within the next few years, construction of more than a dozen major buildings in various religious communities will give Orange County's spiritual skyline a more cosmopolitan feel, complete with a Buddhist monastery, one of the country's largest mosques and a $65-million Jewish community center. The building spree spans the county from north--where Yorba Linda Friends has a $23.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't quite 40 years in the wilderness, but the people of Temple Beth El did spend 20 years wandering around south Orange County without a permanent home. The congregation--now nearly 600 families--met in trailers, in other synagogues and in churches. During last year's High Holy Days, they worshiped in a Mormon meeting house. But Friday, the faithful will finally enter the promised land: a new, $18-million building of their own.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't quite 40 years in the wilderness, but the people of Temple Beth El did spend 20 years wandering around south Orange County without a permanent home. The congregation, now nearly 600 families, met in trailers, other synagogues and churches. During last year's High Holy Days, they worshiped in a Mormon meeting house. But Friday, the faithful will finally enter the promised land: a new $18-million building of their very own.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft, whose conservative Christian views threatened his confirmation by the Senate this year, will speak at worship services Sunday at the Crystal Cathedral. At the 9:30 and 11 a.m. services, the Rev. Robert H. Schuller will interview the former U.S. senator from Missouri on "his personal story of faith and family." The exchange also will be broadcast on "The Hour of Power," Schuller's worldwide Sunday television show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Mormon temple in Orange County will be a modest 17,500 square feet, built on seven acres next to the church's Newport Beach meeting house and smaller than that brick structure, officials in Salt Lake City announced Thursday. The exact design hasn't been finalized, but church leaders said it will reflect Los Angeles architecture in public buildings built in the 1920s and 1930s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tim Branson said he came to Sunday's Harvest Crusade to hear Pastor Greg Laurie. His daughter, Ashley, 15, said she came because it's cool to see so many other Christians. The Bransons, who drove to Edison International Field from their Moreno Valley home, were among more than 30,000 people who attended the fifth and final night of Laurie's Harvest Crusade, a rock-laden Christian revival.
NEWS
December 16, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Sundays, although there are more than a thousand people at Mass at St. Irenaeus Catholic Church in Cypress, Karen Barnes rarely feels lost among the pews. That's because throughout the week, activities draw the Barnes family to the church and draw church members to the Barnes home three blocks away. "There isn't ever a time that we go to church that we don't recognize members of our parish," she said. When Sunday comes, "you're not just praying by yourself, you're congregating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1996 | CATHY WERBLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeff Schreiber, a Costa Mesa mail carrier for 19 years, had a dilemma. Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, landed on a Saturday earlier this month and, try as he might, he could not get out of work on the highest of Jewish holidays. The post office relented, and Schreiber had to work just three hours on Rosh Hashana instead of the entire day. Though his struggle became public, dozens of other such situations arise that are typically handled in more private arenas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2000 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scores of Latino garment workers, who spend their days putting sequins on $1,500 evening gowns, stood in the company cafeteria Tuesday morning and wiped tears from their eyes as they sang mananitas, songs they'd known since childhood about the Virgin of Guadalupe. They had arrived at the makeshift Catholic chapel at St. John Knits in Irvine two hours before their 7 a.m. shift to celebrate the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2000 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Islamic holiday display now shares a patch of grass in Mission Viejo with Joseph, Mary and baby Jesus, marking what Muslim leaders say is the first time in California that the holy month of Ramadan has received equal billing with Christmas on public space. The small billboard shows a photograph of the Kaaba--the central shrine of Islam in Mecca, Saudi Arabia--with a message: "Season's Greetings." A caption under the photo reads "The First House of Worship on Earth."
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