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NEWS
May 9, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ayub Masih, a young Pakistani from the village of Sahiwal, was condemned to death under his nation's laws for defaming the Prophet Muhammad. The young man allegedly had praised "The Satanic Verses," the Salman Rushdie novel that many Muslims consider insulting to Islam. The harsh penalty for Masih, a Roman Catholic, for violating Pakistan's notorious blasphemy law might have gone unnoticed, except for a stunning intervention by Bishop John Joseph.
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NEWS
January 3, 2002 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young men who sat cross-legged on the rug, squeezed into a semicircle around the seminary's principal, are the mullahs of tomorrow. Most are poor and from the countryside and not yet old enough to have full, bushy beards. On the admission applications they clutched in their hands, they had agreed not to smoke, get "English-style" haircuts, question decisions of the seminary or join political movements.
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NEWS
October 24, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the ways to measure the Islamic zeal of this country's new rulers, one of the most popular is the counting of beards. The presence of a long beard on a Pakistani male is often regarded here as a crude but quick way to spot an adherent of an extreme interpretation of the Islamic faith. Experts watching the Pakistani army, which seized power in a coup Oct. 12, are relieved to find that the number of beards among senior officers is still decidedly low. Gen.
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Human rights groups plan to appeal the death sentence of a doctor convicted of blasphemy in Pakistan, activists said. Sheik Mohammed Younus, 45, was given the death penalty for making insulting remarks about Islam's prophet Muhammad. He also was fined $1,500. Younus, who like the majority of Pakistanis is Sunni Muslim, was arrested in October after 11 of his students complained about a lecture he gave at a private homeopathic college in the capital, Islamabad.
NEWS
February 29, 1988
Two people were killed and 23 were wounded when 10,000 Hindus attacked government offices in southern Pakistan and fought police over the reported abduction of a Hindu girl. A government statement said the crowd was incited by reports that the 16-year-old girl had been kidnaped by a Muslim and converted to Islam before a magistrate at Mirpurkhas, near the Indian border. An armed crowd demanding her return attacked police and tried to set fire to government offices.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Muslim demonstrators enraged over publication of a book they consider blasphemous continued their rampage Monday as protests spread to a second Pakistani city and into India, where one protester was killed and more than 100 others wounded. The violence in India brought the two-day casualty toll to six dead and 180 people wounded in the demonstrations over Western publication of "The Satanic Verses," a novel by Indian-born author Salman Rushdie.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Five demonstrators were shot and killed Sunday and 80 people were seriously injured when Pakistani riot police opened fire on thousands of protesters attacking the U.S. cultural center here after a demonstration against the British novel "The Satanic Verses" turned into a rock-throwing anti-American melee.
NEWS
May 11, 1998 | Reuters
A bishop who killed himself in protest of Pakistan's blasphemy law was buried Sunday in a ceremony attended by thousands while militant Muslims attacked a Christian village to demand that the law remain. Bishop John Joseph was laid to rest on the grounds of his Faisalabad cathedral as thousands of grieving Christians packed every approach to the building, demanding the repeal of the blasphemy legislation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998
The death sentence given to a Pakistani Christian convicted of blaspheming Islam and the Prophet Muhammad has been suspended by a Pakistani court. The suspension--issued Tuesday by a two-judge panel of the Lahore High Court--remains in effect until a full appeal of the sentence is decided. The judges' decision came after two days of Muslim-Christian clashes and the suicide of a prominent Roman Catholic bishop, who killed himself to protest the death sentence given to Ayub Massih, 26.
NEWS
March 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A couple who married for love did not violate the teachings of Islam, even though the union was not arranged by their parents, Pakistan's High Court ruled. For more than a year, Saima Wahid, who flouted tradition by choosing the man she wanted to marry, lived in a shelter for women in Lahore while her parents tried to have her marriage declared invalid.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | From Reuters
Authorities said Sunday that at least 36 pilgrims had been killed in a stampede at a Muslim shrine in the central province of Punjab. The stampede took place just before midnight Saturday when thousands of pilgrims rushed forward after the Behishti Darwaza, or Paradise Gate, was opened to inaugurate the annual feast, known as urs, at the shrine of a 13th century saint in the town of Pakpattan.
NEWS
January 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Masked gunmen ambushed a religious school's van, killing five Sunni Muslims and wounding three others in the latest round of religious violence in Karachi, Pakistan's main city, police said. The attack led to violent protests, and five students were hurt when police opened fire on demonstrators.
NEWS
December 28, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abu Samara was a gangling lad of 14 when he joined the jihad. He was still too much of a boy to grow the beard required of holy warriors. But he wasn't too young to master the weapons of war. Within weeks, his long, thin fingers were proficient with assault rifles, hand grenades, rocket launchers and the militants' deadliest device: remote-controlled explosives. Then he volunteered to die. Over the next decade, Abu Samara learned advanced weaponry in the rugged mountains of Afghanistan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1999 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three sisters said they had been in hiding for four years in Pakistan, going underground because they would not renounce their Christian faith and embrace Islam. So when they arrived Tuesday in Los Angeles, after being spirited out of Pakistan with help from the Christian Rescue Committee, they gave thanks. Actor Dean Jones, who heads the committee, met Cathrain Shaheen and her sisters, Josephin and Saraphin, at Los Angeles International Airport.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the ways to measure the Islamic zeal of this country's new rulers, one of the most popular is the counting of beards. The presence of a long beard on a Pakistani male is often regarded here as a crude but quick way to spot an adherent of an extreme interpretation of the Islamic faith. Experts watching the Pakistani army, which seized power in a coup Oct. 12, are relieved to find that the number of beards among senior officers is still decidedly low. Gen.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pakistan's parliament on Friday took the first step in approving a law that would make it easier for the government to impose Islam in daily life, a proposal that is threatening to drive the world's newest nuclear power toward political chaos. The measure, pushed through the lower house by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, makes the Koran the supreme law of Pakistan and grants the government powers to enforce it.
NEWS
January 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Masked gunmen ambushed a religious school's van, killing five Sunni Muslims and wounding three others in the latest round of religious violence in Karachi, Pakistan's main city, police said. The attack led to violent protests, and five students were hurt when police opened fire on demonstrators.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a typical night at the movies in this fundamentalist capital of Pakistan's North-West Frontier province. Women in the street outside the Naz Cinema were covered head to foot in the traditional burkha . Most of the men were bearded and wore caps in the tradition of strict Islam. Almost everyone was observing Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting that has just ended.
NEWS
September 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A Pakistani court has for the first time sentenced a Muslim to death for blasphemy. Ghulam Akbar Khan, a member of Pakistan's Shiite Muslim minority, was convicted of taking the name of Islam's prophet Muhammad in vain during a scuffle with a rival Sunni Muslim in 1995. He can appeal the death sentence to a higher court. The blasphemy law, introduced in 1986, allows the death penalty for anyone who profanes Muhammad or Islam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998
The death sentence given to a Pakistani Christian convicted of blaspheming Islam and the Prophet Muhammad has been suspended by a Pakistani court. The suspension--issued Tuesday by a two-judge panel of the Lahore High Court--remains in effect until a full appeal of the sentence is decided. The judges' decision came after two days of Muslim-Christian clashes and the suicide of a prominent Roman Catholic bishop, who killed himself to protest the death sentence given to Ayub Massih, 26.
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