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NEWS
July 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
Workers at a Roman Catholic convent on the edge of the Auschwitz concentration camp punched, kicked and dragged out an American rabbi and six students who occupied the grounds Friday and demanded that the nuns leave. About 20 people, including uniformed and plainclothes police, watched as the workers ripped up the demonstrators' signs and assaulted them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1999 | Religion News Service
For the first time in at least 40 years, a rabbi has been hired by the Jewish community in Warsaw to serve as its spiritual leader. Rabbi Baruch Rabinowicz, a modern Orthodox rabbi who was born in Russia, educated in Denmark and attended yeshiva in Israel, will take up his post this month, a community representative said from the Polish capital, describing Rabinowicz as "both Orthodox and open-minded."
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NEWS
April 17, 1988
Warsaw's only synagogue was filled to overflowing by more than 1,000 young Jews who prayed, danced and sang songs, including the Israeli national anthem, to mark the 45th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising against Nazi occupation troops. No rabbis remain in Poland, but several from Israel, the United States, Canada and England led the Sabbath services at the rebuilt Nozyk Synagogue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1998 | Religion News Service
Roman Catholic activists in Poland erected two more crosses at Auschwitz on Wednesday, just one day after the nation's bishops called for the removal of a sea of crosses that began appearing at the former Nazi death camp earlier this year. The bishops, meeting in the southwestern city of Czestochowa, said about 220 smaller crosses should be removed from the site while the largest cross should be permitted to stay.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He climbed the altar with a cane and spoke with a weary voice, slurring his prayers. The 300,000 worshipers kept interrupting. "We love you!" they chanted. Slowly, Pope John Paul II regained his vigor. He recalled the prediction 19 autumns ago by his mentor, the late Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski, that he, the just-elected Polish pope, would lead the Roman Catholic Church to the year 2000. Then the stooped figure, a distant white speck to many who heard him, electrified the crowd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1998 | Religion News Service
Roman Catholic activists in Poland erected two more crosses at Auschwitz on Wednesday, just one day after the nation's bishops called for the removal of a sea of crosses that began appearing at the former Nazi death camp earlier this year. The bishops, meeting in the southwestern city of Czestochowa, said about 220 smaller crosses should be removed from the site while the largest cross should be permitted to stay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1999 | Religion News Service
For the first time in at least 40 years, a rabbi has been hired by the Jewish community in Warsaw to serve as its spiritual leader. Rabbi Baruch Rabinowicz, a modern Orthodox rabbi who was born in Russia, educated in Denmark and attended yeshiva in Israel, will take up his post this month, a community representative said from the Polish capital, describing Rabinowicz as "both Orthodox and open-minded."
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II, struggling to boost the Roman Catholic Church's declining authority in his native Poland, warned his compatriots Sunday that they cannot build a free post-Communist order "without Christ or against Christ."
NEWS
June 9, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearing the end of an emotional journey home, Pope John Paul II awoke Sunday in the house where he lived as archbishop, made a tearful return to his alma mater and said Mass for more than a million fellow Poles. The crowd, stretching beyond sight to fill a 120-acre meadow, was one of the largest to gather during seven homecomings since the pontiff left here in 1978 to lead the Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He climbed the altar with a cane and spoke with a weary voice, slurring his prayers. The 300,000 worshipers kept interrupting. "We love you!" they chanted. Slowly, Pope John Paul II regained his vigor. He recalled the prediction 19 autumns ago by his mentor, the late Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski, that he, the just-elected Polish pope, would lead the Roman Catholic Church to the year 2000. Then the stooped figure, a distant white speck to many who heard him, electrified the crowd.
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II, struggling to boost the Roman Catholic Church's declining authority in his native Poland, warned his compatriots Sunday that they cannot build a free post-Communist order "without Christ or against Christ."
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II took his message to the Soviet border regions of Poland on Sunday, greeting thousands of Ukrainians who crossed the frontier to see him for the first time.
NEWS
October 22, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When classes started in September at Duracza High School in Warsaw, Elzbieta Domanska and Agnieszka Rostkowska, both 16, were among many of the 800 students at the school stunned over a new feature of the curriculum: religious instruction, one hour weekly, taught by a Roman Catholic priest. "No one expected to see this," said Agnieszka. "It seemed out of place here." "It is more normal to have religious instruction in a holy place," said Elzbieta.
NEWS
November 6, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came by the hundreds Sunday, filling every pew and aisle and nook, then spilling outside into the chilly courtyard of the ornate 15th-Century shrine here on St. Anne's Hill. But they were different from all the other Poles who also honored the Sabbath in this overwhelmingly Roman Catholic country Sunday--even from the ones who attended five other services in the same shrine.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | From Reuters
A majority of the nuns at the disputed Carmelite convent at Auschwitz have left, and the Polish government has said that all of them could be moved out before an alternate facility is built, a World Jewish Congress official said Friday. WJC vice president Kalman Sultanik said that he learned on a recent trip to Warsaw that eight of the 15 nuns have already left.
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