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NEWS
August 13, 1998 | TOM GORMAN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the beginning, there was disappointment--the Great Disappointment, as the faithful of the Seventh-day Adventist Church would come to call it. It happened on a brilliant Maine day in the fall of 1844. A sickly teenage prophetess named Ellen G. White, the church's scriptural architect, waited with her brethren for Jesus Christ's predicted return. When he failed to materialize, White urged her disheartened followers to cherish the surety that such a day indeed would dawn.
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OPINION
August 17, 2013
Re "Invoking God in America," Opinion, Aug. 14 Joseph Margulies posits that a kind of generic "civil religion" pervades politics. This helps explain why candidates persist in touting their belief in God, blatant pandering that flouts the Constitution's declaration that "no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification for any office. " Perhaps future candidates will heed this emphatic stricture from a document that, as Margulies puts it, is a "demonstration of God's hand in helping to guide America's destiny.
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NEWS
June 25, 2001 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In a defiant gesture rooted in the battle over homosexuality, two Third World Anglican archbishops on Sunday consecrated four conservative American priests as bishops. The elevation of the four priests on U.S. soil by foreign archbishops sent shock waves through the worldwide Anglican Communion and its U.S. member, the Episcopal Church. It was decried by the Archbishop of Canterbury as trespassing and brought the 2.3-million-member Episcopal denomination closer to formal schism.
WORLD
May 5, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
ALEXANDRIA, Egypt - The stage along the sea was a politically crafted advertisement for Egypt's diversity: An unveiled woman chatted with a bearded Islamist and a retired soccer star shared the spotlight with a young hero from last year's revolution. A roar erupted from a crowd, mostly students, when a white-haired man in a linen blazer raised his arms. As fireworks flashed in the night sky, Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh called for national unity to end military rule and unrest that have soured the euphoria since Hosni Mubarak was forced from power.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The abrupt dismissal of the Anti-Defamation League's regional director here has illuminated the growing power struggles between East and West Coast Jewry, as the fulcrum of influence over American Jewish life shifts from its historical center in New York. David Lehrer, the regional director who helped knit together Los Angeles' disparate communities during 27 years of wide-ranging human relations work, was dismissed from his post Dec. 21 by National Director Abraham Foxman in New York.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Catholic cardinals fly a lot these days and land in the unlikeliest places. Take Cardinal Dionigi Tettamanzi, archbishop of Genoa, Italy. He strayed from his territory last month to promote ecumenical dialogue between Catholics and Orthodox Christians in newly democratic Serbia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1995 | From Religion News Service
The vast, cave-like interior of the unfinished St. Sava Cathedral echoes with sporadic hammering. Construction on the squat, concrete dome, which one day will be the largest Christian Orthodox Church in the Balkans, has been slowed by shortages and funding problems--a consequence of the U.N. embargo against the former Yugoslavia. "This is the very spot where 400 years ago, Turks burned the relics of St.
NEWS
February 2, 1993 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It started with Billy Graham's refusal to back out of President Bill Clinton's inaugural ceremony, despite fervent pleas from the religious right.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Duke's strategy of inserting Christianity into his campaign for the Louisiana governorship is apparently running into trouble. For the last three weeks, Duke has said religion has changed his life and helped moderate the negative views he held towards blacks and Jews when he was grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan and a Nazi sympathizer.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Pat Robertson, the Christian broadcaster and evangelist who ran for President in 1988, has returned to politics, launching a new religious coalition to train conservative Christians to shape government policy. Robertson--who retreated from political involvement after his failed GOP presidential bid--insists this is not the warmup for another White House run but a grass-roots campaign "to make government and the media responsive to our concerns. . . .
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee
Airing on Easter and Passover, the Sunday morning news talk shows used the occasion to explore the religious questions and controversies that could emerge in the presidential election. On “Face the Nation,” Catholic Archbishop Timothy Dolan said he hoped that if Mitt Romney were to become the Republican nominee for president, that his Mormon faith would not prove a liability. “There may be reasons not to vote for Mitt Romney as president of the United States,” Dolan told host Bob Schieffer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Christopher Hitchens, the engaging and enraging British-American author and essayist whose polemical writings on religion, politics, war and other provocations established him as one of his generation's most robust public intellectuals, has died. He was 62. Hitchens died Thursday night at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, said his literary agent, Steve Wasserman. Hitchens was diagnosed with advanced esophageal cancer in June 2010, when his memoir, "Hitch-22," hit the bestseller lists.
OPINION
October 2, 2011 | By Penn Jillette
Because I wrote a book with "Atheist" in the subtitle and I go on political TV shows to hawk that book, well-groomed meat puppets frequently ask me why politicians like Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry are saying bugnutty Christian stuff. I have an idea why these politicians have gone all religious, but I haven't found a way to explain it in a sound bite, which is why I'm writing this. I think the whole problem comes down to the word "Christian" and what it has come to mean in my lifetime.
OPINION
June 17, 2011
Religion and politics Re "Old-time religion, today's politics," Opinion, June 11 Tim Rutten has it exactly right about dangerous religious litmus tests for office, just the way John F. Kennedy warned the nation 50 years ago. Kennedy wisely advised the conservative Christian leaders in Houston in 1960 that we all should "believe in an America where the separation of church and state is absolute. " It is far from that today, thanks to opportunistic religious fundamentalist politicians like Rick Perry, Sarah Palin and Rick Santorum.
OPINION
June 11, 2011 | Tim Rutten
In the midst of a hotly contested presidential election a little more than half a century ago, John Kennedy went to Houston to give the most important speech of his campaign. No Catholic ever had been elected to the White House, and the young Massachusetts senator chose a Protestant audience deep in the Bible belt — the Greater Houston Ministerial Assn. — as the venue in which to address the so-called religious issue. This is the heart of the case he put to the association and the nation: "I believe in an America where the separation of church and state is absolute; where no Catholic prelate would tell the president — should he be Catholic — how to act, and no Protestant minister would tell his parishioners for whom to vote; where no church or church school is granted any public funds or political preference, and where no man is denied public office merely because his religion differs from the president who might appoint him, or the people who might elect him....
OPINION
June 5, 2011 | Doyle McManus
Of the 44 U.S. presidents, all but a handful have been affiliated with a relatively narrow list of traditional Protestant denominations. Eleven were Episcopalians (12 if you count Thomas Jefferson, whose adult beliefs are a subject of debate), eight were Presbyterians, four were Methodists and four were Baptists. Others included Congregationalists, Dutch Reformed and Disciples of Christ. President Obama attended Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, a congregation with traditional Protestant roots despite its untraditional pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. In Washington, Obama has attended services at mostly black Protestant churches.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen years after the Iranian revolution wrought the world's first modern theocracy, Islamic fundamentalism once again is becoming both a nemesis and an enigma for U.S. policy-makers. As the threat from communism wanes, some U.S. analysts predict that Islam will be increasingly--and wrongly--perceived as one of the principal rival ideologies and potential threats to the West and its predominantly Judeo-Christian culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The Rev. E.V. Hill, long a politically conservative voice among African American clergy, declared his candidacy Wednesday for president of the nation's largest black Baptist denomination to succeed the Rev. Henry Lyons, recently convicted of misusing church funds. Hill, 65, one of the most prominent black ministers in Los Angeles and pastor of Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church, said Wednesday that he can provide leadership that the National Baptist Convention USA "desperately needs."
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