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NEWS
January 20, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Constantine Antimie knew the moment he crossed into his native Romania late last month that things were different: the border agent, without the customary frisking or luggage search, greeted him and his brother with a friendly "Welcome to Romania!" The moment proved a false harbinger. Within hours, the two Antimie brothers from Fullerton were attacked three times by armed assailants in the revolution-torn nation. The third time proved deadly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1990 | Associated Press
After a nine-day campaign in Oradea, Bucharest and Timisoara attended by more than 215,000 people, Portland, Ore.-based evangelist Luis Palau said about 46,100 people had shown a commitment to Christ.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1990 | Associated Press
After a nine-day campaign in Oradea, Bucharest and Timisoara attended by more than 215,000 people, Portland, Ore.-based evangelist Luis Palau said about 46,100 people had shown a commitment to Christ.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | Religious News Service
Romania has granted legal status to 17,000 Jehovah's Witnesses after decades of repression, according to a statement by the New York-based group. The group was banned in Romania in 1948. Denominational officials were formally notified of their change in status in Bucharest on April 21. Romania follows other East European governments in recognizing the Witnesses.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | Religious News Service
Romania has granted legal status to 17,000 Jehovah's Witnesses after decades of repression, according to a statement by the New York-based group. The group was banned in Romania in 1948. Denominational officials were formally notified of their change in status in Bucharest on April 21. Romania follows other East European governments in recognizing the Witnesses.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a quiet, old-fashioned apartment in the mid-Wilshire district, the preacher who sparked the Romanian revolution is taking a break from catching history's treacherous waves. Laszlo Tokes, pale, tired-looking, dark-eyed, seems to fit perfectly with the red chintz chairs, dark furniture and portrait miniatures on the walls.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | DAN FISHER and HARRY TRIMBORN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He basked as sycophants proclaimed him the "Genius of the Carpathians," but Nicolae Ceausescu will be remembered instead as the doddering tyrant whose incomprehensible belief that he could stay the same while all around him changed finally cost him his life. Even as he carefully crafted an image of independence from his neighbors in what used to be called the Soviet Bloc, the longtime Romanian leader built a family dynasty and ruthlessly insisted on unquestioning obedience from his own subjects.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a quiet, old-fashioned apartment in the mid-Wilshire district, the preacher who sparked the Romanian revolution is taking a break from catching history's treacherous waves. Laszlo Tokes, pale, tired-looking, dark-eyed, seems to fit perfectly with the red chintz chairs, dark furniture and portrait miniatures on the walls.
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Constantine Antimie knew the moment he crossed into his native Romania late last month that things were different: the border agent, without the customary frisking or luggage search, greeted him and his brother with a friendly "Welcome to Romania!" The moment proved a false harbinger. Within hours, the two Antimie brothers from Fullerton were attacked three times by armed assailants in the revolution-torn nation. The third time proved deadly.
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