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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1997 | ROB O'NEIL
Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis is worried that America is in danger of losing the "unum" in our national motto, "E Pluribus Unum" ("Out of many, one"). Preacher, writer, thinker and nationally known leader of the largest local temple, Valley Beth Shalom in Encino, Schulweis fears that "we in the Valley and in the nation are in danger of losing that overarching connection that joins us together." "Consider how feeble our interfaith activities in our communities [are]," he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1997 | ROB O'NEIL
Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis is worried that America is in danger of losing the "unum" in our national motto, "E Pluribus Unum" ("Out of many, one"). Preacher, writer, thinker and nationally known leader of the largest local temple, Valley Beth Shalom in Encino, Schulweis fears that "we in the Valley and in the nation are in danger of losing that overarching connection that joins us together." "Consider how feeble our interfaith activities in our communities [are]," he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1997 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Muslims today begin a month of daytime fasting, a $2.2-million mosque--the first in Southern California to be built solely with local money--nears its long-delayed opening in the San Fernando Valley. During Ramadan, the holiest month on the Islamic calendar, able-bodied Muslims are expected to abstain from food, drink and sex from dawn to sunset as an act of spiritual self-discipline. At mosques, the Koran, the sacred scripture of Islam, is recited in its entirety during the lunar month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1997 | JOHN DART
Church historians say the worldwide, tongues-speaking Pentecostal movement began with the exuberant 1906-09 Azusa Street Revival in downtown Los Angeles. Less known is that the charismatic renewal--a similar movement found today in mainstream Protestant and Catholic churches--first surfaced at an Episcopal church in Van Nuys. On a pre-Easter Sunday morning in 1960, the Rev. Dennis Bennett announced to the early services at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1997 | JOHN DART
Church historians say the worldwide, tongues-speaking Pentecostal movement began with the exuberant 1906-09 Azusa Street Revival in downtown Los Angeles. Less known is that the charismatic renewal--a similar movement found today in mainstream Protestant and Catholic churches--first surfaced at an Episcopal church in Van Nuys. On a pre-Easter Sunday morning in 1960, the Rev. Dennis Bennett announced to the early services at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1997 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Muslims today begin a month of daytime fasting, a $2.2-million mosque--the first in Southern California to be built solely with local money--nears its long-delayed opening. During Ramadan, the holiest month on the Islamic calendar, all able-bodied Muslims are expected to abstain from food, drink and sex from dawn to sunset as an act of spiritual self-discipline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1997 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Muslims today begin a month of daytime fasting, a $2.2-million mosque--the first in Southern California to be built solely with local money--nears its long-delayed opening in the San Fernando Valley. During Ramadan, the holiest month on the Islamic calendar, able-bodied Muslims are expected to abstain from food, drink and sex from dawn to sunset as an act of spiritual self-discipline. At mosques, the Koran, the sacred scripture of Islam, is recited in its entirety during the lunar month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1997 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Muslims today begin a month of daytime fasting, a $2.2-million mosque--the first in Southern California to be built solely with local money--nears its long-delayed opening. During Ramadan, the holiest month on the Islamic calendar, all able-bodied Muslims are expected to abstain from food, drink and sex from dawn to sunset as an act of spiritual self-discipline.
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