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NEWS
March 16, 1991 | Associated Press
American and British commanders Friday warned soldiers not to eat, drink or smoke in public during daylight when the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan begins Sunday. "Guests in the kingdom are expected to be aware of Ramadan, respect the feelings of fasting people and conduct themselves accordingly," said a memorandum issued to U.S. personnel by the Central Command in Riyadh.
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NEWS
February 18, 2002 | From Reuters
Britain said Sunday that it had sent four Hercules aircraft to Kabul to help airlift hundreds of Afghans to Saudi Arabia for the annual hajj, or pilgrimage. Answering a request from Afghanistan's interim prime minister, Hamid Karzai, an Afghan aviation authority official said Saudi Arabia had sent a Boeing 747 and Pakistan had sent an Airbus A-310 to help transport pilgrims. The United Arab Emirates was sending several aircraft to carry 1,000 pilgrims, UAE's official news agency, WAM, reported.
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NEWS
December 16, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid increasingly strident opposition by religious conservatives to American influences in the kingdom, there is a growing sense within Saudi Arabia that, whether the crisis in the Persian Gulf is resolved by peace or by war, the Saudis cannot afford to wait much longer. Saudi Arabia until now has adamantly opposed a negotiated solution to the crisis.
NEWS
March 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
Despite calls for patience and courteousness, pilgrims pushed and shoved their way Friday around the Grand Mosque, where more than 1.5 million Muslims gathered to pray. On this last Muslim Sabbath before the peak of the hajj, the annual pilgrimage to holy sites in Saudi Arabia, the prayer leader urged pilgrims to be "kind, gentle, patient and tolerant to other pilgrims while they are performing the rituals."
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A plan to send El Dorado County Christmas trees to troops in the Middle East has hit a snag. Volunteers were informed by the U.S. Embassy in Saudi Arabia that the importation of any product for religious holidays other than the Islamic religion is prohibited. The county's Christmas tree growers have made 35 trees available to be shipped in specially designed mailing tubes. Local banks donated money and schoolchildren planned to make decorations.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lobby of the Marriott Hotel here calls to mind the rollicking bar of the movie "Star Wars," an unlikely menage of intergalactic travelers brought together at some distant outpost for a cup of cheer. Amid gleaming glass elevators, roving bellhops and potted plants, dozens of Kuwaiti refugees call helplessly after errant toddlers. Saudi businessmen in flowing white robes and headdresses bend in intense conversation over cups of tea.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the 10th day of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan in 1973, but Egyptian President Anwar Sadat already had decreed that his soldiers would be exempt from the fast as they prepared to launch a daring drive across the Suez Canal into the Sinai Desert. The president was more than a little discomfited when he strode into the operations room before the first strike and found his senior commanders fasting. The operation, he sternly warned, needed their full concentration.
NEWS
July 25, 1988
Thousands of Muslims on the annual pilgrimage to Islam's holiest shrines ritually slaughtered sheep on a plain in Saudi Arabia to commemorate Abraham's offer to sacrifice his son to God. The ritual marked the end of the hajj, or pilgrimage, and the start of the four-day Eid al Adha, or Feast of Sacrifice, which is observed by about 850 million Muslims worldwide. More than 1 million Muslims--including about 1,000 from the United States--came to Mecca for the observance.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | From Reuters
Saudi Arabia is sending sacrificial meat to Islamic countries to distribute to refugees after the slaughter of nearly two million lambs near Mecca on Tuesday as part of the annual Muslim pilgrimage. The official Saudi Press Agency said that trucks carrying 6,000 lamb carcasses left Thursday for Jordan for distribution among Palestinian refugees. So far, 52 trucks carrying 31,200 carcasses have gone to Jordan, the agency said.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family portraits hang in two rows on the living room wall, just above the sofa. There is Wahid Ishgi's, looking stern and fatherly, and his wife's, with her dangling earrings and irrepressible smile. Below those are school photographs of the girls. Well, most of the girls. Sixteen-year-old Meme ordered hers removed last year, lest an uncle or a cousin enter the house and see her face unveiled.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
Creating a sea of white robes, more than 2 million Muslims stood in prayer Monday in 100-degree heat at Arafat, the mount overlooking Mecca where the prophet Muhammad delivered his last sermon 14 centuries ago. The annual pilgrimage, or hajj, to Mecca had been incident-free--unlike some previous ones, which were marred by fires and stampedes--and the Saudis were going out of their way to keep it that way.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A professor at King Abdulaziz University was giving a lesson last month on politics and activism, terrorism and tolerance. The recent killing of Egyptian secularist author Farag Foda by Islamic extremists came up. "I said, 'It's one thing for Palestinians to kill Jews, or even for Palestinians to kill Arab collaborators, but Egyptians killing Egyptians? How can you justify the killing of Farag Foda?' " he recalled. "One student raised his hand and said, 'He wrote an article criticizing Islam.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost five months after their bold crime, the women who dared to drive are still jobless and trapped in a country where they have suffered scorn and ridicule. By driving a convoy of cars through the streets of Riyadh on Nov. 6, at a time when a world on the brink of war focused attention on Saudi Arabia, 49 Saudi women violated longstanding Islamic tradition to press demands for a limited agenda of equal rights and opportunity.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | Associated Press
American and British commanders Friday warned soldiers not to eat, drink or smoke in public during daylight when the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan begins Sunday. "Guests in the kingdom are expected to be aware of Ramadan, respect the feelings of fasting people and conduct themselves accordingly," said a memorandum issued to U.S. personnel by the Central Command in Riyadh.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere in Jidda, in a dark, crowded prison cell, six young men await their encounter with Islamic justice for ambushing a bus with guns this month and slightly wounding two American GIs. Justice for the men--four Palestinians and two Yemenis--is apt to be swift.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the 10th day of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan in 1973, but Egyptian President Anwar Sadat already had decreed that his soldiers would be exempt from the fast as they prepared to launch a daring drive across the Suez Canal into the Sinai Desert. The president was more than a little discomfited when he strode into the operations room before the first strike and found his senior commanders fasting. The operation, he sternly warned, needed their full concentration.
NEWS
March 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
Despite calls for patience and courteousness, pilgrims pushed and shoved their way Friday around the Grand Mosque, where more than 1.5 million Muslims gathered to pray. On this last Muslim Sabbath before the peak of the hajj, the annual pilgrimage to holy sites in Saudi Arabia, the prayer leader urged pilgrims to be "kind, gentle, patient and tolerant to other pilgrims while they are performing the rituals."
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time was 1942, the Second World War. Forty thousand American troops were deployed in a barren Middle Eastern country to protect what President Franklin D. Roosevelt called the "bridge to victory"--an overland supply line for delivering war materiel to the Soviet Union, materiel vital to its resistance to Nazi Germany. The country was Iran, and in that far-distant day, GIs were greeted as "saviors." Children pursued them through the streets shouting "Johnny, Johnny!"
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out in the Saudi Arabian desert on Christmas Eve, 28 soldiers shed their guns and worldly burdens and dip into the warm Saudi waters. This is no idle swim under the stars. Rather, it is a baptism, a ceremony admitting 28 souls to Christianity, a symbolic spiritual purification and washing away of sins. The soldiers of Operation Desert Shield are not only being baptized regularly, but also praying, witnessing, making confession and reading the Bible.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid increasingly strident opposition by religious conservatives to American influences in the kingdom, there is a growing sense within Saudi Arabia that, whether the crisis in the Persian Gulf is resolved by peace or by war, the Saudis cannot afford to wait much longer. Saudi Arabia until now has adamantly opposed a negotiated solution to the crisis.
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