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NEWS
June 28, 1987 | From The Washington Post
The powerful Dutch Reformed Church, to which most of South Africa's politically dominant white Afrikaners belong, split Saturday when extreme conservatives decided to break away and form their own new church committed to preserving strict racial segregation.
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NEWS
November 10, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Black and white leaders of 90 of South Africa's Christian churches, concluding their first conference in nearly 30 years, joined Friday to reject apartheid as a sin and confess their own role in fostering segregation. The action was largely a symbolic gesture because each of the participating denominations, including the Dutch Reformed Church, has made similar statements individually in recent years. The white branch of the Dutch Reformed Church, whose 1.
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NEWS
June 1, 1988
South African anti-apartheid religious leaders ended an emergency conference with a call for intensified nonviolent resistance to the government. They also backed a three-day trade union anti-apartheid protest to be held next week. Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu acknowledged that there were deep divisions among the clergy members and said he was disappointed that they could not agree on stronger action.
NEWS
August 16, 1988
South African church leaders endorsed a stand by 143 young white men who have refused compulsory army service. The 143 announced earlier this month that they would not report for their two-year initial training or for follow-up service totaling 24 months over 12 years because they regard the armed forces as an instrument of unjust racial policies. The 32 bishops of the Southern African Catholic Bishops Conference said the inductees' stand is "a clear sign of a growing awareness" of injustices.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Anglican and Catholic bishops led a dawn procession of 600 worshipers, many carrying wooden crosses, through downtown Durban on Friday to pray for the release of South Africa's thousands of political detainees. The multiracial procession, led by Catholic Archbishop Denis E.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Defying the government's latest crackdown on the anti-apartheid movement, South African religious leaders called Sunday for an intensified struggle to end minority white rule here. "The government of South Africa has signed its own death warrant," the Rev. Allan Boesak, president of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches, told a large, multiracial congregation in Cape Town. "No government can challenge the living God and survive."
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The white Dutch Reformed Church, the religious organization of President Pieter W. Botha and 95% of his Cabinet, has declared apartheid "a sin" and again confessed its guilt for having helped establish, maintain and justify racial segregation for nearly four decades. The action was considered a small advance for the 1.5-million member church. In 1986, it had acknowledged that apartheid is a mistake, that the church's attempts to justify it biblically were wrong and that racism is a sin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Tall, white-haired, unfailingly courteous, almost patrician, Denis Hurley looks every bit an archbishop, not at all the sort of man to become known as a "meddlesome priest." But the Roman Catholic Church's increasingly tough opposition to apartheid, South Africa's system of racial separation and minority white rule, has put it into almost constant conflict with the government.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Defying the government's latest crackdown on the anti-apartheid movement, South African religious leaders called Sunday for an intensified struggle to end minority white rule here. "The government of South Africa has signed its own death warrant," the Rev. Allan Boesak, president of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches, told a large, multiracial congregation in Cape Town. "No government can challenge the living God and survive."
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | From The Washington Post
The powerful Dutch Reformed Church, to which most of South Africa's politically dominant white Afrikaners belong, split Saturday when extreme conservatives decided to break away and form their own new church committed to preserving strict racial segregation.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Anglican and Catholic bishops led a dawn procession of 600 worshipers, many carrying wooden crosses, through downtown Durban on Friday to pray for the release of South Africa's thousands of political detainees. The multiracial procession, led by Catholic Archbishop Denis E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Tall, white-haired, unfailingly courteous, almost patrician, Denis Hurley looks every bit an archbishop, not at all the sort of man to become known as a "meddlesome priest." But the Roman Catholic Church's increasingly tough opposition to apartheid, South Africa's system of racial separation and minority white rule, has put it into almost constant conflict with the government.
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