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August 16, 1997 | GINGER THOMPSON, THE BALTIMORE SUN
When their journey into the 20th century began, the Matses Indians imitated the jaguar. They tattooed their faces and wore whiskers of palm straw on their lips and chins. They kidnapped women, killed intruders, choked unwanted babies and ate their dead. Three decades later, the Matses wear T-shirts and baseball caps. They read and write, practice birth control and plant crops. On Sundays, some go to church and pray--"talk to our father," they say.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1997 | GINGER THOMPSON, THE BALTIMORE SUN
When their journey into the 20th century began, the Matses Indians imitated the jaguar. They tattooed their faces and wore whiskers of palm straw on their lips and chins. They kidnapped women, killed intruders, choked unwanted babies and ate their dead. Three decades later, the Matses wear T-shirts and baseball caps. They read and write, practice birth control and plant crops. On Sundays, some go to church and pray--"talk to our father," they say.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | GINGER THOMPSON, THE BALTIMORE SUN
For five years, missionaries Ivagene Shive and Mary Ann Lord trekked through the Amazon rain forest, searching for a group of Indians hidden away for generations. The women camped on riverbanks, hoping to find the Indians gathering turtle eggs. They hung gifts--pots, spoons, knives and packets of plastic beads--in trees. They flew over the jungle and dropped bundles of food and cloth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | GINGER THOMPSON, THE BALTIMORE SUN
For five years, missionaries Ivagene Shive and Mary Ann Lord trekked through the Amazon rain forest, searching for a group of Indians hidden away for generations. The women camped on riverbanks, hoping to find the Indians gathering turtle eggs. They hung gifts--pots, spoons, knives and packets of plastic beads--in trees. They flew over the jungle and dropped bundles of food and cloth.
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