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SPORTS
August 28, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The Olympic flame arrived on South Korean soil Saturday, 21 days before the opening of the Games of the XXIV Olympiad in Seoul, and was greeted by a thunderstorm, children in bright costumes performing traditional folk dances of Cheju Island--and shamans. The shamans, who worship animist spirits, were unable to chase away the rain showers, but that wasn't high on their list of priorities. Their role was to exorcise the demons that threaten the Seoul Olympics.
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NEWS
December 5, 1992 | Associated Press
The leader of a doomsday sect was sentenced Friday to two years in prison for swindling $4.4 million from his fanatical followers. Lee Jang-rim, 44, had led the Mission for Coming Days, the nation's largest doomsday sect with about 10,000 followers. It was one of several to predict the end of the world would come in late October. Lee was found to have bought large amounts of bonds with maturities extending beyond Oct.
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NEWS
October 29, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For hundreds of followers of the Dami Mission in Seoul, the most amazing thing about today is that it arrived. They, like an estimated 20,000 South Koreans, had believed they would be lifted into heaven at the stroke of midnight Wednesday in the beginning of the end of the world.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judgment day caught up with the largest of the South Korean churches predicting the impending end of the world. The Dami Mission disbanded and apologized to the nation. The "doomsday" churches had predicted that last Wednesday would bring the Rapture--the faithful's ascension to heaven. Possibly thousands of believers sold property, left families, and quit schools and jobs. A newspaper said the disbanding was approved by the church's founder, in jail on charges of swindling parishioners.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judgment day caught up with the largest of the South Korean churches predicting the impending end of the world. The Dami Mission disbanded and apologized to the nation. The "doomsday" churches had predicted that last Wednesday would bring the Rapture--the faithful's ascension to heaven. Possibly thousands of believers sold property, left families, and quit schools and jobs. A newspaper said the disbanding was approved by the church's founder, in jail on charges of swindling parishioners.
NEWS
December 5, 1992 | Associated Press
The leader of a doomsday sect was sentenced Friday to two years in prison for swindling $4.4 million from his fanatical followers. Lee Jang-rim, 44, had led the Mission for Coming Days, the nation's largest doomsday sect with about 10,000 followers. It was one of several to predict the end of the world would come in late October. Lee was found to have bought large amounts of bonds with maturities extending beyond Oct.
NEWS
September 28, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Im Hwa Ja, bewildered and depressed, has seen her entire world collapse around her. Since last November, her husband of 25 years, a prosperous director of a book-publishing firm, abruptly quit his job, sold the house, began beating her and now, to keep himself "clean," refuses to sleep with her. Im's three sons, the pride of her life, dropped out of their university.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
The United Methodist Church has passed along a plea from its bishops in South Korea that American clergy forgo international conferences sponsored by the Rev. Sun Young Moon's Unification Church. Korean church leaders suffer "dismay and embarrassment" from the visits of United Methodist clergy to their country, Bishop Ki Chun Chang, president of the Korean Methodist Council of Bishops, wrote to his American counterparts. Copies of the letter were to be sent to all 45 U.S.
OPINION
November 3, 2008 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
There's probably no nation in the world more emblematic of the pitfalls and challenges of rapid modernization than South Korea. South Korean society is a caldron of competition and contradiction, caught between respecting the past and striving for the future.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For hundreds of followers of the Dami Mission in Seoul, the most amazing thing about today is that it arrived. They, like an estimated 20,000 South Koreans, had believed they would be lifted into heaven at the stroke of midnight Wednesday in the beginning of the end of the world.
NEWS
September 28, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Im Hwa Ja, bewildered and depressed, has seen her entire world collapse around her. Since last November, her husband of 25 years, a prosperous director of a book-publishing firm, abruptly quit his job, sold the house, began beating her and now, to keep himself "clean," refuses to sleep with her. Im's three sons, the pride of her life, dropped out of their university.
SPORTS
August 28, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The Olympic flame arrived on South Korean soil Saturday, 21 days before the opening of the Games of the XXIV Olympiad in Seoul, and was greeted by a thunderstorm, children in bright costumes performing traditional folk dances of Cheju Island--and shamans. The shamans, who worship animist spirits, were unable to chase away the rain showers, but that wasn't high on their list of priorities. Their role was to exorcise the demons that threaten the Seoul Olympics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
The United Methodist Church has passed along a plea from its bishops in South Korea that American clergy forgo international conferences sponsored by the Rev. Sun Young Moon's Unification Church. Korean church leaders suffer "dismay and embarrassment" from the visits of United Methodist clergy to their country, Bishop Ki Chun Chang, president of the Korean Methodist Council of Bishops, wrote to his American counterparts. Copies of the letter were to be sent to all 45 U.S.
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