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NEWS
September 10, 1989
Sudan's military ruler opened a peace conference in Khartoum aimed at ending six years of civil war and appealed to the leader of the rebels to attend. Gen. Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir told the conference in the capital that he would take "all measures" to ensure the safety of John Garang, leader of the Sudan People's Liberation Army, if he would attend. The rebels are boycotting the meeting after announcing preconditions for Garang's attendance.
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NEWS
April 6, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stifling heat of spring lies on the backs of the Blue Nile and the White Nile where they meet here on this dusty plain. The result is soporific. A driver, arms and head sprawling from his taxi's window, snores. A soldier lets his rifle dangle in the dirt as his chin dips onto his chest. Men in white robes and turbans droop under the few trees along the river.
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NEWS
February 26, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Mohammed Idem never denied that he was caught with a load of stolen auto parts in his car after his two cohorts fled on foot. But he would have liked a chance to plead that the poverty of his life with a wife, six children, his father, mother and brother had driven him to thievery. That might have mitigated his sentence. Instead, Idem had no opportunity to speak before the Islamic judge at his trial, which lasted the briefest part of an afternoon.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The military rulers of Sudan are planning to revive Islamic sharia laws, Sudanese and diplomatic sources in Khartoum said. The Islamic laws are fiercely opposed by non-Muslim rebels fighting a civil war in the south, and their revival in the mainly Arab and Muslim north would diminish hopes of peace. The Sudan People's Liberation Army has been fighting a civil war since 1983 in the Christian and animist south.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The military rulers of Sudan are planning to revive Islamic sharia laws, Sudanese and diplomatic sources in Khartoum said. The Islamic laws are fiercely opposed by non-Muslim rebels fighting a civil war in the south, and their revival in the mainly Arab and Muslim north would diminish hopes of peace. The Sudan People's Liberation Army has been fighting a civil war since 1983 in the Christian and animist south.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stifling heat of spring lies on the backs of the Blue Nile and the White Nile where they meet here on this dusty plain. The result is soporific. A driver, arms and head sprawling from his taxi's window, snores. A soldier lets his rifle dangle in the dirt as his chin dips onto his chest. Men in white robes and turbans droop under the few trees along the river.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, after a meeting here Saturday with Sudanese rebel leader John Garang, said she will renew U.S. discouragement of investment in Sudan's fledgling oil industry. Canadian, Malaysian and Chinese firms are cooperating in the operation of a pipeline exporting oil from newly developed fields in Sudan, where a brutal civil war has been raging for 16 years. The U.S. government has prohibited American firms from investing.
BOOKS
May 6, 2001 | DAVID RIEFF, David Rieff, a contributing writer to Book Review, is the author of several books, including "Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West," and is co-editor of "Crimes of War: What the Public Should Know."
The African catastrophe gnaws and gnaws at the moral imagination of every decent person in the West. And for good reason. Put starkly, the bad news from the continent seems exponentially worse than that coming from any other part of the world, and the good news, such as it is, is in such short supply.
NEWS
September 10, 1989
Sudan's military ruler opened a peace conference in Khartoum aimed at ending six years of civil war and appealed to the leader of the rebels to attend. Gen. Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir told the conference in the capital that he would take "all measures" to ensure the safety of John Garang, leader of the Sudan People's Liberation Army, if he would attend. The rebels are boycotting the meeting after announcing preconditions for Garang's attendance.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Mohammed Idem never denied that he was caught with a load of stolen auto parts in his car after his two cohorts fled on foot. But he would have liked a chance to plead that the poverty of his life with a wife, six children, his father, mother and brother had driven him to thievery. That might have mitigated his sentence. Instead, Idem had no opportunity to speak before the Islamic judge at his trial, which lasted the briefest part of an afternoon.
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