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May 15, 1995 | From Associated Press
A 6-year-old boy in a remote corner of Chinese-controlled Tibet was designated Sunday as the reincarnation of the second most important monk in Tibetan Buddhism. Tibet's exiled leader, the Dalai Lama, announced that Gedhun Choekyi Nyima had been revealed as the reborn Panchen Lama and appealed to Chinese authorities to allow the boy to be trained as a senior monk. The announcement opens another potential quarrel between China and the Dalai Lama, who fled Chinese rule in Tibet in 1959.
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NEWS
January 19, 2000 | Associated Press
The Reting Lama, an important monk in Tibetan Buddhism, has not yet been reborn, and the 2-year-old boy installed by China cannot be the true reincarnation, the Dalai Lama's office said Tuesday. The Dalai Lama told followers of the Reting Lama last month that his mystical powers of divination have produced no clues indicating that the soul of the abbot has been reborn, a spokesman said.
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NEWS
April 16, 1996 | Reuters
China has called for tighter controls on Tibetan Buddhist temples to clamp down on pro-independence propaganda and combat increased opposition to Chinese rule, the Tibet Daily said in a report seen here Monday. News of the call for stronger controls on pro-independence monks and nuns came as a Western advocacy group accused China of widespread torture of detained clergy in the restive Himalayan region and of suppressing religious growth there.
NEWS
August 28, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gyayang is 27, wears Chicago Bulls T-shirts and spends his evenings hanging out in a crowded, smoky cafe called Increase the Peace. Lhamo is 59, wears traditional Tibetan garb and spends her mornings worshiping in a crowded, smoky temple called the Jokhang, Tibet's holiest site. The two are strangers separated by generation, lifestyle and piousness in this city perched atop the roof of the world.
NEWS
August 28, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gyayang is 27, wears Chicago Bulls T-shirts and spends his evenings hanging out in a crowded, smoky cafe called Increase the Peace. Lhamo is 59, wears traditional Tibetan garb and spends her mornings worshiping in a crowded, smoky temple called the Jokhang, Tibet's holiest site. The two are strangers separated by generation, lifestyle and piousness in this city perched atop the roof of the world.
NEWS
May 18, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
China condemned the Dalai Lama for declaring that a 6-year-old boy is the reincarnation of the Panchen Lama, the second most important monk in Tibetan Buddhism. The official New China News Agency said the Dalai Lama's announcement Sunday of the discovery of Gedhun Choekyi Nyima in a remote corner of Chinese-controlled Tibet was a plot to undermine the Chinese government's authority there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1992 | From Religious News Service
An 8-year-old boy has been recognized and confirmed as the new leader of the Kagyu sect, one of the four branches of Tibetan Buddhism. The recent enthronement in Tibet of the leader, known as the Gyalwa Karmapa, was the first time the Communist government of China has approved such a ceremony. China has controlled the government of Tibet since 1953. Reincarnations of leaders of Tibetan Buddhism are often identified at very young ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after winning the Nobel Peace Prize, the Dalai Lama, the Tibetan leader, is looking ahead--to changes in China, to the future of his homeland, even to life after his own death. "In case I pass away under present circumstances, when it is necessary to choose a new Dalai Lama, then definitely it should be in a free country," he proclaims. "My reincarnation will not appear in Chinese hands or under Chinese control."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
While the world watched in horror as Chinese troops crushed the fledgling student democratic movement in Tien An Men square, Tibetans could take small comfort in knowing that they were observing an all-too-familiar pattern of harsh repression. Since the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1950, Tibetans have watched their protests brutally suppressed. But 12 Tibetan monks from the Dalai Lama's Namgyal Monastery won't give up.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of the snowcapped mountains separating China's western provinces from Tibet, monks at a scattering of Tibetan Buddhist monasteries struggle to keep their religion alive. Just as part of the daily meditation involves cultivating flowers and trees on the grounds, the monks and lamas are devoted to sowing the seeds of Buddhism in a modern world. On this arid plateau, neither is easy.
NEWS
June 29, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Both boys are too young to shave, and neither counts his age beyond the fingers of two hands. Both live in the Chinese capital surrounded by police who supervise their every move. But only one is His Holiness the 11th Panchen Lama, the second-most revered figure in Tibetan Buddhism, who by tradition reigns in this gritty but sacred city in the highlands of south-central Tibet.
NEWS
June 29, 1999 | Henry Chu
In the world of Tibetan Buddhism, the top two spots belong to the Dalai Lama and the Panchen Lama, both of whom are believed to be living gods worthy of worship, and who are reincarnated over and over again. The Panchen Lama's lineage dates back to the 17th century. The original Panchen Lama was tutor to the fifth Dalai Lama, who gave his teacher the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery in Shigatse in gratitude. Panchen Lamas have served as abbots of the monastery for centuries.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of the snowcapped mountains separating China's western provinces from Tibet, monks at a scattering of Tibetan Buddhist monasteries struggle to keep their religion alive. Just as part of the daily meditation involves cultivating flowers and trees on the grounds, the monks and lamas are devoted to sowing the seeds of Buddhism in a modern world. On this arid plateau, neither is easy.
NEWS
October 23, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Chinese President Jiang Zemin, his upcoming visit to the United States is his coming-out party as a world statesman. But a disparate coalition of protesters vows to rain on his parade, spotlighting the gulf between American and Chinese social values and tarnishing efforts by both governments to create a new businesslike relationship.
NEWS
April 16, 1996 | Reuters
China has called for tighter controls on Tibetan Buddhist temples to clamp down on pro-independence propaganda and combat increased opposition to Chinese rule, the Tibet Daily said in a report seen here Monday. News of the call for stronger controls on pro-independence monks and nuns came as a Western advocacy group accused China of widespread torture of detained clergy in the restive Himalayan region and of suppressing religious growth there.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that is bound to divide Tibetan Buddhists, Chinese officials this morning drew lots from a golden urn to identify a rival "soul boy" as the reincarnation of the second holiest figure in Tibet, the Panchen Lama. China's selection creates a challenger to the 6-year-old Panchen Lama already selected by the exiled Tibetan leader, the Dalai Lama, in May.
NEWS
May 27, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere in a monastery deep in Tibet, surrounded by doting monks and religious teachers, a 6-year-old boy sits in the eye of a raging theological storm. On one side of the religious dispute is the world's last major Communist country, where the state religion is atheism. On the other side is the man many believe to be the world's most perfect living Buddha, the Dalai Lama, Tibet's exiled religious leader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1994 | From Religious News Service
Amid rising international attention on human rights violations in China, the Dalai Lama, stopping in the Bay Area this week during a five-city American tour, entered the fray in the controversy over whether there is a living Buddha, and suggested that the Chinese government might try to use the debate to divide the Tibetan people.
NEWS
May 27, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere in a monastery deep in Tibet, surrounded by doting monks and religious teachers, a 6-year-old boy sits in the eye of a raging theological storm. On one side of the religious dispute is the world's last major Communist country, where the state religion is atheism. On the other side is the man many believe to be the world's most perfect living Buddha, the Dalai Lama, Tibet's exiled religious leader.
NEWS
May 18, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
China condemned the Dalai Lama for declaring that a 6-year-old boy is the reincarnation of the Panchen Lama, the second most important monk in Tibetan Buddhism. The official New China News Agency said the Dalai Lama's announcement Sunday of the discovery of Gedhun Choekyi Nyima in a remote corner of Chinese-controlled Tibet was a plot to undermine the Chinese government's authority there.
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