Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReligion Turkey
IN THE NEWS

Religion Turkey

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yakub Guney, a Syrian Orthodox priest, compares this ancient, dwindling community of Christians to a sick old man, "slowly, slowly, slipping away." When Guney came in 1944 to the village of Bulbul, huddled in a stony valley of southeastern Turkey, 80 families lived here. Until November, there were 22 families. Now there are 12. "I tell them, don't go--but what can we do?" he said with a gesture of hopelessness, standing in front of the 1,000-year-old church of golden stone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new army chief has vowed to keep up the battle against Islamic fundamentalism in Turkey, quashing widespread speculation that, under his command, the rigidly pro-secular armed forces would take a softer approach to the resurgent Islamist movement and keep out of politics. Gen.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly everyone in Istanbul, one of the world's fastest-growing and most unruly cities, will tell you that Recep Tayyip Erdogan is doing a better job of managing the chaos than they ever thought possible. Thanks to the 44-year-old mayor, they say, the city is cleaner and greener. Garbage is picked up regularly, trees are being planted, and hard coal has replaced the lignite that once fueled a choking smog. New dams and pipes channel more water to people's homes.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly everyone in Istanbul, one of the world's fastest-growing and most unruly cities, will tell you that Recep Tayyip Erdogan is doing a better job of managing the chaos than they ever thought possible. Thanks to the 44-year-old mayor, they say, the city is cleaner and greener. Garbage is picked up regularly, trees are being planted, and hard coal has replaced the lignite that once fueled a choking smog. New dams and pipes channel more water to people's homes.
NEWS
July 13, 1997 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Secularists sealed their triumph over a fallen Islamist-led government Saturday as Parliament gave Turkish Prime Minister Mesut Yilmaz's new ruling coalition an inaugural vote of confidence. The 281-256 vote followed a rowdy debate, punctuated by fistfights, that reflected months of social and political tensions over the role of religion in public life. "A new era has opened in Turkish history," a somber-looking Yilmaz told the deputies after the dust settled.
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new army chief has vowed to keep up the battle against Islamic fundamentalism in Turkey, quashing widespread speculation that, under his command, the rigidly pro-secular armed forces would take a softer approach to the resurgent Islamist movement and keep out of politics. Gen.
NEWS
August 17, 1997 | Associated Press
Trying to curb the influence of Islam on Turkey's youth, parliament on Saturday approved a measure that curbs attendance at the country's religious schools. The new law, fiercely opposed by Islamists, requires students to go to secular-oriented private and public schools for eight years instead of five.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Apostolos Daniilides, an ethnic Greek, decided to become an Orthodox priest 26 years ago, he set off for the only Christian theological university in Muslim Turkey. Perched on a pine-forested hill on a tiny island off the coast of Istanbul, the Halki Theological University has trained generations of Orthodox clergy and every ecumenical Orthodox patriarch who has led the world's 270 million Orthodox Christians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During Lent, Christianity's season of fasting and penitence, a quarrel has grabbed hold of the Orthodox Church that is so acrimonious that priests and experts say it could ultimately lead to the greatest split in Christendom in more than 900 years. At immediate issue are souls, churches, monasteries and 8,750 acres in the small Baltic nation of Estonia.
TRAVEL
January 14, 2007 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
TO the surprise of almost everyone in the travel industry, Turkey welcomed a near record number of 500,000 American tourists in 2006, even more than in the heady travel days before 9/11. That's as it should be: Turkey is a colorful and friendly destination that is ranked among the 10 most popular nations for tourism. It receives more than 20 million tourists a year. Among that group, American visitors are especially valued.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Apostolos Daniilides, an ethnic Greek, decided to become an Orthodox priest 26 years ago, he set off for the only Christian theological university in Muslim Turkey. Perched on a pine-forested hill on a tiny island off the coast of Istanbul, the Halki Theological University has trained generations of Orthodox clergy and every ecumenical Orthodox patriarch who has led the world's 270 million Orthodox Christians.
NEWS
August 17, 1997 | Associated Press
Trying to curb the influence of Islam on Turkey's youth, parliament on Saturday approved a measure that curbs attendance at the country's religious schools. The new law, fiercely opposed by Islamists, requires students to go to secular-oriented private and public schools for eight years instead of five.
NEWS
July 13, 1997 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Secularists sealed their triumph over a fallen Islamist-led government Saturday as Parliament gave Turkish Prime Minister Mesut Yilmaz's new ruling coalition an inaugural vote of confidence. The 281-256 vote followed a rowdy debate, punctuated by fistfights, that reflected months of social and political tensions over the role of religion in public life. "A new era has opened in Turkish history," a somber-looking Yilmaz told the deputies after the dust settled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During Lent, Christianity's season of fasting and penitence, a quarrel has grabbed hold of the Orthodox Church that is so acrimonious that priests and experts say it could ultimately lead to the greatest split in Christendom in more than 900 years. At immediate issue are souls, churches, monasteries and 8,750 acres in the small Baltic nation of Estonia.
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yakub Guney, a Syrian Orthodox priest, compares this ancient, dwindling community of Christians to a sick old man, "slowly, slowly, slipping away." When Guney came in 1944 to the village of Bulbul, huddled in a stony valley of southeastern Turkey, 80 families lived here. Until November, there were 22 families. Now there are 12. "I tell them, don't go--but what can we do?" he said with a gesture of hopelessness, standing in front of the 1,000-year-old church of golden stone.
OPINION
April 4, 2009 | Jack Miles, Jack Miles is professor of English and religious studies at UC Irvine and senior fellow for religion and international relations at the Pacific Council on International Policy.
"They say we are at war with Islam. This is the whispered line of the extremist who has nothing to offer in this battle of ideas but blame. ... We are not at war with Islam. But too often since 9/11, the extremists have defined us. ... When I am president, that will change." -- Barack Obama, August 2007 -- When President Obama addresses the Turkish parliament on Monday, he will have the chance to fulfill a campaign promise.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|