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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 44 years, the Catholics of Mshana have had no place to pray. Like all other Ukrainian Catholic Churches, the tin-domed church of Mshana was absorbed into the Russian Orthodox Church in 1946, on the orders of the dictator Josef Stalin, as part of his drive to eliminate Ukrainian nationalism. "Our church has never been Orthodox, and it never will be," Denko Koblitsky, a defiant Catholic farmer said recently, pointing with pride to the tiny, 200-year-old building.
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NEWS
June 24, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II, starting one of the most delicate missions of his 23-year reign, urged Ukraine's Roman Catholic and Orthodox Christian communities Saturday to bury centuries of religious feuding, and assured wary Orthodox believers that he had not come here to raid their flock in search of converts. "Let us recognize our faults as we ask forgiveness for the errors committed in both the distant and recent past," the pontiff from neighboring Poland said in fluent Ukrainian after he landed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1998 | Associated Press
The Ukrainian branch of the Russian Orthodox Church has denounced a new national ID system as "the mark of the Antichrist." The system introduced last fall is similar to U.S. Social Security numbers and has become more widespread in recent weeks. The Holy Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church in Ukraine appealed to President Leonid Kuchma, the government and Parliament to change it.
NEWS
April 16, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Prokhmalskaya, a feisty 69-year-old, knew it was a sin to get into a fistfight, especially during Lent. But she plunged into a quarrel, lost control and hit a fellow villager in Urizh named Anna Sopotnitskaya. "I want your blood now. I want the entire world to look bleak for you," Prokhmalskaya, a Greek Catholic, shrieked at Sopotnitskaya, 45, a member of the Ukrainian Orthodox flock.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II, starting one of the most delicate missions of his 23-year reign, urged Ukraine's Roman Catholic and Orthodox Christian communities Saturday to bury centuries of religious feuding, and assured wary Orthodox believers that he had not come here to raid their flock in search of converts. "Let us recognize our faults as we ask forgiveness for the errors committed in both the distant and recent past," the pontiff from neighboring Poland said in fluent Ukrainian after he landed.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bishops of the Russian Orthodox Church announced Friday that they have defrocked the controversial head of their Ukrainian branch, accusing him of "slander and blackmail." The drastic decision by the synod, meeting at Moscow's 13th-Century Danilovsky Monastery, threatens to deepen a schism between the central church and its rebellious Ukrainian see.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first it was only for three months, so the Brooklyn rabbi said,why not? We are needed. Let's go help Ukrainian Jews who have never set foot in a synagogue or lighted Shabbas candles. So Rabbi Yaakov Bleich said goodby to New York, gathered his wife, Bashy, and headed off to the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, where Jewish life once flourished, to renew his people's ancient covenant with God. It was 1990, and perestroika was in full swing.
NEWS
April 16, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Prokhmalskaya, a feisty 69-year-old, knew it was a sin to get into a fistfight, especially during Lent. But she plunged into a quarrel, lost control and hit a fellow villager in Urizh named Anna Sopotnitskaya. "I want your blood now. I want the entire world to look bleak for you," Prokhmalskaya, a Greek Catholic, shrieked at Sopotnitskaya, 45, a member of the Ukrainian Orthodox flock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1998 | Associated Press
The Ukrainian branch of the Russian Orthodox Church has denounced a new national ID system as "the mark of the Antichrist." The system introduced last fall is similar to U.S. Social Security numbers and has become more widespread in recent weeks. The Holy Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church in Ukraine appealed to President Leonid Kuchma, the government and Parliament to change it.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bishops of the Russian Orthodox Church announced Friday that they have defrocked the controversial head of their Ukrainian branch, accusing him of "slander and blackmail." The drastic decision by the synod, meeting at Moscow's 13th-Century Danilovsky Monastery, threatens to deepen a schism between the central church and its rebellious Ukrainian see.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first it was only for three months, so the Brooklyn rabbi said,why not? We are needed. Let's go help Ukrainian Jews who have never set foot in a synagogue or lighted Shabbas candles. So Rabbi Yaakov Bleich said goodby to New York, gathered his wife, Bashy, and headed off to the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, where Jewish life once flourished, to renew his people's ancient covenant with God. It was 1990, and perestroika was in full swing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 44 years, the Catholics of Mshana have had no place to pray. Like all other Ukrainian Catholic Churches, the tin-domed church of Mshana was absorbed into the Russian Orthodox Church in 1946, on the orders of the dictator Josef Stalin, as part of his drive to eliminate Ukrainian nationalism. "Our church has never been Orthodox, and it never will be," Denko Koblitsky, a defiant Catholic farmer said recently, pointing with pride to the tiny, 200-year-old building.
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