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NEWS
March 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sergei Komarov, a mathematics major at Moscow State University, spends his free time studying videotapes of speeches by the Rev. Sun Myung Moon and his followers and poring over literature about Moon's controversial religious movement. The 18-year-old Muscovite first encountered the group last spring after he saw a flyer at his school urging anyone who spoke English to apply for free trips to the United States.
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NEWS
December 22, 1991 | Reuters
Iran's supreme religious leader said Saturday that the disintegration of the Soviet Union was caused by its godlessness and not, as the West would like to believe, the failure of Marxist-Leninist economic policies. "Denial of God's existence and disbelief in spirituality were among the effectual factors behind the collapse and disintegration of the Soviet Union as well as the drastic changes in Eastern Europe," the Ayatollah Ali Khamenei was quoted as saying by Iran's official news agency IRNA.
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NEWS
July 27, 1988
A five-man team of Israeli diplomats left for Moscow on a trip described by a Foreign Ministry official as a "major event." Yeshayahu Anug, deputy director of the Foreign Ministry, said the delegation's immediate purpose is to help process Israeli visas, both for Soviet Jews wishing to emigrate and those seeking to visit. The delegates traveled first to The Hague, where they are to pick up two-month Soviet visas before leaving Thursday for Moscow.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the chaos of the collapsing Soviet empire, a young Tadzhik man emerged from a crowd of pro-democracy protesters on the troubled streets of this Central Asian capital recently with a tattered poem in his hand. It was titled "Tigris"--the work of an Iranian poet who wrote extensively against the Shah of Iran at the height of the fundamentalist Islamic revolution that changed the face of that country more than a decade ago. "And the rebuilders build again," the poem began.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 44 years, the Catholics of Mshana have had no place to pray. Like all other Ukrainian Catholic Churches, the tin-domed church of Mshana was absorbed into the Russian Orthodox Church in 1946, on the orders of the dictator Josef Stalin, as part of his drive to eliminate Ukrainian nationalism. "Our church has never been Orthodox, and it never will be," Denko Koblitsky, a defiant Catholic farmer said recently, pointing with pride to the tiny, 200-year-old building.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Mother Teresa of Calcutta arrived Thursday in Moscow and said she would like to send missionaries to the Soviet Union to provide "love and care" as they do in 77 other countries. Mother Teresa, who in 1979 was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, is in Moscow for a five-day visit as the guest of the Soviet Peace Committee. Her hosts said she will meet with leaders of the Russian Orthodox Church and travel to the Ukraine to meet with resettled refugees from last year's nuclear disaster at Chernobyl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1989 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
The newly benevolent view of religion in the Soviet Union, part of that country's democratic reforms, was reaffirmed recently at Western religious conferences and at an unprecedented meeting of World Council of Churches leaders in Moscow. A long-awaited proposal for a Soviet law on freedom of conscience is scheduled to be debated next month by the Supreme Soviet, the national legislature, according to the New York-based Appeal of Conscience Foundation headed by Rabbi Arthur Schneier.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | Associated Press
Pope John Paul II will open the first meeting of Ukrainian bishops in more than four decades by receiving each bishop privately, the Vatican said Saturday. The change from the Pope's usual opening with the entire group is a sign of special concern for the Ukrainian church, which was suppressed by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin in 1946. "The Pope wanted to begin with a human rapport," papal spokesman Joaquin Navarro said. "They can talk, greet each other, get to know each other."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1990 | From Times wire services
The first in a historic series of television programs featuring the Rev. Robert H. Schuller will air Sunday throughout the Soviet Union during prime time as part of a first-of-its-kind agreement between Schuller and the Soviets' State Committee for Radio and Television. The agreement will allow Schuller, pastor of Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, to make 12 television broadcasts once a month to the Soviet people.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Halting decades of state-sponsored atheism, the Soviet legislature Wednesday overwhelmingly endorsed a landmark law on religion that lifts a longtime ban on Sunday schools for children and home prayer services while explicitly prohibiting discrimination against believers. "This bill has been won by our people through much suffering," Mikhail Kulakov, chairman of the country's Seventh-day Adventist Church, said in double-edged remarks showing both his sadness and joy.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
From the tumult in the Soviet Union, the Russian Orthodox Church has emerged as a visible and powerful force, overcoming seven decades of communism that sought to write God's obituary. During the hard-liners' attempted coup in August, priests handed out the New Testament to resisters and soldiers while affixing icons of Jesus Christ to tanks and barricades in Moscow. When the outcome of the coup was still in doubt, church Patriarch Alexei II demanded that detained Soviet President Mikhail S.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
An international leader of the Armenian Church, officially visiting Los Angeles for the first time, said his church could play an important peacemaking role in the Middle East as well as take advantage of new religious freedoms in Armenia and the Soviet republics.
NEWS
April 29, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dispute over Hebrew texts, with notes scribbled in the margins by five generations of rabbis in a tiny Byelorussian town, has become a test of wills between the Chabad Lubavitch movement and Soviet bureaucrats. Four rabbis from the United States and Israel say they will stay in Moscow until they are given more than 12,000 books that belonged to chief Lubavitch Rabbi Sholom Ber Schneerson.
NEWS
April 8, 1991 | From Reuters
Russian Federation leader Boris N. Yeltsin and other senior Soviet officials joined worshipers at Easter services Sunday, giving an official stamp to the Russian Orthodox church's most important holiday. Yeltsin stood in the center of a special section after midnight in the vast Epiphany Cathedral. He and other prominent guests of honor--Soviet Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov and Deputy Moscow Mayor Sergei Stankevich--placed candles in a gilt stand as Patriarch Alexei II looked on.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1990
When Father Leonid Kishkovsky, 43, the first Eastern Orthodox president of the National Council of Churches, was in Los Angeles this week he praised the Soviet legislature for lifting a longtime ban on religious education at churches and ended government funding of atheism classes: "Critically important in the new law . . . is what appears to be the disengagement of the state from the propagation of atheism.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze met for almost five hours Thursday without removing the final obstacles to an arms control treaty, but ranking officials on both sides expressed optimism that agreement could be reached before the superpower summit meeting starts May 30. "There are gaps between us," a senior State Department official said after Baker and Shevardnadze quit for the night shortly before 10 Moscow time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Signs abound of continued enthusiasm for religion in the Soviet Union on the eve of the Orthodox Easter this Sunday--with little slowing of the input from U.S. Christian groups. * A weeklong festival will start today in Red Square with a candlelight prayer service. Thousands of orphans and handicapped children will attend ballet, circus and puppet theater performances. "These might be hard times, but they don't need to be bad times in Moscow," said the Rev. J.W. Canty, a U.S.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Climaxing a week of religious and national renewal in the Ukraine, returning Catholic Cardinal Myroslav Lubachivsky on Sunday conducted a Byzantine Mass in a Lvov cathedral for the first time in half a century. Inside the freshly gilded, exuberantly baroque Cathedral of St. George, the seat of his church, Lubachivsky raised his voice in triumph through the prayers and incense.
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