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NEWS
September 3, 1998 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A witch walks through the lobby of a Laguna Beach hotel and no one even notices. She looks too normal. Wiccan high priestess Phyllis Curott, a sleek blond with a full set of teeth, has none of the storybook traits. Nose, wartless; hair, snarl-free though long; complexion, more pink than green; outfit, above suspicion except for the chalice on a cord that hangs around her neck. Maybe it's just a vase. Her life story, though, is a bit off-center.
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OPINION
March 26, 2014
Re “Religious rights case at high court could have a ripple effect,” March 24 The religious right wants to take us back to the good old days when women were denied access to birth control and contraception. The fundamentalists in all religions have this in common: They discriminate against women, and they want to control them. The Supreme Court must decide whether for-profit companies, because of the religious objections of the owners, can deny employees the health coverage to which they are entitled by law. Hobby Lobby has 13,000 employees from all walks of life and religious persuasions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1989 | LISA MASCARO, Times Staff Writer
Pilar is a 19-year-old student at Irvine Valley College who holds a nearly full-time job at a chiropractor's office and lives with her family in Laguna Canyon. In her free time, she studies to be a witch. On Saturday, Pilar (she prefers to be known only by her first name), was attending the Reclaiming the Goddess Within conference in Laguna Niguel, a gathering of established and would-be witches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1999 | ELAINE GALE
Organizers of the fourth annual Women of Faith gathering expect 19,000 this weekend in Anaheim. The event is billed as a female counterpoint to the Promise Keepers, although there's no formal connection between the organizations. "Our conferences are both gender-specific, biblically based and focus on putting your faith in the person of Jesus Christ," said Mary Graham, vice president of conference development for Women of Faith.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | MAURA DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Betty Schaefer was 19 when she put on a white wedding dress provided by the convent of the Dominican Order of Sisters and took her first religious vows. She became Sister Davida, taking her mother's maiden name, and every day wore a black veil and long white tunic. She taught at Catholic schools. At night, even while she slept, she was required to keep her head covered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1998 | Associated Press
The Roman Catholic church has no plans to let women be ordained as deacons, the step below priesthood that allows men to preach at Mass and to help celebrate liturgical services, Vatican officials said Tuesday. Cardinal Pio Laghi, who heads the Vatican's Congregation for Catholic Education, said the ban on female deacons boiled down to one reason: "Christ was a man." Ordination of men as deacons is widely done in the United States, which has 12,000 of the 22,000 deacons worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1990
The Rev. Joan Brown Campbell, who heads the U.S. Office of the World Council of Churches, has been nominated to become chief staff officer of the National Council of Churches, the nation's preeminent ecumenical body. The National Council announced Campbell's nomination on Wednesday and said the choice would be voted on at the council's General Board meeting next week in Portland, Ore. If elected, Campbell would become the second woman to serve as the NCC's chief staff official.
NEWS
November 13, 1988
Women, who make up 51% of the overall Roman Catholic population, are almost invisible in the top policy-making jobs in the church's 175 dioceses in the United States, a new study said. The study, "All Work and No Say," looked at 19 top-level jobs in chancery offices, finance and administration, education and other ministries. It was prompted by the release last April of the first draft of the bishops' pastoral letter on women's concerns.
NEWS
September 27, 1988 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, Times Religion Writer
The election of the first woman bishop in the 450-year history of the Anglican Communion last weekend will severely test the unity of the 70-million-member worldwide body, as well as hinder reconciliation talks between Anglicans and Roman Catholics, according to church leaders. While Robert Runcie, the archbishop of Canterbury, urged the Church of England to respect the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts' choice of the Rev. Barbara C.
NEWS
May 31, 1988
Israel's two chief rabbis said the Supreme Court meddled in religious affairs by ordering a woman seated on a religious council and declared that any man who agrees to sit with her is a weakling. The decision by Rabbis Avraham Shapira and Mordechai Eliyahu pitted the secular law of the Jewish state against religious law, or Halacha, which many Orthodox Jews believe is the higher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
She is widely viewed as a prostitute. Some historic paintings of her are seen as little more than pious pornography. She was the sensuous woman depicted as Jesus' supposed wife in the controversial 1988 motion picture "The Last Temptation of Christ." She was also portrayed as the harlot who loved Jesus in the 1960s rock musical "Jesus Christ Superstar." And she is fast becoming a heroine and feminist role model for women who want a greater role in the Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
October 15, 1998 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In the womb of the Great Mother Earth, enveloped by the towering redwoods of the Santa Cruz mountains, a bare-breasted Hawaiian beauty and a stately crone prepare to receive ordination. A purifying bonfire illuminates the black night as five women slowly circle with incense, a candle, a bell and bowls of water and earth. "Tonight we welcome ourselves into the lap of the Goddess," elder priestess Ruth Barrett calls out. "We acknowledge, honor and celebrate . . . the resurgence of the Goddess."
NEWS
September 3, 1998 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A witch walks through the lobby of a Laguna Beach hotel and no one even notices. She looks too normal. Wiccan high priestess Phyllis Curott, a sleek blond with a full set of teeth, has none of the storybook traits. Nose, wartless; hair, snarl-free though long; complexion, more pink than green; outfit, above suspicion except for the chalice on a cord that hangs around her neck. Maybe it's just a vase. Her life story, though, is a bit off-center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1998 | Associated Press
The Roman Catholic church has no plans to let women be ordained as deacons, the step below priesthood that allows men to preach at Mass and to help celebrate liturgical services, Vatican officials said Tuesday. Cardinal Pio Laghi, who heads the Vatican's Congregation for Catholic Education, said the ban on female deacons boiled down to one reason: "Christ was a man." Ordination of men as deacons is widely done in the United States, which has 12,000 of the 22,000 deacons worldwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1997 | From Religion News Service
Roman Catholic bishops from North and South America are wringing their hands over such problems as the impact of non-Catholic faiths on their continents, the role of poor nations' international debt on their societies and lackluster parish life throughout the hemisphere. But with only one week remaining in the four-week Synod on America, which will advise Pope John Paul II on the hemispheric issues, one of the most glaring omissions has been women's aspirations inside the church and in society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1997 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jennifer Hoffer, 26, had never been under the same roof with 15,000 women. And it was scary. But it also was wonderful, she said. Hoffer, a Loma Linda resident, was among thousands who gathered Friday for the second annual Women of Faith Joyful Journey Conference at the Pond of Anaheim. "In everyday life, we can get so caught up in the daily grind that we sometimes lose sight of God," she said. "This is a great way to bring us all together."
NEWS
September 19, 1987 | RUSSELL CHANDLER and DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writers
A woman lay leader, saying "not to question, not to challenge . . . is to deny my dignity as a person," Friday pointedly asked Pope John Paul II to grant women and other members of the laity greater roles in the church. The pontiff, who told Donna Hanson later that "yours was a great talk," emphatically reemphasized traditional church teachings and reasserted the church's stance that bearing and rearing children are women's most important roles.
NEWS
September 19, 1987 | Associated Press
Here are excerpts from the speech by Donna Hanson, bishop's secretary for social services in the Diocese of Spokane, Wash., at a meeting of U.S. laity with Pope John Paul II: . . . The Native Americans, the original inhabitants of our land, provide me with a central theme for today. Their wise counsel is "Never judge another's life until you have walked in their shoes for a day." It is my hope that today we may walk together.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All they wanted was the right to pray with some of the same spiritual adornments as men--to hold the Torah, to wear a prayer shawl, to sing aloud the ancient praises of God--as they stood before the holiest shrine of Judaism. But when the 25 women gathered at Jerusalem's Western Wall in what would become a test case of women's role in religion and the role of religious authority in a modern democratic state, none expected the fury of the response.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
It took just under two millennia for women to reach the top rung of the denominational ladder, but the recent election of two more women bishops by two denominations signifies there is no turning back, church leaders said. More than two decades after her church began ordaining women, the Rev. April Ulring Larson, 42, on June 12 became the first woman to be named a Lutheran bishop in the United States. Two weeks earlier, the Rev.
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