Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReligion Yugoslavia
IN THE NEWS

Religion Yugoslavia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 26, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hours of swaying trance-like and chanting Islamic prayers, the dervishes who live in Serbia's Kosovo province began the ultimate test of their faith. Crowded before a dervish altar, the little boys went first. Shejh Xhemali Shehu, the holy father of the clan, blessed a metal spear the size of a knitting needle and then guided it through the fleshy cheek of each youngster's beaming face. No blood. A miracle, the holy father proclaimed. The older men went next.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hours of swaying trance-like and chanting Islamic prayers, the dervishes who live in Serbia's Kosovo province began the ultimate test of their faith. Crowded before a dervish altar, the little boys went first. Shejh Xhemali Shehu, the holy father of the clan, blessed a metal spear the size of a knitting needle and then guided it through the fleshy cheek of each youngster's beaming face. No blood. A miracle, the holy father proclaimed. The older men went next.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the international peace coordinator for Bosnia, Carl Bildt, took a walkabout with Santa Claus the other day in downtown Sarajevo, he bore tidings of political support as well as holiday joy. The Bosnian version of Santa Claus--actually a New Year's Eve figure known as Grandfather Frost--has been at the center of a controversy that illuminates the country's growing spirit of peacetime disharmony.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the international peace coordinator for Bosnia, Carl Bildt, took a walkabout with Santa Claus the other day in downtown Sarajevo, he bore tidings of political support as well as holiday joy. The Bosnian version of Santa Claus--actually a New Year's Eve figure known as Grandfather Frost--has been at the center of a controversy that illuminates the country's growing spirit of peacetime disharmony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1987 | TOM GORMAN, Times Staff Writer
There's something of an architectural--not to mention functional--contrast in the two buildings that sit side by side on the San Marcos hillside. In one--a quintessential California multipurpose auditorium with a stage at one end, a kitchen at the other and 800 chairs and folding tables in between--bingo players gather weekly to try their luck.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Ten summers ago, six Croatian youths in the Yugoslavian countryside said they had visions of the Virgin Mary and received messages from her. As the Madonna's purported messages continued, often daily, millions of Catholic tourists flocked to the village of Medjugorje, making it a rival of the famous Roman Catholic pilgrimage sites of Lourdes and Fatima. But things have been going badly lately for Mary of Medjugorje (pronounced Meh-ju-gor-yay).
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | CAROL J.WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Near the parched garden of the Serbian Orthodox monastery, where garlic hung out to dry radiates a pungent aroma in the unrelenting sun, a polished black marble headstone towers incongruously over its humble surroundings. The memorial honors eight Orthodox monks assassinated by Croatian fascists in August, 1941. Their bullet-riddled bodies were dumped into a nearby cavern along with Serbian villagers who were buried alive and left to suffocate.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | CAROL J.WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Near the parched garden of the Serbian Orthodox monastery, where garlic hung out to dry radiates a pungent aroma in the unrelenting sun, a polished black marble headstone towers incongruously over its humble surroundings. The memorial honors eight Orthodox monks assassinated by Croatian fascists in August, 1941. Their bullet-riddled bodies were dumped into a nearby cavern along with Serbian villagers who were buried alive and left to suffocate.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Ten summers ago, six Croatian youths in the Yugoslavian countryside said they had visions of the Virgin Mary and received messages from her. As the Madonna's purported messages continued, often daily, millions of Catholic tourists flocked to the village of Medjugorje, making it a rival of the famous Roman Catholic pilgrimage sites of Lourdes and Fatima. But things have been going badly lately for Mary of Medjugorje (pronounced Meh-ju-gor-yay).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1987 | TOM GORMAN, Times Staff Writer
There's something of an architectural--not to mention functional--contrast in the two buildings that sit side by side on the San Marcos hillside. In one--a quintessential California multipurpose auditorium with a stage at one end, a kitchen at the other and 800 chairs and folding tables in between--bingo players gather weekly to try their luck.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|