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NEWS
June 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
The House voted Tuesday to protect religious broadcasters by prohibiting the Federal Communications Commission from regulating the content of speech aired by noncommercial educational radio and television stations. The bill, passed 264 to 159, was in reaction to an FCC statement, made in December and rescinded in January, that broadcasters seeking licenses for free, specially reserved educational TV channels should devote half their air time to educational programs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2007 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
KOCE will remain Orange County's public television station after its owners announced an agreement Thursday that gives the world's second-largest religious broadcaster a toehold in Southern California, ending more than three years of legal fighting over the station's fate.
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NEWS
August 19, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The Sandinista authorities will allow Nicaragua's Roman Catholic radio station to resume religious programming today but have continued a five-week-old ban on its newscasts. The decision, announced Thursday, marked a narrowing of last month's clampdown on critics of the revolutionary government. Thirty-eight people arrested at a violent anti-Sandinista rally July 10 are still in jail awaiting trial, but the three other news outlets that were closed since then have reopened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2007 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
The apostle of the Apocalypse is back on the airwaves. A year after his biblical prophecy show experienced its own doomsday on the Trinity Broadcasting Network, controversial and bestselling author Hal Lindsey has returned to the TBN fold. Lindsey's second coming ends a feud with network officials over his on-air criticisms of Islam.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | Associated Press
A group of religious broadcasters Tuesday developed a code of ethics for its members that would make public an annual audit and include a device to expel ministries that do not follow responsible conduct. The proposal will be presented to a special meeting of the 90-member board of directors of the National Assn. of Religious Broadcasters in Chicago on Sept. 11, said NRB President Robert A. Cook.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1989 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, Times Religion Writer
Rebounding from scandals that have felled several of television evangelism's gaudiest stars during the last two years, the National Religious Broadcasters are concentrating on setting their organizational house in order. Accountability, financial disclosure, integrity, spiritual depth and the healing of strained relationships were topics mentioned often in speeches and workshops at the broadcasters' 46th annual convention here this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990 | From Times News Services
Religious broadcasters suffering from falling ratings and dwindling public confidence are turning their eyes toward a new market--the Soviet Union. Two prominent television ministers, Robert Schuller and Pat Robertson, announced new Soviet ventures during the annual meeting this week of the National Religious Broadcasters, and others are clearly interested in penetrating the Soviet Bloc in the new age of openness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1989 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Pomona-based religious broadcaster James C. Dobson, whose half-hour "Focus on the Family" program is heard daily on 1,300 radio stations, found an unusual ally this week in his crusade against pornography: mass killer Ted Bundy. In a videotaped interview Monday, just hours before he was electrocuted Tuesday morning in a Starke, Fla., prison, Bundy told Dobson that "hard-core pornography" was "the fuel for his fantasies" and led eventually to Bundy's violent sexual crimes.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pastor of Garden Grove's Crystal Cathedral was sitting in the Soviet Embassy's formal dining room Thursday with 50 other famous Americans, straining to hear Mikhail Gorbachev's translated luncheon speech, when his companion nudged him in the arm. "You're coming up next," said Gennady Gerasimov, spokesman for the Soviet Foreign Ministry, who was seated next to the Rev. Robert H. Schuller.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1993 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Alarmed that Christian radio and television stations may be forced to air the views of homosexuals, the nation's religious broadcasters said Wednesday that they will mount a major effort to block Congress from reinstituting the fairness doctrine. The doctrine, repealed by the Federal Communications Commission in 1987 under President Reagan, is viewed as a formidable threat to plans by many of the nation's 800 Christian radio and television stations to campaign for "family values."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2006 | Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writer
Operators of Orange County's public television station vowed Monday to continue their fight to keep KOCE out of the hands of a religious broadcaster, after the governor's weekend veto of a bill crafted to keep PBS programming on the channel. That legislation would have allowed the sale of KOCE to a foundation that bears its name, despite Daystar Television Network's being the highest bidder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2004 | William Lobdell and Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writers
Trinity Broadcasting Network, a Christian television ministry shaken last month by allegations that its founder had engaged in a homosexual tryst, has dropped plans for its annual live fall telethon next week and instead will show 40 hours of reruns of previous "Praise-a-thons." The twice-annual "Praise-a-thons" have been a fundraising mainstay of the Orange County-based network since its birth 31 years ago and now bring in more than $90 million in pledges each fall and spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2004 | Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writer
Daystar Television Network has petitioned the Federal Communications Commission to block the sale of KOCE-TV to a foundation run by civic and business leaders -- an action that could stall the station's transfer of ownership by six months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
The world's largest religious broadcaster remains a bidder for Orange County's only public television station, but said Wednesday it hopes KOCE-TV will remain a PBS affiliate instead. TBN spokesman John Casoria said the televangelist organization hopes the KOCE-TV Foundation, which raises funds for Channel 50, acquires the station. "We think it would be a good thing for the county," he said. The foundation is the only one of five bidders promising to keep KOCE a PBS affiliate.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2002 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
With a lame-duck session of Congress about to begin, religious broadcasters and record labels are seeking a last-minute compromise on royalties that could clear the way for a bill to aid small Internet broadcasters. Meetings between the National Religious Broadcasters Assn. and the Recording Industry Assn. of America are expected to begin today, said Frank Breeden, president of the Nashville-based Gospel Music Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One is a student-run college station with a small volunteer staff and a dizzyingly diverse format. The other is a polished evangelical Christian station, with a signal that's twice as strong as the first. But this odd couple does have one thing in common--they both occupy 88.9 on the FM dial. And that's the problem.
NEWS
April 4, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A young heckler accused the Rev. Jimmy Swaggart of hypocrisy and was ousted from church after the fallen evangelist warned worshipers against "gloom and doubt" during Easter services Sunday. "Brother Swaggart, your hypocrisy is scornful of the government of God!" the youth, apparently about 16, called out during a brief lull in the service at the Family Worship Center built by the evangelist. He also accused Swaggart of taking "money from congregants" and being "immoral."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1990 | From Religious News Service
Three years after the Jim Bakker-PTL scandal broke, some major television evangelists are devoting even more time to fund-raising and promotion and have turned to Eastern Europe as a focus of such efforts. These are among the findings reported by Stephen Winzenburg, a scholar who has monitored religious broadcasting for a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2002 | SUZIE ST. JOHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the 135 employees working on the Seventh-day Adventist Church's worldwide radio and television programs, life just got a lot easier. Since relocating to Simi Valley seven years ago from smaller studios in Newbury Park, the media ministry has endured major construction on the $15.9-million Adventist Media Center at 101 W. Cochran St. The center became fully operational this month when the final 22,000 square feet of studio space were added.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2002
NASHVILLE--The president of the National Religious Broadcasters resigned after complaints about a newspaper interview in which he said the group should not lose focus on spiritual issues as it pursues political goals. The board of the broadcasters group voted to accept the resignation of Wayne Pederson, who had served in the post since October.
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