Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReligious Conversion
IN THE NEWS

Religious Conversion

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
July 1, 2002
"A New Way to Treat Alcoholism" (June 17) offers hope for a more scientific solution to the problem. Unfortunately, the article also shows that the medical establishment continues to act as if Alcoholics Anonymous were a self-help support group when in fact it is a religious organization. No one attending an AA meeting can escape the fact that the "cure" that is offered is basically conversion to a belief in God. Yet, despite the tent-revival ethos of it, most--if not all--alcohol and drug treatment centers rely heavily on AA to help their patients recover.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 4, 2014
Re "Seeking souls, not votes," Opinion, April 2 Holy doctrinal evolution! The Southern Baptist Convention's Russell Moore urged conservative evangelicals to shelve ardent efforts to thwart gay marriage and even to push hard for immigration reform. The religious right's reassessment of its regressive political agenda may stem from placing too much blind faith in electing conservative evangelicals. After all, in recent times such politicians - while sermonizing on gay marriage, illegal immigration and more - have wound up favoring wealthy patrons' interests much more than those of their faithful electoral base.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 7, 1994
"In the Shadow of the '80s" (July 31) can easily lead to a harmful misconception of the teachings of the Jewish faith. Such phrases as " . . . he has renounced crime and found Jesus" and "he's banking on his dramatic conversion from Judaism to make a comeback" suggest that somehow crime and Judaism go together and that only by renouncing his faith through a "dramatic" conversion could he start a crime-free life. Neither Judaism nor its daughter religion, Christianity, teaches or countenances wickedness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2008 | James Ricci, Times Staff Writer
Moshe Cotel thought he was leaving music behind when he forsook a successful career as a composer and high-ranking conservatory professor in order, in his mid-50s, to become a rabbi. Fate, however, turned out to be not entirely on board with the plan. As he finished his studies, Cotel proposed, out of laziness, to perform a rabbinical thesis rather than write one. So he was permitted to give a piano recital in which he paired traditional rabbinical monologues with pieces of classical music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL
What would you do? You're a caregiver. A month ago, you were assigned to take care of an elderly woman who's dying. It's a job most people wouldn't take because along with death comes indignity.. You must feed her and clothe her. And you have to change her diapers. But you work this minimum-wage job because you believe it's a noble profession. For 40 hours a week, you give the old woman care, companionship and, with any luck, a sense of dignity. She has no one else, so she talks with you.
NEWS
July 13, 2002 | PHILIP ZALESKI, Philip Zaleski is the editor of the annual Best Spiritual Writing series for HarperSanFrancisco and is the coauthor, with Carol Zaleski, of the forthcoming "The Language of Paradise: Prayer in Human Life and Culture."
For 1,600 years--since St. Augustine, bent over his episcopal desk in the North African port city of Hippo, completed his "Confessions" around AD 401--tales of religious conversion have been a flourishing literary form, producing through the centuries a bumper crop of classics. John Bunyan's "Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners," Leo Tolstoy's "A Confession" and C.S.
NEWS
September 29, 1999
Virginia Gilbert's account ("Cost of Conversion Was Too High for Her," Sept. 22) of the erosion of her conversion to Judaism points up a truth that is familiar to all religious movements: Religious identity requires ongoing validation. Our popular media culture, including our commercial culture, continuously provides such validation for Christian identity, often by implication. "Home for the holidays" usually implies "home for Christmas"; one's first name is also known as one's "Christian name"; saturation advertising campaigns sell merchandise to celebrate overtly Christian holidays such as Christmas and Easter, and also for less obviously Christian occasions such as Halloween and Valentine's Day; public occasions of prayer usually involve Christian content.
NEWS
November 4, 1997
Re "It Must Be What Birth Is Like" by Mary Rourke (Oct. 22): I found the article both interesting and moving, but your readers should know that conversions go the other way, as well. I was raised Roman Catholic, but I knew by age 13 that it just didn't make sense. I searched for decades for a new religion before remembering an anecdote I'd read as a child, with this punch line: "Hercules' task was to clean out the Augean stables, not to fill them back up again." I realized that I couldn't find a believable deity in any religion.
OPINION
April 4, 2014
Re "Seeking souls, not votes," Opinion, April 2 Holy doctrinal evolution! The Southern Baptist Convention's Russell Moore urged conservative evangelicals to shelve ardent efforts to thwart gay marriage and even to push hard for immigration reform. The religious right's reassessment of its regressive political agenda may stem from placing too much blind faith in electing conservative evangelicals. After all, in recent times such politicians - while sermonizing on gay marriage, illegal immigration and more - have wound up favoring wealthy patrons' interests much more than those of their faithful electoral base.
OPINION
September 15, 2002 | LORRAINE RHOADS
Why do we have juries? We have them to hear evidence presented by prosecutors and defense lawyers. Our justice system guarantees that a person charged with a crime, no matter how heinous, is entitled to a trial that is heard by a jury of his or her peers. I was a juror on the William Payton trial ("Death Penalty Is Overturned in 1980 Murder," Aug. 2). This trial came during Thanksgiving-Christmas 1982. I was working as an administrative secretary at a hospital.
OPINION
September 15, 2002 | LORRAINE RHOADS
Why do we have juries? We have them to hear evidence presented by prosecutors and defense lawyers. Our justice system guarantees that a person charged with a crime, no matter how heinous, is entitled to a trial that is heard by a jury of his or her peers. I was a juror on the William Payton trial ("Death Penalty Is Overturned in 1980 Murder," Aug. 2). This trial came during Thanksgiving-Christmas 1982. I was working as an administrative secretary at a hospital.
NEWS
July 13, 2002 | PHILIP ZALESKI, Philip Zaleski is the editor of the annual Best Spiritual Writing series for HarperSanFrancisco and is the coauthor, with Carol Zaleski, of the forthcoming "The Language of Paradise: Prayer in Human Life and Culture."
For 1,600 years--since St. Augustine, bent over his episcopal desk in the North African port city of Hippo, completed his "Confessions" around AD 401--tales of religious conversion have been a flourishing literary form, producing through the centuries a bumper crop of classics. John Bunyan's "Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners," Leo Tolstoy's "A Confession" and C.S.
HEALTH
July 1, 2002
"A New Way to Treat Alcoholism" (June 17) offers hope for a more scientific solution to the problem. Unfortunately, the article also shows that the medical establishment continues to act as if Alcoholics Anonymous were a self-help support group when in fact it is a religious organization. No one attending an AA meeting can escape the fact that the "cure" that is offered is basically conversion to a belief in God. Yet, despite the tent-revival ethos of it, most--if not all--alcohol and drug treatment centers rely heavily on AA to help their patients recover.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL
What would you do? You're a caregiver. A month ago, you were assigned to take care of an elderly woman who's dying. It's a job most people wouldn't take because along with death comes indignity.. You must feed her and clothe her. And you have to change her diapers. But you work this minimum-wage job because you believe it's a noble profession. For 40 hours a week, you give the old woman care, companionship and, with any luck, a sense of dignity. She has no one else, so she talks with you.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2000 | MICHELLE RUSHLO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Little is left of the old Kelsey Begaye. Once he was a drunk who cared about little more than his buddies and his next bottle of booze. He was a homeless man in Los Angeles who passed his days on park benches and his nights in shelters. That he would rise to become president of the nation's largest American Indian tribe seemed, if not impossible, certainly unlikely. But more than two decades later, he did just that.
NEWS
September 29, 1999
Virginia Gilbert's account ("Cost of Conversion Was Too High for Her," Sept. 22) of the erosion of her conversion to Judaism points up a truth that is familiar to all religious movements: Religious identity requires ongoing validation. Our popular media culture, including our commercial culture, continuously provides such validation for Christian identity, often by implication. "Home for the holidays" usually implies "home for Christmas"; one's first name is also known as one's "Christian name"; saturation advertising campaigns sell merchandise to celebrate overtly Christian holidays such as Christmas and Easter, and also for less obviously Christian occasions such as Halloween and Valentine's Day; public occasions of prayer usually involve Christian content.
NEWS
October 30, 1997 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lot of people complain about life in a mobile society, but at least one group--religion historians--says it isn't all bad. "Fifty years ago, whatever religion your parents were, you were," says Martin Marty, author of "Modern American Religion" (University of Chicago Press, 1996). "Today, with emigration, inter-marriage and geographic mobility, you're much freer to shop." Indeed, more Americans than ever are exploring and experiencing religious conversion.
NEWS
November 4, 1997
Re "It Must Be What Birth Is Like" by Mary Rourke (Oct. 22): I found the article both interesting and moving, but your readers should know that conversions go the other way, as well. I was raised Roman Catholic, but I knew by age 13 that it just didn't make sense. I searched for decades for a new religion before remembering an anecdote I'd read as a child, with this punch line: "Hercules' task was to clean out the Augean stables, not to fill them back up again." I realized that I couldn't find a believable deity in any religion.
NEWS
October 30, 1997 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lot of people complain about life in a mobile society, but at least one group--religion historians--says it isn't all bad. "Fifty years ago, whatever religion your parents were, you were," says Martin Marty, author of "Modern American Religion" (University of Chicago Press, 1996). "Today, with emigration, inter-marriage and geographic mobility, you're much freer to shop." Indeed, more Americans than ever are exploring and experiencing religious conversion.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|