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Religious Discrimination

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Northridge congregation that dwindled to 10 members is complaining that cash-needy regional Baptist administrators are selling its church building to a group of Hindus whom Baptist protesters referred to as "pagans" and "a cult." The Valley View Baptist Church on Roscoe Boulevard "has been sold out from under us" by the Conservative Baptist Assn.'s Southern California headquarters in Anaheim, pastor Arthur B. Houk said this week.
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NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
As Arizona awaits its governor's decision on a religious freedom bill cast by critics as anti-gay, civil rights advocates in Indiana bashed its state's own foray into controversial legislation: A measure that would exempt many faith-based organizations from a law that prevents religious discrimination in employment decisions. But while the furor grew in Arizona, Indiana lawmakers quickly nixed their measure Tuesday. "The amendment is dead,” said Republican caucus spokeswoman Tory Flynn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2011 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
Occasionally they would knock on a neighbor's door to borrow tools or ask for help with a maintenance issue. But for the most part, the Buddhist nuns on Marcon Drive in Walnut kept to the ranch-style house where they lived and worshiped. For 10 years, the young women with the shaved heads and long robes were accepted as part of an eclectic neighborhood of single-family homes, a middle school, a spacious public park and four churches — one Mormon, one Lutheran and two catering to Korean American Christians.
OPINION
November 6, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the latest example of the profound change in Americans' attitudes toward homosexuality, the Senate is moving toward a vote on a bill that would outlaw job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. But whether the Employment Non-Discrimination Act becomes law could depend on whether the Republican leadership in the House decides to alienate the very voters it will need to attract to remain competitive on a national level. Initial indications are that the Republicans, who sullied their brand with last month's disastrous shutdown of the federal government, may sabotage both the bill known as ENDA and their own prospects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
The U.S. Department of Justice filed suit Thursday against the L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, alleging a pattern of religious discrimination against employees. The suit claims that the agency discriminated against a Jewish employee by refusing to accommodate the worker's observation of the Sabbath.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE
An Orange County minister who says that the Red Cross discriminated against him because he's a Christian has lost a U.S. Supreme Court appeal. Herbert Hall of Garden Grove, who has AIDS, filed the lawsuit in 1995 after attempting to become certified as an instructor for Red Cross classes on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and HIV, the virus that causes it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1988 | From Religious News Service
The Eastman Kodak Co. has paid $16,600 to three former employees who charged the firm with religious discrimination. The three are Seventh-day Adventists, whose religion does not permit them to work from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. They said they had each worked the third shift with Saturdays off for 8 to 15 years before Kodak eliminated the third shift, thus forcing them to work on Saturdays, be fired or resign.
OPINION
May 24, 2010
France, which gave the English language the word "nuance," is offering a nuanced justification for a bill that would outlaw "concealment of the face in public." According to President Nicolas Sarkozy, the proposed measure should not be seen as an act of hostility toward Muslim women, only a small fraction of whom wear the full-face veil. Rather, the bill is designed to protect "personal dignity, particularly women's dignity," and the openness required of citizens in a republic. This rationalization, however, needlessly complicates a simple reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1993 | OTTO STRONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Muslim sergeant at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station filed a complaint against his commanding general and four other officials Wednesday, alleging that they have repeatedly violated his civil rights by discriminating against him because of his religion. The 200-page complaint against the five officials, including base commander Maj. Gen. P. Drax Williams, stems from a pattern of discrimination over the past 2 1/2 years, said Sgt.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Advocates of religious rights quickly tick off the examples. In St. Louis, "a fourth-grader was put in detention three times for whispering a prayer before eating his meal," one said. Another cited a Pennsylvania case in which a "student's lunch box was confiscated because it included a note that said: 'Jesus loves you.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2012 | Kate Mather
Imane Boudlal got a job two weeks after moving to California, a hostess position at a Disneyland Resort cafe. She didn't log many hours at first -- it was April, the slow season -- but as the summer of 2008 progressed, the 24-year-old worked more frequently as the Grand Californian Hotel & Spa's Storyteller's Cafe drew more tourists. It was also, Boudlal alleges in a lawsuit filed Monday, when her co-workers began taunting her, calling the Moroccan-born Muslim a "terrorist," a "camel" and someone who learned how to make bombs at her mosque.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2011 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
Occasionally they would knock on a neighbor's door to borrow tools or ask for help with a maintenance issue. But for the most part, the Buddhist nuns on Marcon Drive in Walnut kept to the ranch-style house where they lived and worshiped. For 10 years, the young women with the shaved heads and long robes were accepted as part of an eclectic neighborhood of single-family homes, a middle school, a spacious public park and four churches — one Mormon, one Lutheran and two catering to Korean American Christians.
WORLD
January 23, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
The intent of the anonymous Internet video was unambiguous: "This person should be killed ? and soon," read a message underneath a photo of Israel's deputy state prosecutor, Shai Nitzan. His alleged offense? "Betraying" his Jewish roots by opening a criminal inquiry into racist threats and hate speech expressed on two Israel-based Facebook pages with statements in Hebrew such as "Death to Arabs. " It was the latest, and most overtly violent, sign of what many here are calling a wave of intolerance toward people of different races, religions, orientations and viewpoints.
OPINION
May 24, 2010
France, which gave the English language the word "nuance," is offering a nuanced justification for a bill that would outlaw "concealment of the face in public." According to President Nicolas Sarkozy, the proposed measure should not be seen as an act of hostility toward Muslim women, only a small fraction of whom wear the full-face veil. Rather, the bill is designed to protect "personal dignity, particularly women's dignity," and the openness required of citizens in a republic. This rationalization, however, needlessly complicates a simple reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2009 | Gale Holland
A classroom dispute at Los Angeles City College in the emotional aftermath of Proposition 8 has given rise to a lawsuit testing the balance between 1st Amendment rights and school codes on offensive speech. Student Jonathan Lopez says his professor called him a "fascist bastard" and refused to let him finish his speech against same-sex marriage during a public speaking class last November, weeks after California voters approved the ban on such unions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2008 | H.G. Reza and Tony Barboza, Times Staff Writers
A Muslim candidate for the Irvine City Council said Thursday that a councilman's comment linking an Islamic civil rights group to terrorism has led to a death threat against him. Police said they are investigating. Attorney Todd Gallinger, a Muslim convert, said a man called his office Tuesday, about three weeks after Councilman Steven Choi spoke at a forum and urged voters not to support a candidate who worked for the Council on American-Islamic Relations.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wal-Mart Settles Discrimination Suit: The nation's largest retailer said it reached an out-of-court settlement with a former employee who charged the company with religious discrimination. The settlement includes an undisclosed payment to the Baptist employee, who said he was forced to quit after refusing to work Sundays. The settlement also calls for the Bentonville, Ark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2002 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Religious institutions cannot be held liable for discriminating against employees on the basis of religion, the California Supreme Court ruled unanimously Thursday. The state high court threw out a lawsuit by an evangelical Christian who was fired from a Catholic medical foundation after he proselytized to other employees. The court held that the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2008 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
Hindu nun Pravrajika Saradeshaprana, dressed in a saffron robe, blew into a conch shell three times, calling to worship Hindu and Episcopal religious leaders who joined Saturday to celebrate an Indian Rite Mass at St. John's Cathedral near downtown. The rare joint service included chants from the Temple Bhajan Band of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness and a moving rendition of "Bless the Lord, O My Soul" sung by the St. John's choir.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2007 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
Religion, Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka says, is the 21st century's defining issue -- just as W.E.B. Du Bois predicted race would be for the 20th century. On one level, he says, spiritual practices can enrich humankind. But religious fundamentalism is the greatest threat to peace and democracy in the world today, according to Soyinka,the Nigerian writer who won the 1986 Nobel Prize for literature.
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