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Religious Discrimination

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of plans for a Muslim school in Rancho Santa Margarita issued a statement Monday condemning racist telephone calls made last week to a group supporting the project. The statement by Citizens for a Safe Rancho Santa Margarita condemned "in the strongest possible manner any racist or discriminatory statements that may have been made by any person against the supporters of the proposed New Horizons School."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1999 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heat over a planned Muslim school in Rancho Santa Margarita intensified Friday as an Islamic organization filed a formal complaint over two anonymous hate calls. The Muslim Public Affairs Council in Los Angeles said the callers told the Islamic group: "Go back to the desert. Go back home. This place is only for Christians and Jews. Stay out of Rancho Santa Margarita."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1999 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid accusations of racism--and charges that they buckled under political pressure--Orange County planning officials Wednesday shelved a Muslim group's proposal to build a small grade school in Rancho Santa Margarita, a move that could jeopardize the project. The Planning Commission voted 2 to 1 to delay a decision on the New Horizon school until January. But Rancho Santa Margarita's residents voted earlier this month to incorporate as Orange County's 33rd city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1999 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By Orange County standards, when the Islamic Center of Southern California bought 3.4 acres of property to build a small grade school in Rancho Santa Margarita, it seemed an innocuous little development. Eight months later, it has become much more: a far-ranging tussle over traffic and ethnicity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The notice from the city of Fountain Valley smacked of religious persecution to Pastor Mariano Yeo. The congregation of about 30 Filipino and Chinese immigrants was ordered to "immediately cease" religious activity in their tiny storefront location or face jail time and thousands of dollars in fines. "It sounds like I'm living in a communist state," Yeo remembered thinking. "This is America."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A delegation of more than 200 Hindus sought a meeting with Universal Studios executives Monday to express concern over what the group considers to be derogatory depictions of Hindu deities in the action television series "Xena: Warrior Princess." Although the Los Angeles delegation was rebuffed, executives of the studio, which owns and distributes the show, said a separate group of Hindus met Monday with the "Xena" producers in New Zealand, where the show is taped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1999 | Religion News Service
The top decision-making structure of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) has created a team to monitor religious persecution and intolerance abroad. The move came as a response to the national debate over religious persecution that last year saw Congress passing legislation making the issue a key element in U.S. foreign policy.
NEWS
January 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The charred bodies of a missionary and his two sons were laid out in wooden coffins Sunday amid a wave of outrage at their killings, the first deaths in a string of attacks on Christians in India. Police arrested 49 Hindu radicals suspected of burning to death Australian Graham Stewart Staines, 58, and his sons Philip, 10, and Timothy, 8, Saturday as they slept in their utility vehicle.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | CARLA RIVERA and JOCELYN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal appeals court ruling upholding the religious rights of two Alaska landlords has sent a shock wave through legal circles in California, where antidiscrimination laws believed to be settled are now in doubt. The ruling by a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals held that the landlords were within their rights when they refused to rent to an unmarried couple because doing so violated their interpretation of Christianity.
NEWS
January 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee visited a violence-hit region in western India on Sunday and demanded severe punishment for anyone attacking houses of worship, after Hindu militants burned or demolished churches there. "Exemplary punishment should be awarded to perpetrators of such crimes," he said in Ahwa, a town in the western state of Gujarat, a region that has been marked by more than 100 acts of violence against Christians in the past year.
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