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Religious Education

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1999 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By Orange County standards, when the Islamic Center of Southern California bought 3.4 acres of property to build a small grade school in Rancho Santa Margarita, it seemed an innocuous little development. Eight months later, it has become much more: a far-ranging tussle over traffic and ethnicity.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is 10 a.m., and the kindergartners at Tarbut v'Torah Jewish day school in Irvine have finished their morning prayers. In a sky-lit computer lab, 20 small children don headphones, sign on with their own passwords and tap away quietly at a variety of educational computer programs. Nearby in a classroom, the other half of the kindergartners are on their feet. Their teacher, Ifat Meltzer, speaks no English; the Hebrew program at this school follows a full-immersion philosophy from the first day.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another test of the line separating church and state, the Supreme Court said Monday that it would decide whether parochial schools in low-income areas can receive a share of federal funds for computers, library books and instructional equipment. The case, to be heard in the fall, will affect directly about $12 million annually in federal funds. But lawyers for the parochial schools said that the impact could be far broader and touch 1 million students in religious schools nationwide.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It wasn't so long ago that Edmundo Alarcon, a 19-year-old from the San Gabriel Valley, was break-dancing with his buddies, coaching soccer, romancing his sweetheart and caring for his car--a sweet little Nissan Sentra--like so many California kids. Now he is a dark-suited disciple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1999 | Associated Press
For the third time, New York's highest court has struck down a law designed to allow a Hasidic Jewish sect to operate its own school district for disabled youngsters. The proposed school district in a semirural area north of New York City would violate the constitutional rule of separating church and state because it "has the primary effect of advancing one religion over others," the Court of Appeals ruled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1999 | Religion News Service
More men are studying to become Catholic priests, according to a new survey that shows their numbers to be at the highest level in six years. The survey will be published in May by a research group at Georgetown University in Washington. It was first reported by USA Today. Among the reasons for the increase is a larger number of men in their 30s and older who are entering Catholic seminaries after leaving secular careers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The pastor from an Assembly of God church in Bell came to combat crime. The youth minister from Genesis Foursquare Church in Highland Park came to study the economics of unemployment. A pastor from Messiah Foursquare Church in Oxnard came to expand his ministry's homeless program. But Edgar Chacon, associate pastor of Fairview Heights Baptist Church in Inglewood, came to weave a dream. "Let me tell you about my dream," he said with a beckoning gaze.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1999 | Associated Press
After an extended shutdown during a ruinous civil war, Liberia Baptist Theological Seminary in Monrovia has been reopened with 95 students, according to the Southern Baptist Convention press service. The campus was closed when the war began in 1990. Peacekeeping troops from Ghana lived there and protected it from looters. The school offered classes at a temporary location between 1993 and 1996. Liberia and China are the oldest mission fields of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1999 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Graziano Marcheschi of Chicago wants to introduce people to alternatives to the traditional poker-faced prayer in a church pew. When he prays, it's with a flying leap, a dip or a shimmy. His seminar on liturgical dance is just one of the hundreds of workshops offered at the annual Religious Education Congress in Anaheim this weekend and is a testament to Catholicism's push to reach out to youth.
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