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Religious Education

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2002 | From Religion News Service
Twenty-five years ago, just about every seminarian on this campus was a young man who spoke such fluent Greek that he could pass for native in the cafes of Athens. Today, more than 20% of students at Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology have no Greek roots.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2002 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing up in Chicago in the 1930s, Lisa Greene's grandfather changed his name from Greenstein to disguise his Jewish heritage. "And now I'm at a school just for Jews," said Lisa, a senior at Tarbut V'Torah Community Day School in Irvine. "It's amazing how things have changed. You can be Jewish so much easier now, and practice what you believe and not hide it." For an increasing number of Jewish students, practicing what you believe has come to include attending a Jewish high school.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2002 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few weeks after the Supreme Court upheld the use of school vouchers, a Florida judge ruled Monday that the nation's only statewide voucher program violates the Florida Constitution because it gives tax money to religious schools. The decision was a major setback for Republican Gov. Jeb Bush, who had numbered the 1999 voucher law among the greatest achievements of his governorship.
NATIONAL
July 19, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Washington college student who wants to use a state-funded scholarship to study "pastoral ministries" must be allowed to do so despite a state ban on using government funds for religious instruction, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday. The 2-1 decision comes less than a month after a different 9th Circuit panel drew vociferous criticism nationally by ruling in another case involving church and state that the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2002 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of an Orange County-based trust has withdrawn an offer of a gift worth millions of dollars to the private university that owns Trinity Law School in Santa Ana. William Welty, trustee of the Joshua Davidson Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust in Yorba Linda, said the trust had planned to give Trinity International University about $7 million annually so its divinity school could be tuition-free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2002 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 34-year-old Jewish businessman has launched a program--only the fourth of its kind in the nation--to bring a top Israeli scholar to Orange County each year for a monthlong series of lectures at synagogues and universities and to community groups. The scholar-in-residence program, the brainchild of Arie Katz, general counsel to a Newport Beach fitness firm, will kick off later this month with Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Avigdor Shinan as its inaugural lecturer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | Associated Press
A coalition dissatisfied with public schools that serve black students announced plans to open four tuition-free schools within weeks. St. Louis Academies said it had secured a $20-million loan, leased four buildings, and hired a former public school superintendent and 75 teachers. Initially, the schools will meet costs through a patchwork of federal programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | Associated Press
Courses have begun for 120 students at the new law school at the University of St. Thomas, a Roman Catholic institution that plans to take a faith-based approach to learning the legal system. "While most places study the law based on reasoning, faith-based schools integrate a belief system with reasoning," said the dean, David Link, formerly dean of the University of Notre Dame law school.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Glen Coughlin will sign. Gladly. Oh yes, says the dean of Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula, he fully backs the Vatican requirement for Roman Catholic theologians to pledge, in writing, that they will teach "authentic Catholic doctrine." Call this truth in advertising, Coughlin says: Those billed as Catholic theologians should accurately present Catholic teachings. John Connolly will not sign. Absolutely not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2001 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court has ruled that a Seventh-day Adventist college can participate in a state program that pays for courses and programs at public and private colleges. The state failed to prove that Columbia Union College in Takoma Park, Md., was "pervasively sectarian" and therefore ineligible for state money, the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled June 26.
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