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Religious Freedom

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The notice from the city of Fountain Valley smacked of religious persecution to Pastor Mariano Yeo. The congregation of about 30 Filipino and Chinese immigrants was ordered to "immediately cease" religious activity in its tiny storefront location or face jail time and thousands of dollars in fines. "It sounds like I'm living in a Communist state," Yeo remembered thinking. "This is America."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1991 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the thousands of Orange County Jews who began to celebrate the eight days of Hanukkah on Sunday, some will have a special appreciation for the festival's theme of religious freedom. They are Jewish emigres from the Soviet Union, some of whom may be celebrating Hanukkah for the first time, Jewish leaders said. "Many have never heard Hanukkah songs, a Hanukkah prayer or the Hanukkah story," said Shula Kalir-Merton, cantor at Temple Beth El in Laguna Niguel.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Despite imminent limits on religious freedom in Russia, U.S. church and government leaders said Tuesday that Russian government and church officials are offering assurances that pending legislation will not be strictly enforced. Those assurances, communicated in recent meetings in Geneva and at the Hague--as well as similar promises offered in Moscow to U.S. government officials--have prompted some U.S.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A majority of the House voted Thursday for a "religious freedom" constitutional amendment that would allow prayers in public schools, religious icons on government property and the use of tax dollars to pay for parochial schools. But the 224-203 vote fell 65 short of the two-thirds majority needed for passage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1991 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Amid the swift currents of change in the Soviet Union this week, experts said they were confident that gains in religious freedom made during the leadership of Mikhail S. Gorbachev would not be easily lost. Communist atheism no longer holds the Soviet people's trust and thus cannot be pushed on them to take the place of religion, said Rabbi Arthur Schneier, president of the interfaith Appeal of Conscience Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2000 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
When a U.S. interfaith commission this month named Sudan as the "world's most violent abuser" of religious freedom, it stepped smack into one of the nation's most prickly challenges to Muslim-Christian relations. In its report, the U.S.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | JUDY PASTERNAK and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rebellious inmates who have held a cellblock at a maximum-security prison since Sunday released a second hostage Friday after one of their leaders was granted television time to list their demands in a dramatic broadcast from the prison's recreation yard. The inmate spokesman, identifying himself as Abdul Samad Humein, shouted at cameras placed outside a double chain-link fence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2000 | BENJAMIN J. HUBBARD, Benjamin J. Hubbard is professor and chairman of the department of comparative religion at Cal State Fullerton. He is writing a book on religious diversity
The historic first meeting of many of the world's religious and spiritual leaders at the United Nations Aug. 28-31 made clear both the promise and the challenges to interfaith cooperation in the century ahead. Over 1,000 high-ranking religionists listened to prayers, music and speeches, and took part in seminars dealing with religion's role in promoting peace, eradicating poverty and halting environmental degradation.
NEWS
August 3, 2008 | Anthony Deutsch, Associated Press
The Muslim hard-liners arrived just before midnight armed with stones, clubs and flammable liquid. Townspeople cowering in fear heard chants of "Destroy! Destroy!" and watched the mob set ablaze the mosque of an offshoot Islamic sect that the attackers view as heretical. "This time they destroyed our property. If they come back, I'm afraid they will target us," said Rina Nurlinawati, a member of the Ahmadiyah sect who was among witnesses to the burning down of the group's mosque in Sukabumi, a quiet hillside town on Indonesia's main island of Java.
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