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Religious Goods

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April 17, 1987 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Here in a wooden shed on the desert grounds of St. Andrew's Priory, Benedictine monks mold clay into 60,000 saints, angels and other heavenly characters that are shipped to gift shops all over the country. Father Werner P. deMorchoven, a 73-year-old former missionary to China who is now in charge of promotion for the priory, reports that angels are in great demand this spring.
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WORLD
August 30, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Even holy water from the Roman Catholic shrine at Lourdes, France, can't get by airport security screening passengers for suspicious liquids. Passengers on a new Vatican-backed charter airline had to hand over containers of water collected at Our Lady of Lourdes Cathedral to security officials at the airport in southern France before boarding a return flight to Rome, officials for Mistral Air and the airport said, the Italian news agency Apcom reported.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A replica of the ancient Jewish Tabernacle--the tent housing the Ark of the Covenant and described in great detail in Exodus--is drawing thousands of the devout and the curious this week to a field by Calvary Chapel Costa Mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2007 | Francisco Vara-Orta, Times Staff Writer
Janet Fanucchi has made jewelry since her teenage years. But it wasn't until three years ago that, at age 50, she made her first rosary -- Indian amber beads with a golden vintage cross -- and came to understand its ability to forge an intimate connection between human and divine. "I've always loved the rosary," Fanucchi said. "It's a spiritual experience to make one." Fanucchi joined the guild at St.
NEWS
August 12, 1991 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Senior bow priest Perry Tsadiasi bends down to embrace the long, brown-bagged bundle lying on the table. Clutching it to his cheek, Tsadiasi whispers a prayer in the gentle, confidential murmur of a parent comforting a lost child. The religious elder takes the bundle in his arms, slowly circles the room while repeating the chant and pauses at the doorway, where an offering of sacred cornmeal has been strewn in his path. The purification rite is complete.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When 8-year-old Brad Salter first stepped up to blow the shofar at Jewish High Holy Day services, he was a significant exception to the tradition of having pious older men perform the honor. It was 1960, and the boy had no way of knowing that he would become a virtuoso on the ram's horn, beginning a three-decade family tradition.
NEWS
April 6, 1998 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Reacting to steady growth in the nation's Muslim population, suppliers of consumer goods from meat to cosmetics are moving to meet a growing demand for products that comply with Islamic dietary laws. In Los Angeles and Orange counties, where an estimated 400,000 Muslims live, the number of grocery stores specializing in Islamic food, known as halal--an Arabic word meaning "permitted"--have doubled over the last three years.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Priceless church artifacts brought home after World War II by a U.S. soldier will be returned to a German church under an agreement signed by the soldier's heirs. The settlement, announced in Dallas, means the family of army veteran Joe Meador will be paid less than $1 million for the relics and a church lawsuit against them will be dropped, said their lawyer, Randal Mathis. The gold, silver, ivory and crystal artifacts date to emperors Charlemagne (768-814) and Otto I (936-973).
NEWS
August 21, 1989
A sacred pole topped with a human scalp and said to have the power of life and unity was presented to the Omaha Tribe in Macy, Neb., after being held 101 years in a Boston museum. The pole, believed to be more than 300 years old, is a symbol of unity for the American Indian tribe. Its last keeper, Yellow Smoke, entrusted it to the Peabody Museum at Harvard University because he doubted younger generations of Omahas would cherish it. Tribal officials recently negotiated its return.
BOOKS
December 25, 2005 | Nick Owchar
LONG before Dan Brown's bestselling thriller "The Da Vinci Code," there was "Holy Blood, Holy Grail," (now reissued by Delacorte Press: 512 pp., $35), an attempt in nonfiction to argue that the true story of Jesus has been covered up by an elaborate conspiracy. The Holy Grail is said to be the cup used by Jesus at the Last Supper -- an elusive, mystical object sought by questing knights for centuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2005 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
Once a mezuza in every room was a sure sign of an observant Jewish household. The less religious usually hung a single mezuza -- a tiny scroll of Hebrew scripture in a protective case -- on the right side of the front door. But today, even Jews who don't keep kosher are filling their houses with mezuzas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A replica of the ancient Jewish Tabernacle--the tent housing the Ark of the Covenant and described in great detail in Exodus--is drawing thousands of the devout and the curious this week to a field by Calvary Chapel Costa Mesa.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Thieves have stolen the skull of a 14th century Spanish pope from a ruined palace in a remote town in Spain--and are reportedly demanding a ransom. The skull of Benedicto XIII was stolen in April from a boarded-up palace that once belonged to a local count, a Civil Guard officer in Sabinan said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1999 | Associated Press
Centuries-old sacred bone fragments and the reliquary box in which they were displayed have disappeared from a Greek Orthodox Church. The pebble-sized fragments date from the 3rd and 4th centuries. "These are very highly venerated," said the Rev. Philip Armstrong, priest of St. Katherine Greek Orthodox Church. "The relics of saints are considered to be sources for healings, for answered prayers and for the blessing of premises. It is really a grave loss spiritually to us."
BUSINESS
April 11, 1998 | Bloomberg News
For Israeli entrepreneur Dani Yasoor, who bottled Jordan River water and sold it to Christians in the U.S., it only made sense to take another product associated with the Holy Land and sell it in the Bible Belt. Yasoor, a food importer and a partner in Galilee Splendor Ltd. of Miami, is seeking to turn unleavened bread into a crossover hit with Christians. Calling the matzo Bible Bread, he's pitching it as the "original fast food."
BUSINESS
April 11, 1998 | Bloomberg News
For Israeli entrepreneur Dani Yasoor, who bottled Jordan River water and sold it to Christians in the U.S., it only made sense to take another product associated with the Holy Land and sell it in the Bible Belt. Yasoor, a food importer and a partner in Galilee Splendor Ltd. of Miami, is seeking to turn unleavened bread into a crossover hit with Christians. Calling the matzo Bible Bread, he's pitching it as the "original fast food."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been called the "linen enigma," and the "most intensely studied artifact of modern science." Detractors label it an "obvious fraud," and some religious scholars weigh in with a more generous "pious forgery." Now, a local gynecologist has brought the mystery, the history and the nasty disagreement surrounding the Shroud of Turin to Orange County--more than 6,000 miles from the town where the real thing lies protected in an Italian cathedral. Dr.
NEWS
April 6, 1998 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Reacting to steady growth in the nation's Muslim population, suppliers of consumer goods from meat to cosmetics are moving to meet a growing demand for products that comply with Islamic dietary laws. In Los Angeles and Orange counties, where an estimated 400,000 Muslims live, the number of grocery stores specializing in Islamic food, known as halal--an Arabic word meaning "permitted"--have doubled over the last three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1997 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relics of the saints--purported pieces of their bones, flesh or clothing or reputed artifacts from Jesus' life--have had a long history of veneration in the Roman Catholic Church, although they are religiously out of fashion today. But despite broad skepticism in Catholicism about the historical validity of many relics, the San Fernando Mission archival center has opened its first public exhibit of some 300 that had been in storage for years at the 200-year-old mission.
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