Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReligious Groups
IN THE NEWS

Religious Groups

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey
Faced with fierce opposition from religious organizations, the Obama administration will make changes to its new rule requiring employers to offer free contraceptive coverage in their healthcare plans, senior administration officials said Friday morning. The changes will allow more religiously affiliated groups to opt out of the mandate. Employees at Catholic and other religious hospitals, charities and universities would have access to free birth control through their insurance companies, under the change the president signed off on Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
What do Jesus and Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard have in common? According to authors Reza Aslan and Lawrence Wright, there are indeed commonalities. Fans and avid readers flocked to the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday to hear Aslan and Wright speak during an hourlong panel moderated by Times Editor-in-Chief Davan Maharaj. “You will leave enlightened, I hope,” Maharaj said when introducing the panel. Aslan, author of “Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth,” and Wright, author of “Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood & the Prison of Belief,” delved deeper into parallels between the two religious figures featured in their books.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Noam N. Levey
President Obama said new changes to a health insurance mandate will accommodate concerns about religious freedom without compromising healthcare access for women, even as he complained that critics had turned the mandate into a “political football.” “Religious liberty will be protected and a law that provides free preventative care will not discriminate,” Obama said as he announced changes to a rule that had sparked a backlash from Catholic...
NATIONAL
April 4, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Mississippi's governor signed into law Thursday a measure that allows individuals and organizations to sue the government over laws that they feel thwart their ability to practice religion. “I am proud to sign the Mississippi Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which will protect the individual religious freedom of Mississippians of all faiths from government interference,” Gov. Phil Bryant said in a statement.  Civil rights groups and advocates of the gay community had opposed the measure and believe that when it takes effect in July it could lead to increased discrimination of gays and lesbians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2009 | Larry B. Stammer
When a foot-long chunk of water-damaged plaster fell from the domed sanctuary ceiling at Wilshire Boulevard Temple last year, shattering in front of the pulpit below, the room was quickly cordoned off. Had the incident last October occurred during Saturday Shabbat services instead of three days earlier, the story might have been different. "Fortunately, it happened when the sanctuary was empty," Rabbi Steven Leder said. The historic synagogue already had launched a major building program that included the restoration of the 1929 edifice with its distinctive sanctuary and Moorish dome.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
As officials in Arizona and the rest of the nation continue to wrestle with the legal and legislative issues connected to same-sex marriage, a new poll shows that support for allowing gays to marry has rapidly increased since such unions first became legal more than a decade ago, with inroads made even among the religious, once a bastion of opposition. About 53% of the random sample of 4,509 Americans surveyed by the nonpartisan Public Religion Research Institute said they supported same sex marriage, up from 32% in 2003, when Massachusetts became the first state to legalize it. The poll, released on Wednesday, was carried out between Nov. 12 and Dec. 18, 2013, by telephone and has a margin of error of 1.7 percentage points, the group said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking advantage of the national spotlight on the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles, religious groups across Southern California are planning interfaith protests on a host of issues--police brutality, juvenile justice, immigrant rights and the death penalty. Roman Catholics, Jews, Methodists and Episcopalians will join for many of the planned worship services, marches and rallies to express strength and solidarity and to exercise what they consider a moral obligation to speak out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Ventura County Supervisor Steve Bennett is asking for a review of policy governing religious groups' use of county buildings. An update is needed because the U.S. Supreme Court in June issued a ruling that could make it tougher for religious groups to use county facilities, Bennett said. "We ought to make sure our policies are consistent with that ruling," he said. The Ventura-based supervisor will ask his colleagues Tuesday to approve a review.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2003
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft endorsed giving religious organizations government money for social services, stepping into a debate critics say is unsuitable for the nation's top law enforcement official. Speaking in Denver to a conference of religious groups, Ashcroft said the government has discriminated against such groups and President Bush is determined that they should have access to federal money to provide services.
NEWS
September 1, 1989 | From Reuters
This nominally Marxist government says it will let faith healers, handicapped people and members of religious groups seek parliamentary seats for the first time in elections this month. Peasants and members of scholarly societies also may field candidates in elections Sept. 24, the Congolese Workers' Party decided at a special meeting Wednesday. The party set quotas, which were not announced, for each of the groups and said the change would make Parliament more representative of society.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
As officials in Arizona and the rest of the nation continue to wrestle with the legal and legislative issues connected to same-sex marriage, a new poll shows that support for allowing gays to marry has rapidly increased since such unions first became legal more than a decade ago, with inroads made even among the religious, once a bastion of opposition. About 53% of the random sample of 4,509 Americans surveyed by the nonpartisan Public Religion Research Institute said they supported same sex marriage, up from 32% in 2003, when Massachusetts became the first state to legalize it. The poll, released on Wednesday, was carried out between Nov. 12 and Dec. 18, 2013, by telephone and has a margin of error of 1.7 percentage points, the group said.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
As Arizona awaits its governor's decision on a religious freedom bill cast by critics as anti-gay, civil rights advocates in Indiana bashed its state's own foray into controversial legislation: A measure that would exempt many faith-based organizations from a law that prevents religious discrimination in employment decisions. But while the furor grew in Arizona, Indiana lawmakers quickly nixed their measure Tuesday. "The amendment is dead,” said Republican caucus spokeswoman Tory Flynn.
OPINION
February 23, 2014
Re "A humane stance on dying kids," Opinion, Feb. 20 Unsettling decisions regarding a child's "right to die" and whether his or her life measures up anymore must be determined carefully. Members of a medical and psychosocial team, as well as the patient and patient's family, should be included in the process. With guidance by trained professionals, the process of listening to a sick child's fears and frustrations can help to decipher sometimes subtle differences between depression, cognitive disorganization, feelings of hopelessness and a desire to hasten one's own death.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Laugh all you want at those old public-access television clips of the late Dr. Gene Scott, the eccentric televangelist who sometimes wore two pairs of glasses at once and shouted at viewers to "Get on the telephone!" whenever his fundraising totals ebbed. He and his Los Angeles Universal Cathedral, operating from the 1927 United Artists Theatre in downtown Los Angeles, turned out to be surprisingly good friends to historic preservation. And say what you will about the quixotic plan hatched in 2000 by Bishop Kenneth Ulmer of the Faithful Central Bible Church in Inglewood to turn the Forum, once home to Magic Johnson's "Showtime" Lakers and Wayne Gretzky's Kings, into a thriving combination of mega-church and high-end arena.
OPINION
January 5, 2014
Re "Deep division persists on birth control," Jan. 3 Where will it end? Even as wondrous advances in medicine have continually improved our health, various religions have striven to inject their beliefs into doctor-patient relationships. Faith-based objections have been lodged against inoculations, blood transfusions, birth control, abortion, end-of-life treatment and so on. Must every future medical innovation be compelled to run a religious gauntlet? Will every newly concocted religion be permitted to challenge medical procedures long deemed essential and effective?
NATIONAL
December 31, 2013 | By David G. Savage and Maeve Reston
WASHINGTON - Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor granted a temporary exemption late Tuesday to a small group of Catholic nuns that shields it from having to comply with a part of President Obama's healthcare law that requires it to provide contraceptive coverage in its insurance plans. She acted on an emergency appeal from lawyers for the group who said the nuns faced "draconian fines" beginning on New Year's Day if they failed to comply with the law widely known as Obamacare. Sotomayor gave the government until Friday to file a response in the case.
NEWS
December 9, 1995 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a heated debate that pitted religious leaders against political kingmakers, the upper house of the Japanese parliament on Friday passed a government-proposed bill to tighten control over religious groups. Japan's ruling coalition initiated the legislation to revise the 1951 Religious Corporations Law after a deadly nerve-gas attack on the Tokyo subway system last March, allegedly by the Aum Supreme Truth religious cult.
NEWS
January 27, 1985 | United Press International
Charitable giving by religious organizations is greater than that of either private foundations or corporations and totals at least $8.5 billion a year, the Council on Foundations said Saturday. In addition, religious philanthropy increasingly is targeted to social change, a study by the council said. According to the survey, religious groups in 1983 gave away at least $7.5 billion at the national and regional level of organization.
WORLD
July 9, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
CAIRO - As Muslim Brotherhood supporters mourned victims of a deadly clash with Egyptian soldiers, a senior Islamist official on Tuesday rejected a military-backed timetable for fresh elections, saying it "brings the country back to square one. " Egypt's interim president, Judge Adly Mahmoud Mansour, issued a timetable late Monday calling for amending the constitution and holding parliamentary and presidential elections within six months. Within 15 days, Mansour is due to appoint a committee of jurists and professors to revise the constitution, which the military suspended last week when it ousted the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohamed Morsi from the presidency.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
GRAPEVINE, Texas - Protesters in Boy Scout uniforms staked out sides of a resort-lined street in this Dallas suburb where national Scouting leaders were meeting Wednesday to consider lifting the ban on gay Scouts. On one side, handmade signs cried "Save our Scouts" and "Boy Scouts morally straight. " Inside a hotel on the other side, signs called for "Inclusive Scouting" and "Scouting for all. " Even after the highly anticipated vote by the Boy Scout national council Thursday, the battle over gays in Scouting will be far from over, both sides vowed.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|