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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1999 | Religion News Service
A new report from the government of Vietnam says progress has been made over the past year in assuring religious freedom but acknowledged that problems remain. "Progress has been made in the operation of religious organizations in accordance with the law and the common interest of the nation," Le Quang Vinh, head of the government's Committee on Religion, was quoted as saying Wednesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2010 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The concept of history in the Middle Ages was not what it is today, as visitors to the J. Paul Getty Museum's new exhibition of manuscripts will see. In an eye-popping image from "Romance of Alexander," a book made in the 1290s, an unknown artist illustrated a yarn about Alexander the Great making an underwater expedition. Enthroned in a glass diving bell, below a whale that gobbles up much of the pictorial space, the regal explorer calmly observes a colony of nude people, earthly beasts and fruit trees living at the bottom of the sea. "The artist really had fun with this," says Getty curator Elizabeth Morrison, who organized the exhibition with Anne D. Hedeman, an art history professor at the University of Illinois in Urbana- Champaign.
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NEWS
April 16, 1995 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months ago, the Vatican released a 179-page letter--an encyclical--from Pope John Paul II to the bishops of the Roman Catholic Church. It was a complex, tightly reasoned condemnation of moral relativism and situational ethics--a call for strict adherence to the principle that some acts are just plain wrong ("intrinsically evil") and cannot be justified by extenuating circumstances, no matter how compelling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2008 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
The Psalms, says theologian Eugene H. Peterson, are God's gift to those who want to learn how to pray. "If we wish to develop our entire heart, mind, soul and strength, the Psalms are necessary," the author of the bestselling "Message Bible" writes in "Answering God: The Psalms as Tools for Prayer." "We cannot bypass the Psalms."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1992 | From Associated Press
For more than half a century, the Bible League has been quietly distributing millions of Bibles and other religious literature to churches, prisons and hospitals throughout the world. When William Chapman, a Chicago-area businessman, founded the nonprofit organization in Walkerton, Ind., in 1938, he had just 1,000 Bibles bought with his savings. He and his wife, Betty, began canvassing their neighborhood and distributing the Bibles to anyone promising to read them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1993 | JOHN DART
The biblical account of Israelites held in bondage by ancient Egypt--a vital element of the Exodus story that has given hope of liberation to centuries of Jews and African-Americans--was challenged as unhistorical by a black scholar at a recent public symposium at Cal State Northridge. "There is no historical evidence of Egyptians holding the nation of the Hebrews captive," said Maulana Karenga, chairman of Cal State Long Beach's department of black studies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
In the 18th century world of religious literature, there was a special place reserved for a collection of engravings and treatises called "Ceremonies and Religious Customs of All the Peoples of the World": It was on the "Index Librorum Prohibitorum"-- the Vatican's list of prohibited books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1993 | JOHN DART
The 1970s and '80s saw Buddhism carve itself a slender slice of the American pie of religious diversity. To a small extent, U.S. Buddhist ranks grew with American-born converts captivated by meditation, Eastern philosophy and the tranquil way of the Buddha. Many more adherents were young immigrants from Korea, Vietnam, Thailand and other Asian countries where Buddhism was simply part of the culture.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting in a case that could shape the future health of the military reserves, the Supreme Court said Tuesday that it would decide whether workers have an absolute right to leave their jobs for lengthy training as reservists. The decision, due next year, will not affect the nearly 200,000 reservists called up to active duty because of the Persian Gulf War. Federal law guarantees reservists ordered to active duty the right to return to jobs without penalty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Eisenman's five-bedroom home is at the vortex of an intellectual whirlwind of biblical proportions. Its floors are piled high with boxes of yellowed documents. Its tables are covered with pages containing obscure passages. And everywhere an atmosphere of creative disorder prevails, a sort of rumbling of the mind and spirit borne of a feverish true belief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
In the 18th century world of religious literature, there was a special place reserved for a collection of engravings and treatises called "Ceremonies and Religious Customs of All the Peoples of the World": It was on the "Index Librorum Prohibitorum"-- the Vatican's list of prohibited books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2007 | Steve Padilla and Theo Milonopoulos, Times Staff Writers
U.S. Catholic bishops this week released a statement on faith and politics, as they have for more than 30 years, that urged Roman Catholics to follow church teachings as they participate in the political process. The statement, titled "Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship: A Call to Political Responsibility," was posted online Wednesday at usccb.org and prompted swift reactions, both positive and negative, from a variety of Catholic groups.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A Koran written in 1203, believed to be the oldest known complete copy, has sold for more than $2.3 million at an auction. The holy book, which had been estimated to sell for up to $715,000, fetched $2,327,300 at Tuesday's auction in London, Christie's said, calling it a record auction price for a Koran or any type of Islamic manuscript. A nearly complete, 10th century Kufic Koran, thought to be from North Africa or the near East, sold for $1,870,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2007 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
Speaking with mutual respect and sensitivity, prominent Christian, Jewish and Muslim scholars and clergy from around the country met in Los Angeles this week to "wrestle" with what one rabbi described as the "dark side" of the three faith traditions. Experts cited "problematic" passages from the Hebrew Scripture, the New Testament and the Koran that assert the superiority of one belief system over others. As an example, the Rt. Rev.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
School officials in Yorktown did not violate a teacher's 1st Amendment rights when they removed Christian-themed postings from his classroom after parents complained, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. The postings included a flier publicizing the National Day of Prayer, a depiction of George Washington praying at Valley Forge, and articles about President Bush's religious faith and former Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft's prayer meetings with his employees.
WORLD
January 26, 2006 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Pope Benedict XVI on Wednesday issued his first encyclical, using the most important form of papal writing to expound upon the meaning of God's love, erotic love between humans, and the relationship between the two. Physical love, reduced to pure sex, becomes a debased commodity, "a mere 'thing' to be bought and sold," the pope wrote; it must be enhanced by spiritual, selfless love for God and for one's neighbor to achieve a higher and full meaning.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
As mainline churches try to reconcile notions of modern sexuality with Bible-based traditions, controversies are brewing over whether sexual "thou shalt nots" should be changed to "maybe thou can." "Sexuality is as powerful an issue now as slavery was in the 19th Century," says the Rev. Marvin Ellison Jr., an ethics professor who helped draft a tradition-flouting report that urges greater sexual freedom for Presbyterians. "There's no question about it," agrees pollster George Gallup Jr.
NEWS
March 4, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The provocative Jesus Seminar on Sunday concluded six years of voting on what the Jesus of history most likely said, ruling out about 80% of words attributed to him in the Gospels and emerging with the picture of a prophet-sage who told parables and made pithy comments. Virtually all of Jesus' words in the Gospel of John were voted down by scholars meeting in Sonoma, including a pulpit favorite, 3:16, "For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son. . . ."
WORLD
July 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
One of the world's oldest copies of the Koran and thousands of other rare Islamic texts were destroyed Monday in a suspected arson that destroyed Kashmir's oldest school. The loss of the 105-year-old Islamia Higher Secondary School and its 30,000-book library shocked many in the disputed Himalayan territory. Hundreds of the school's students and other people marched in protest of the blaze in Srinagar, the summer capital of India's Jammu and Kashmir state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2004 | Joy Buchanan, Times Staff Writer
In some local bookstores, teen boys can find a glossy publication filled with music reviews, top 10 lists and advice about dating. Its photos show pretty girls, skateboarders, guys with cornrows and teens cruising in convertibles. But it's not a magazine. It's a Bible. Or actually, what its publisher has dubbed a "biblezine." Titled Refuel, it was recently released by Thomas Nelson, one of the nation's largest Bible publishers.
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