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NEWS
June 30, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court gave religious-rights activists two important victories Thursday, ruling that the government may not deny funding or free-speech protections to groups simply because of their religious beliefs. Instead, the justices insisted that officials follow a "neutral" and "evenhanded" approach to matters of religion so that students or church groups are not put at a disadvantage because of their faith.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each bearing a worn religious book no longer usable, about 250 Jewish school students Tuesday helped Mt. Sinai Memorial Park revive the Judaic tradition of burying sacred texts--taking their theme from Islam's Prophet Mohammed. "We are the people of the book" was an oft-repeated refrain during a 45-minute service written for the occasion after research turned up no record of a Jewish ritual.
NEWS
April 16, 1995 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months ago, the Vatican released a 179-page letter--an encyclical--from Pope John Paul II to the bishops of the Roman Catholic Church. It was a complex, tightly reasoned condemnation of moral relativism and situational ethics--a call for strict adherence to the principle that some acts are just plain wrong ("intrinsically evil") and cannot be justified by extenuating circumstances, no matter how compelling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1995
Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz of Israel, one of the world's foremost Talmudic scholars, will make a rare appearance in Los Angeles on Monday during a public address on the Passover theme of "The Fourth Child." Steinsaltz, the winner of the Israel Prize--that nation's highest honor--is best known for the work that he and a team of scholars have undertaken to translate into English the Talmud, a sweeping multivolume collection of Jewish law and learning completed in the 6th Century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1995 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Married just a year, a wealthy woman claims her estranged husband wed only for money, and so is not entitled to any of her family's fortune in their divorce. * The judge agrees that there was implied fraud, denies the husband's claim and in his ruling recommends written, prenuptial agreements. A typical domestic dispute, except that the judge was a 16th Century Polish rabbi, relying on a compendium of law and legal commentary called the Talmud that already stretched back more than 2,500 years.
NEWS
March 28, 1995
Pope John Paul II, who believes that morality is an absolute with no room for grays, delivers a sermon on righteousness Thursday in the form of a major encyclical. Written to refute what John Paul calls the "culture of death," the papal teaching will revisit contentious areas of moral debate, including abortion.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bits of papyrus in an Oxford University library may be the oldest fragments of the New Testament Gospels and may even be a contemporary account of the life of Jesus Christ, the London Times reported Saturday. Biblical scholars have traditionally believed that three scraps of text of the Gospel according to St. Matthew, inscribed in Greek, were written in the late 2nd Century, or considerably after Christ's death, which is usually given as AD 33.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1994 | Religious News Service
The Tibetan Book of the Dead is full of instructions from the Buddhist perspective about how to manage a skillful passage into the next life. But one of the best ways to prepare for death, according to Buddhist scholar Robert Thurman, is to live a good life. Here are a few suggestions on how to prepare for the "final voyage," culled from Thurman's commentaries on the Book of the Dead: * Become informed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1994 | From Religious News Service
Death, in Western culture, comes in an instant and signals the end of things: cessation of pain; swift release from disease; a slip into oblivion; a flat line on the oscilloscope. But to the Buddhists of Tibet, for whom dying is an art, a science and the ultimate test of an individual's courage and compassion, death is a much more complicated process.
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