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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
The British Library has found what it believes to be Buddhism's equivalent of the Dead Sea Scrolls, written on strips of birch bark dating from as early as the second century. The manuscripts on 60 separate fragments of various sizes include some of Buddha's poems, sermons and treatises.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1996 | From Religion News Service
An informal prayer liturgy, designed for Christians and Jews to use together in settings ranging from living rooms to a church or synagogue, has been published by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago. The prayer book was written by Rabbi Leon Klenicki, director of interfaith affairs of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, and the Rev. Bruce Robbins, general secretary of the United Methodist Commission on Christian Unity.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's the difference between a guardian angel and a guardian deity? Where did Soka Gakki come from? When is a cathedral not a basilica? And who says the human potential movement is a religion? Trivia buffs intrigued by such questions might find the new "Dictionary of Religion" (HarperCollins) hard to put down. Here are 1,154 pages of religious history and biography, psychology and sociology condensed to bite-size pieces.
NEWS
October 20, 1995 | ROY RIVENBURG
The old joke among Protestants, says author Gary R. Habermas, is that Catholics have finally published a book called "What the Bible Says About Purgatory." But if you open it up, the pages are blank. Catholic scholars concede their case is circumstantial. But they do cite several intriguing passages: * Paul's first letter to the Corinthians hints at a post-mortem scenario in which believers' lives are tested by fire. "If someone's work burns, he will suffer loss," the apostle wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1995 | from Religion News Service
The U.S. Supreme Court narrowed the separation between church and state Thursday in two decisions pitting free speech rights against a constitutional ban on state-supported religion. But the two rulings--allowing state university funding of a religious publication and the display of a religious symbol in a public park--were narrowly focused as the court sidestepped requests by conservative groups to change the theory it uses to decide church-state cases.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court gave religious-rights activists two important victories Thursday, ruling that the government may not deny funding or free-speech protections to groups simply because of their religious beliefs. Instead, the justices insisted that officials follow a "neutral" and "evenhanded" approach to matters of religion so that students or church groups are not put at a disadvantage because of their faith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each bearing a worn religious book no longer usable, about 250 Jewish school students Tuesday helped Mt. Sinai Memorial Park revive the Judaic tradition of burying sacred texts--taking their theme from Islam's Prophet Mohammed. "We are the people of the book" was an oft-repeated refrain during a 45-minute service written for the occasion after research turned up no record of a Jewish ritual.
NEWS
April 16, 1995 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months ago, the Vatican released a 179-page letter--an encyclical--from Pope John Paul II to the bishops of the Roman Catholic Church. It was a complex, tightly reasoned condemnation of moral relativism and situational ethics--a call for strict adherence to the principle that some acts are just plain wrong ("intrinsically evil") and cannot be justified by extenuating circumstances, no matter how compelling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1995
Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz of Israel, one of the world's foremost Talmudic scholars, will make a rare appearance in Los Angeles on Monday during a public address on the Passover theme of "The Fourth Child." Steinsaltz, the winner of the Israel Prize--that nation's highest honor--is best known for the work that he and a team of scholars have undertaken to translate into English the Talmud, a sweeping multivolume collection of Jewish law and learning completed in the 6th Century.
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