Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReligious Movie
IN THE NEWS

Religious Movie

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
Whenever Hollywood makes a movie from a well-loved story or saga - Batman, Tolkien, "50 Shades of Grey" - there's usually a period of ... well ... let's call it adjustment , along with a "spirited" give-and-take among fans over such things as casting, content and approach. Usually, though, the material's devotees don't believe the filmmakers will burn in hell if their ideas are ignored. (OK ... maybe the Dark Knight crowd does. We all know they can get a little intense.) But that's precisely the belief with "Noah," Darren Aronofsky's $130-million retelling of the Old Testament account of apocalyptic deluge and a floating ark that opens on March 28. The same people who gripe that Hollywood never makes any faith-based movies are complaining because Hollywood has gone and made a religious movie, albeit one that might not be as literal-minded as they'd like.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
Whenever Hollywood makes a movie from a well-loved story or saga - Batman, Tolkien, "50 Shades of Grey" - there's usually a period of ... well ... let's call it adjustment , along with a "spirited" give-and-take among fans over such things as casting, content and approach. Usually, though, the material's devotees don't believe the filmmakers will burn in hell if their ideas are ignored. (OK ... maybe the Dark Knight crowd does. We all know they can get a little intense.) But that's precisely the belief with "Noah," Darren Aronofsky's $130-million retelling of the Old Testament account of apocalyptic deluge and a floating ark that opens on March 28. The same people who gripe that Hollywood never makes any faith-based movies are complaining because Hollywood has gone and made a religious movie, albeit one that might not be as literal-minded as they'd like.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
In BILL MAHER'S new documentary, "Religulous," the central figure -- Maher himself -- feels the same way about the film's subject matter at the beginning as at the end: In other words, he thinks religion is a big crock of spit. You know irreverence is the order of the day when Maher, reacting to a smooth-talking black preacher's boast that he got a great deal on his $2,000 suits, drolly observes, "I find it interesting that you're a Christian, you used to be a Muslim, but you buy all your clothes like a Jew."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The release of the Christian film "Son of God" this weekend kicks off an unusually large slate of wide-release religious movies for 2014. Soon to come are "Noah" and "Exodus," followed by the Christian-themed "Heaven Is for Real. " Talk about a flood. "Son of God" comes a decade after the controversial hit "The Passion of the Christ," which generated more than $370 million in revenue at the domestic box office. The new film, culled from footage from the successful History channel "Bible" miniseries, is not expected to do as well, though it could open with up to $20 million in ticket sales in its first weekend, according to people who have seen pre-release audience surveys.  REVIEW: 'Son of God' takes on epic proportions effectively The gallery above gives a sampling of significant religious movies and their box office numbers of the past (using data from Rentrak and Box Office Mojo)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The release of the Christian film "Son of God" this weekend kicks off an unusually large slate of wide-release religious movies for 2014. Soon to come are "Noah" and "Exodus," followed by the Christian-themed "Heaven Is for Real. " Talk about a flood. "Son of God" comes a decade after the controversial hit "The Passion of the Christ," which generated more than $370 million in revenue at the domestic box office. The new film, culled from footage from the successful History channel "Bible" miniseries, is not expected to do as well, though it could open with up to $20 million in ticket sales in its first weekend, according to people who have seen pre-release audience surveys.  REVIEW: 'Son of God' takes on epic proportions effectively The gallery above gives a sampling of significant religious movies and their box office numbers of the past (using data from Rentrak and Box Office Mojo)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1999 | ELAINE GALE
Coast Hills Community Church in Aliso Viejo has mailed 15,000 copies of a religious movie video to every home in the Aliso Viejo ZIP code, spending $45,000 in an effort to promote peace and the Christian faith. The mailing was part of a campaign, called the "Light Southern California" project, in which churches in Huntington Beach, Anaheim, Fullerton, Orange and Tustin also participated.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Susan King
"Divergent," the teenage sci-fi drama starring Shailene Woodley, left the box-office competition in the dust Friday, selling an estimated $22.8 million in ticket sales on 3,936 screens for a healthy per screen average of $5,793. While "Divergent" was expected to have an impressive debut, perhaps the biggest surprise so far is the small religious movie "God's Not Dead," which is on track to be the No. 3 movie this weekend. The film, which Lionsgate's Summit Entertainment hopes will be the studio's next successful young adult franchise a la "The Hunger Games" and "Twilight," also took in $4.9 million at Thursday night showings.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1996
I found David Cole's views on religious TV programming or the lack thereof quite interesting, and his assertions about the depredations of the religious right serving as a disincentive for TV producers are probably, but possibly not so unfortunately, correct ("It's Not the Networks That Shy Away From Religion," Calendar, Dec. 18). However, I must comment about his recollections of "St. Elsewhere." The series Mr. Cole watched must not have been the one I watched. I certainly never saw the Bruce Greenwood character before his conversion as a "caring" doctor who "discovered" Christianity in a way that seemed "perfectly normal."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1992 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If movies existed solely on mood, Nicolas Roeg would be a master. At his best, in the 1973 "Don't Look Now," he brought to Daphne du Maurier's pulp Gothic novel an elliptical, languorous cool that seemed specifically modern. Roeg used to be a master cinematographer--he shot "Far From the Madding Crowd" and was chief second-unit cameraman on "Lawrence of Arabia." As a director, though, he's still thinking like a cinematographer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1992 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If movies existed solely on mood, Nicolas Roeg would be a master. At his best, in the 1973 "Don't Look Now," he brought to Daphne du Maurier's pulp Gothic novel an elliptical, languorous cool that seemed specifically modern. Roeg used to be a master cinematographer--he shot "Far From the Madding Crowd" and was chief second-unit cameraman on "Lawrence of Arabia." As a director, though, he's still thinking like a cinematographer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
In BILL MAHER'S new documentary, "Religulous," the central figure -- Maher himself -- feels the same way about the film's subject matter at the beginning as at the end: In other words, he thinks religion is a big crock of spit. You know irreverence is the order of the day when Maher, reacting to a smooth-talking black preacher's boast that he got a great deal on his $2,000 suits, drolly observes, "I find it interesting that you're a Christian, you used to be a Muslim, but you buy all your clothes like a Jew."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2000 | ANN SHIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After journalist Raymond Teague's home burned to the ground in Fort Worth in 1985, he took a year's leave from the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and moved to a small town in Arkansas with his wife and 10-year-old daughter. Without the cultural advantages of big city life, they gathered around the television set to watch movies on their VCR--more than 900 films in all. "We started noting that movies were helping us to explore life," Teague said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
A 19th century German nun who was prone to trance-like states of consciousness has been a divine inspiration for many films involving Jesus dating back to 1895, according to Father Michael Morris, a Dominican friar and the owner of one of the world's largest collections of biblical movie posters. The detailed, visionary accounts of Jesus' passion and death channeled by Anna Catherine Emmerich were transcribed by the poet Clemens Brentano and later artistically rendered by James Tissot for a popular illustrated Bible published more than a century ago at the dawn of cinema.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|