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Religious Music

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NEWS
January 7, 1993 | CONSELLA A. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Religious music comes easily to Dave Weston--and well it should after 50 years. Last month, Weston, 69, celebrated his golden anniversary in gospel music at a dinner reception hosted by friends and family. "We have a saying in our group that we're trying to give him his flowers while he can still smell them," said Clyde Smith, 46, a member of the Dave Weston Singers for 32 years. Recognition of Weston is coming from other quarters as well, including California Gov.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2007 | Francisco Vara-Orta, Times Staff Writer
Before the advent of the 15th century printing press that eventually made books available to the masses, Christian priests, monks and nuns in the Middle Ages relied on rare, handmade and colorfully illustrated choir books to preserve their music generation to generation. Music in the religious world in Europe had been passed down orally until the 800s, when monks began to transcribe their melodies onto the parchment of their choir books.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1987 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Catholic churches should no longer be used for concerts of secular music, the Vatican said in new guidelines published in Rome over the weekend. The instructions, drawn up by the Vatican department responsible for religious services, state that only religious music should be played in church and that no entrance fee should be charged.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Even if I hadn't been stuck in downtown traffic Friday morning, I probably would have been glued to the radio. Political reporters pressed special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald to reveal more about his investigation of a White House leak that outed a covert CIA agent than was included in his short report. He resisted, saying that he did not enjoy keeping secrets but that he was constrained by law.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | MARY ANN SWISSLER
All ye who think of church music as ancient choruses from some dusty hymnal, take note: All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena is singing a different tune. Premiering tonight is "Musica Mundial," a concert of culturally diverse, modern- day religious music for a new world. "We're suggesting that our music is the answer to the question, 'What is the current-day religious music?'
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though neither wrote conventionally sentimental religious music and both composed in vastly different styles, Stravinsky and Faure each wrote masterworks that address human needs at times of religious and personal crisis. They might, however, be surprised to find themselves on the same program, as they were Wednesday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center when Carl St.
OPINION
April 7, 2003
As the president of Operation USA, an international relief organization, I take strong exception to Franklin Graham's cheery description of Samaritan's Purse, his evangelical relief group set up as an adjunct to the Billy Graham Evangelistic Assn. ("No Strings Attached," Commentary, April 3). Graham raised more than a few eyebrows some months ago when he opined that Islam was a "very evil, wicked religion." That he would think he'll get a friendly reception in Iraq is sheer fantasy. More telling is Nicaragua's experience with Samaritan's Purse, which came in 1999 after Hurricane Mitch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1998 | From Religion News Service
In an early scene in Robert Duvall's "The Apostle," a song called "I Will Not Go Quietly" plays briefly on a truck radio. In less than 30 seconds, the sounds of the song sung by Steven Curtis Chapman drift away. Likewise, at the end of the recent film "Hard Rain," a song fittingly called "Flood" by the Christian alternative rock group Jars of Clay plays as Christian Slater says his final lines and the credits start to roll.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
It was Pentecost at the Eastminster Presbyterian Church in Ventura and composer Jeff Kaiser was getting ready to break the liturgical sound barrier. Suddenly, a stream of computer-generated sounds pierced the still church air. The whooshing noises and strange beats danced over the heads of parishioners, evoking the tongues of fire that the Bible says flickered above the apostles on that first Pentecost, filling them with the Holy Ghost and allowing them to speak in tongues.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2003 | James C. Taylor; Richard S. Ginell; Chris Pasles
Beethoven: Piano Concertos Nos. 1-5 Pierre-Laurent Aimard, piano; Chamber Orchestra of Europe; Nikolaus Harnoncourt, conductor (Teldec) ** 1/2 Aimard is a major specialist in contemporary music who has lately taken an interest in Beethoven. His approach here is surprisingly plain-wrap, with little shading or exploratory phrasing and virtually no assertion of personality. It's all a bit crude and graceless, although the slow movement of No.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
He has tried to imagine what heaven will be like, but contemporary Christian singer Bart Millard could not have dreamed up this -- his band joining Christina Aguilera and 50 Cent on the pop charts. "I Can Only Imagine," which he recorded with the band MercyMe, reflects the singer's musings about how he would deal with the afterlife, and may be the most overtly religious song to hit the Top 40 since 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2003 | James C. Taylor; Richard S. Ginell; Chris Pasles
Beethoven: Piano Concertos Nos. 1-5 Pierre-Laurent Aimard, piano; Chamber Orchestra of Europe; Nikolaus Harnoncourt, conductor (Teldec) ** 1/2 Aimard is a major specialist in contemporary music who has lately taken an interest in Beethoven. His approach here is surprisingly plain-wrap, with little shading or exploratory phrasing and virtually no assertion of personality. It's all a bit crude and graceless, although the slow movement of No.
OPINION
April 7, 2003
As the president of Operation USA, an international relief organization, I take strong exception to Franklin Graham's cheery description of Samaritan's Purse, his evangelical relief group set up as an adjunct to the Billy Graham Evangelistic Assn. ("No Strings Attached," Commentary, April 3). Graham raised more than a few eyebrows some months ago when he opined that Islam was a "very evil, wicked religion." That he would think he'll get a friendly reception in Iraq is sheer fantasy. More telling is Nicaragua's experience with Samaritan's Purse, which came in 1999 after Hurricane Mitch.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1999 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The World Festival of Sacred Music--the Americas, the multicultural, multi-venue nine-day event that unfolded in Southern California in October, was a critical favorite, with adjectives such as "sensational," "mesmerizing" and "captivating" surfacing in reviews. Now, it appears that the bare-bones, often volunteer effort was a financial success as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
His smiling visage appears as computer screen savers. His lectures sell out within minutes. His books have just made American publishing history when, for the first time, a religious leader landed two tomes on national bestseller lists at the same time. His Holiness Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet, perennially describes himself as just a "simple Buddhist monk."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1999 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
His Holiness, Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet, is a strong attracter, a spiritual magnet, for music. It seems to accompany him everywhere. His teachings such as the Kalachakra Initiation--a series of instructions handed down from the Buddha to enhance compassionate consciousness, which he is leading on this sticky Indiana Saturday--begin with the sonorous, calming chants of monks.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles covers music and dance for The Times Orange County Edition.
In a typically eclectic program, the Irvine Camerata concert Saturday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre is going to include works by a friend of founding music director Robert Hickok. In addition to Renaissance motets based on the Gregorian chant "Alma Redemptoris Mater," and Mozart's "Vesperae Solennes de Confessore", the program will include music by three U.S. composers--Robert L. Sanders, Ross Lee Finney and William Billings. Hickok calls Sanders, who died in 1974, "an old and dear friend."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Even if I hadn't been stuck in downtown traffic Friday morning, I probably would have been glued to the radio. Political reporters pressed special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald to reveal more about his investigation of a White House leak that outed a covert CIA agent than was included in his short report. He resisted, saying that he did not enjoy keeping secrets but that he was constrained by law.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gospel choirs, Tibetan monks and nuns, traditional Hawaiian dancers and musicians, Bosnian and Croatian choruses, Native American drum circles and the Los Angeles Philharmonic represent only a small sampling of the global mix of artists scheduled to perform in more than 60 Los Angeles venues during the World Festival of Sacred Music--the Americas, Oct. 9-17.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Although the concert schedule this week is light, this is also a week when music, serious and important music, enters deeply into many people's lives. Easter and Passover are upon us, as is the first flush of spring. We contemplate life, death and rebirth, and music--be it in church service or Seder--can be expected to lead the way. But music can do even more, since the best religious art transcends specific doctrine or practice.
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