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Religious Orders

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1989 | From Religious News Service
The Vatican has opened formal channels of communication with conservative nuns in the United States who have resisted many of the reforms spearheaded by other religious orders in recent years. The new development places the conservative orders in a better position to press their cases against what they see as the drift toward liberalism and secularization among American nuns, according to church leaders. The Vatican has appointed Cardinal James Hickey of Washington to serve as liaison to orders that have either broken away from or been refused membership in the official leadership organization of religious sisters in the United States.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2013 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan
Confidential personnel records from five Catholic religious orders were turned over to victims of sexual abuse Wednesday in the first wave of a court-ordered public disclosure expected to shed light on the role the groups, operating independently of the L.A. Archdiocese, played in the region's clergy molestation scandal. The documents pertain to a dozen priests, brothers and nuns accused of sexual misconduct in the landmark 2007 settlement with hundreds of people who filed abuse claims against the Roman Catholic Church in Los Angeles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2013 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan
Confidential personnel records from five Catholic religious orders were turned over to victims of sexual abuse Wednesday in the first wave of a court-ordered public disclosure expected to shed light on the role the groups, operating independently of the L.A. Archdiocese, played in the region's clergy molestation scandal. The documents pertain to a dozen priests, brothers and nuns accused of sexual misconduct in the landmark 2007 settlement with hundreds of people who filed abuse claims against the Roman Catholic Church in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2013 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan
Thousands of pages of secret files held by Roman Catholic orders concerning priests accused of molesting children will be released throughout the summer beginning as early as next month, according to attorneys. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Emilie Elias set a deadline of September for the religious orders to turn over files on dozens of priests for public release at a hearing Tuesday. The release of confidential files kept by the orders, such as the Salesians, Vincentians and Marinists, were agreed to as part of settlements with victims.
WORLD
February 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Transsexuals suffer from "mental pathologies," are ineligible for admission to Roman Catholic religious orders and should be expelled if they have already entered the priesthood or religious life, the Vatican says in new directives. The Vatican's orthodoxy watchdog, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, said transsexuals should be barred as priests, monks, friars, nuns and brothers in religious orders.
NEWS
April 4, 1993
Roy Rivenburg's article on cults ("When Worlds Collide," March 10) was generally good. But we know (that) what is in our papers by columnists and other journalists is shaped by their culture, education and religion, or lack of it. May I take exception to James R. Lewis' remark that religious orders use mind-control techniques. Perhaps some do, but I entered a religious order and have remained in it freely for 50 years. It was my choice then. I re-evaluated it through the years and I still approve of my decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1990
The student body of Cantwell High School in Montebello walked out of class Monday to protest a decision by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles to drop the contract of the Congregation of Christian Brothers, a religious order that has run the boys' school since it opened 43 years ago. About 230 students left their classes and held a two-hour rally in the gymnasium. They asked that Archbishop Roger Mahony visit the school to witness the quality of education they receive from the Christian Brothers.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2010 | By John Biemer, Special to the Chicago Tribune
Catholic nuns are known for their acts of charity, but Sister Adrienne Schmidt has found a way to give beyond the grave: She will donate her brain to science. First, though, she is exercising it in an annual battery of memory tests administered by researchers at Chicago's Rush University. Schmidt, 82, repeats two-digit numbers, then three, four, five, six and seven digits. She names as many animals as she can in a minute. She listens to a 30-second story about a school cafeteria cook who is robbed of $56. Half an hour later, she must repeat as many details as she can. The yearly tests are designed to provide a history of how her brain is aging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2000 | Religion News Service
Roman Catholic religious orders have made significant progress in addressing a growing retirement crisis. According to a report by the National Religious Retirement Office, 61% of religious orders are planning for retirement needs, which is up from 40% in 1994. Additionally, the number of orders that have sold unused property to make money has doubled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1994 | From Religious News Service
Catholic nuns, preparing for a major Vatican meeting this fall on religious orders, have asked to be included in decision-making positions in the church. More than 425 heads of women's religious orders responded to a survey about the October Synod of Bishops in Rome, the theme of which is religious life. A summary of their responses was published in the latest bulletin of the International Union of Superiors General, a federation of the heads of women's religious orders.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2010 | By John Biemer, Special to the Chicago Tribune
Catholic nuns are known for their acts of charity, but Sister Adrienne Schmidt has found a way to give beyond the grave: She will donate her brain to science. First, though, she is exercising it in an annual battery of memory tests administered by researchers at Chicago's Rush University. Schmidt, 82, repeats two-digit numbers, then three, four, five, six and seven digits. She names as many animals as she can in a minute. She listens to a 30-second story about a school cafeteria cook who is robbed of $56. Half an hour later, she must repeat as many details as she can. The yearly tests are designed to provide a history of how her brain is aging.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2010 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey
President Obama late Thursday ordered most hospitals in the country to grant the same visitation rights to gay and lesbian partners that they do to married heterosexual couples. In a memo to his Health and Human Services agency, Obama ordered the secretary to ensure that all hospitals getting Medicare and Medicaid money honor all patients' advance directives, including those designating who gets family visitation privileges. The order also requires that documents granting power of attorney and healthcare proxies be honored, regardless of sexual orientation.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2010 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
President Obama late Thursday ordered most hospitals across the country to grant the same visitation rights to gay and lesbian partners as they do to heterosexual married couples. In a memo to his Health and Human Services agency, Obama ordered the secretary to make sure all hospitals getting Medicare and Medicaid money are honoring all patients' advance directives, including those designating who gets family visitation privileges. The order also requires that documents granting power of attorney and healthcare proxies be honored, regardless of sexual orientation.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2009 | Scott Calvert
As incense smoke danced in the sunlight streaming through the stained-glass windows, Anthonia Nwoga knelt in the hushed chapel for the long-awaited moment. It took but a few seconds. Off came the white veil she had worn for the last year. On went a black one that she may keep for life.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2009 | Associated Press
The Vatican has begun a first-ever comprehensive study of women's religious orders in the United States, four decades into a steep decline in the number of Roman Catholic sisters and nuns in the country.
WORLD
June 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
An ultraconservative Muslim seminary in India issued a fatwa, or edict, against terrorism during a meeting attended by thousands of clerics and students. The Darul Uloom Deoband, a 150-year-old institute controlling thousands of smaller Islamic seminaries in India, pledged Saturday to wipe out terrorism, a senior rector said. "Islam rejects all kinds of unjust violence, breach of peace, bloodshed, murder and plunder and does not allow it in any form," rector Habibur Rehman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1986 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, Times Religion Writer
Nearly three years ago, Pope John Paul II asked the nation's Roman Catholic bishops to find out why unprecedented numbers of U.S. nuns, priests and brothers had left their orders and why religious vocations were attracting so few new members.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Last Sunday morning, during 9:30 Mass at Holy Family Church in Glendale, Sister Mary Realino Lynch came out of retirement to face the parishioners once again, this time from the pulpit. A quiet-mannered, white-haired woman in an off-white knit dress, she spoke with little emotion, letting her words carry the urgency. It was humbling, she told them, to be appealing to people who face concerns about retirement in their own lives.
WORLD
April 16, 2005 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Sexual abuse victims knocked on the door of a religious order near St. Peter's Square on Friday seeking a priest who is wanted in the United States in connection with allegations that he molested minors. But leaders of the U.S.-based Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests were politely told the priest was not home. Barbara Blaine, president of the group, handed the greeter a letter urging the priest's superiors to send him back to the U.S. to face charges.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2003 | Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun
An order of nuns headquartered in Maryland has apologized for its role in Irish laundries depicted in the controversial film "The Magdalene Sisters." The movie, which has been criticized by some Catholic groups, was released nationally last week and tells the story of three women who in the 1960s were forced to work under abusive conditions. In a statement issued from their Silver Spring, Md.
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