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NEWS
March 16, 2001 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite concerns from right to left, the White House is using the levers of executive power to move forward with President Bush's plan to expand the role of faith-based charities in the nation's social safety net.
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NEWS
August 18, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The director of President Bush's program to expand religious groups' role in providing social services said Friday that he will resign, the latest setback to an initiative that has been beleaguered from its start. The resignation of John J. DiIulio Jr. as director of the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, while not entirely unexpected, nonetheless surprised many observers.
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NEWS
June 30, 1988
Wrapping up its 1987-1988 term, the Supreme Court also issued the following rulings: - The Constitution may prohibit executing murderers who were younger than 16 when they committed their crimes. - The separation of church and state does not bar a law, backed by the Reagan Administration, that grants money to charitable and religious groups for programs to promote chastity among teen-agers.
NEWS
August 17, 2001 | ANUJ GUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chris Groccia ran a Head Start program from the Sunday school room of a Worcester, Mass., church, she helped each week to cover up the religious images, icons and verses displayed on the classroom walls. Officials of the child development program believed the law required them to obscure the religious materials "because [Head Start] is a federally funded program," said Groccia, who now heads Missouri's state Head Start collaboration office.
NEWS
April 9, 2001 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor John F. Street spent New Year's Day in jail. With 120 ministers in tow, he visited all four of the city's lockups, informing inmates that the time is coming when Philadelphia's congregations will reach out to help them as soon as they are freed. Beginning this week, Street's voice--on tape--will contact parents whose children are absent from school without an excuse.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush delivered a spirited defense Tuesday of his proposal to give government contracts to religious-based organizations that provide social services. Calling himself "four-hammer George" for his occasional prowess at pounding home a nail with only four strokes, Bush was part of a team that helped build a house here under the Habitat for Humanity program, which is dedicated to housing low-income people.
NEWS
August 17, 2001 | ANUJ GUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chris Groccia ran a Head Start program from the Sunday school room of a Worcester, Mass., church, she helped each week to cover up the religious images, icons and verses displayed on the classroom walls. Officials of the child development program believed the law required them to obscure the religious materials "because [Head Start] is a federally funded program," said Groccia, who now heads Missouri's state Head Start collaboration office.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Key senators on Tuesday put the brakes on President Bush's effort to channel more government money to religious charities, giving the White House time to fine-tune its proposal before the Senate acts on the more controversial parts of the package. The decision to wait several months to a year to act on the "charitable choice" component of the package, which would allow government to fund religious-oriented social services, was made with the White House's agreement.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Tying his plan for religious charities to the best hopes of the founding fathers, President Bush urged Congress on Wednesday to allow government funds to flow to churches, mosques and synagogues that seek to ease social woes. As the nation celebrated America's 225th birthday Wednesday with parades, fireworks and barbecues, Bush said in a speech in front of Independence Hall that "these soldiers in the armies of compassion deserve our support. They often need our support.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, keeping to his domestic schedule amid the first foreign policy test of his administration, gave a spirited defense Tuesday of his faith-based community service initiative. By day's end in Washington, Bush was monitoring the situation in China, where the Beijing government was holding 24 Americans captured after a U.S. surveillance plane made an emergency landing in China on Sunday. But midday found him in the H.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Tying his plan for religious charities to the best hopes of the founding fathers, President Bush urged Congress on Wednesday to allow government funds to flow to churches, mosques and synagogues that seek to ease social woes. As the nation celebrated America's 225th birthday Wednesday with parades, fireworks and barbecues, Bush said in a speech in front of Independence Hall that "these soldiers in the armies of compassion deserve our support. They often need our support.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush delivered a spirited defense Tuesday of his proposal to give government contracts to religious-based organizations that provide social services. Calling himself "four-hammer George" for his occasional prowess at pounding home a nail with only four strokes, Bush was part of a team that helped build a house here under the Habitat for Humanity program, which is dedicated to housing low-income people.
NEWS
May 21, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Sunday declared America's war on poverty "only half-done" and delivered an impassioned pitch for his plan to increase government funding for religious organizations that perform social services. Bush characterized his faith-based initiative as the next step in the evolution of Washington's long campaign to combat poverty, launched by Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 and overhauled by welfare reform legislation in 1996.
NEWS
April 9, 2001 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor John F. Street spent New Year's Day in jail. With 120 ministers in tow, he visited all four of the city's lockups, informing inmates that the time is coming when Philadelphia's congregations will reach out to help them as soon as they are freed. Beginning this week, Street's voice--on tape--will contact parents whose children are absent from school without an excuse.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, keeping to his domestic schedule amid the first foreign policy test of his administration, gave a spirited defense Tuesday of his faith-based community service initiative. By day's end in Washington, Bush was monitoring the situation in China, where the Beijing government was holding 24 Americans captured after a U.S. surveillance plane made an emergency landing in China on Sunday. But midday found him in the H.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite concerns from right to left, the White House is using the levers of executive power to move forward with President Bush's plan to expand the role of faith-based charities in the nation's social safety net.
NEWS
January 30, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush on Monday created an office in the White House that would enable religious organizations to receive government funds to provide services to the poor and downtrodden. Bush--calling the proposal among the "most important initiatives" of his new administration--plans to send to Capitol Hill today a legislative proposal that would increase funding for such services.
NEWS
May 21, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Sunday declared America's war on poverty "only half-done" and delivered an impassioned pitch for his plan to increase government funding for religious organizations that perform social services. Bush characterized his faith-based initiative as the next step in the evolution of Washington's long campaign to combat poverty, launched by Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 and overhauled by welfare reform legislation in 1996.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Key senators on Tuesday put the brakes on President Bush's effort to channel more government money to religious charities, giving the White House time to fine-tune its proposal before the Senate acts on the more controversial parts of the package. The decision to wait several months to a year to act on the "charitable choice" component of the package, which would allow government to fund religious-oriented social services, was made with the White House's agreement.
NEWS
January 30, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush on Monday created an office in the White House that would enable religious organizations to receive government funds to provide services to the poor and downtrodden. Bush--calling the proposal among the "most important initiatives" of his new administration--plans to send to Capitol Hill today a legislative proposal that would increase funding for such services.
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