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Religious Persecution

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1996
James Pinkerton hits a nerve when he discusses religious freedom and persecution of religious minorities ("From Ethiopia to China, the Lions Are Out There," Commentary, Nov. 3). As a result of his focus on persecution of Christians, however, Pinkerton does not go far enough. The targets of discrimination in many Muslim countries, for example, are most often Muslims themselves who are active in Islamic politics. As far as the Muslim countries are concerned, Muslims who disagree with the ruling party hold their opposition meetings in prison and torture cells.
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NEWS
February 4, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
Speaking at a mega-church on the edge of Las Vegas, Newt Gingrich decried what he says is a decades-long war against religion in the United States and argued that other faiths are given tolerance while Christianity is persecuted, and said he is running because the nation's very future is at stake. "If I am president these children are not going to grow up in  a secular country dominated by an elite who despise our history, dislike our culture and dislike our religion," Gingrich said, after calling all the  children in the church to join him on stage.
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NEWS
February 4, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
Speaking at a mega-church on the edge of Las Vegas, Newt Gingrich decried what he says is a decades-long war against religion in the United States and argued that other faiths are given tolerance while Christianity is persecuted, and said he is running because the nation's very future is at stake. "If I am president these children are not going to grow up in  a secular country dominated by an elite who despise our history, dislike our culture and dislike our religion," Gingrich said, after calling all the  children in the church to join him on stage.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2011 | By Richard Marosi and Andrew Becker
Thousands of immigrants from India have crossed into the United States illegally at the southern tip of Texas in the last year, part of a mysterious and rapidly growing human-smuggling pipeline that is backing up court dockets, filling detention centers and triggering investigations. The immigrants, mostly young men from poor villages, say they are fleeing religious and political persecution. More than 1,600 Indians have been caught since the influx began here early last year, while an undetermined number, perhaps thousands, are believed to have sneaked through undetected, according to U.S. border authorities.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
After months of negotiations, the Senate unanimously passed legislation Friday requiring the president to take action against countries that engage in a pattern of religious persecution. Senators passed the Freedom From Religious Persecution Act, 98-0, after the White House agreed to language that was considerably weaker than in previous versions. The House already has approved similar legislation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The author of a recent book on the plight of persecuted Christians worldwide called on a Newport Beach congregation Sunday to pray for fellow believers and join the blossoming movement to decry human rights abuses of Christians around the globe.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over strong opposition from the Clinton administration and big business, the House overwhelmingly approved legislation Thursday requiring Washington to impose economic sanctions against countries, including allies, that practice religious persecution. The bill is an unprecedented move by Congress to project one of America's founding ideals, religious freedom, into foreign policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1997 | JAMES BEAM, James Beam is a former mayor of Orange
Bipartisan legislation titled "The Freedom from Religious Persecution Act" was introduced in Congress on May 20 by Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R-Va.), Rep. Tony P. Hall (D-Ohio) and Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) that deals with the issue of Christian persecution throughout the world.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese government intensified religious persecution after Congress awarded it permanent normal trade status last year, apparently because Beijing concluded that the United States is not serious about advocating tolerance, a high-level U.S. commission said Monday. "There has been a significant deterioration in religious freedom since [normal trade status] was voted," said Elliott Abrams, chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.
NEWS
February 22, 2002 | EDWIN CHEN and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush today called for an end to religious persecution in China, less than 24 hours after Chinese President Jiang Zemin asserted that "religious faiths are protected by our constitution." In a nationally televised address here, Bush also called for free elections "all the way to the national level."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2009 | Associated Press
A rare trove of 11,000 Hebrew books and manuscripts went on display at Sotheby's in New York this week as the auction house looks for a buyer for what is considered the greatest collection of Judaica in private hands. The Valmadonna Trust Library includes documents of unparalleled significance, including a copy of a 16th century Hebrew Bible once owned by Westminster Abbey. Some have burn or water marks or other signs of religious persecution. The complete library, valued at more than $40 million, is being shown in its entirety for the first time at Sotheby's until Feb. 19. The trust has asked the auction house to facilitate the sale of the complete collection to a public institution or private collector.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2008 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Child welfare investigators who entered a polygamist compound in West Texas this weekend found many pregnant teenagers and underage girls who said they were forced to marry, according to court documents unsealed Tuesday. The documents detailed the evidence that Texas officials presented to a judge to justify taking temporary state custody of more than 400 children from the YFZ Ranch, near the tiny town of Eldorado, built by the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
OPINION
January 8, 2007
Re "Let no judge put asunder," editorial, Jan. 3 When it comes to marriage, it's amazing that more than 200 years after our nation's founding fathers created what they hoped would be a more perfect union no longer beset by the intrusion of religion in our daily life, religion persists in raising its sometimes ugly head. As for allowing voters to decide who can and who can't marry -- which the people of Massachusetts may do in 2008 -- if voters and not courts had been allowed to set national policy on civil rights, we probably would still be seeing signs on drinking fountains and restaurants and buses and toilets reading, "whites" and "coloreds."
OPINION
October 23, 2004
Re "A Presbyterian Leader, in Syria, Criticizes Israeli Occupation," Oct. 19: The Rev. Nile Harper's [head of the U.S. Presbyterian Church delegation] castigation of Israel and support for Hezbollah is simply despicable. Apparently, he does not believe that a people who have suffered indignation, slavery and genocide by Arabs and Christians alike for millenniums have the right to a homeland of their own. He must have forgotten that his own ancestors fled to the U.S. to get away from the religious persecution in England.
NEWS
June 8, 2002 | ZACHARY KARABELL
Cathars. Albigensians. Heresy. The Inquisition. These words tap into some murky collective memory of a forgotten time of great violence. Until a few years ago, the story of the Cathars had been all but forgotten, save for a few academics who excavated and preserved their legacy and for the inhabitants of the Languedoc region of France, where the echo has lingered for centuries.
NEWS
February 22, 2002 | EDWIN CHEN and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush today called for an end to religious persecution in China, less than 24 hours after Chinese President Jiang Zemin asserted that "religious faiths are protected by our constitution." In a nationally televised address here, Bush also called for free elections "all the way to the national level."
NEWS
September 22, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate leaders are promising action before Congress ends this fall on long-stalled legislation intended to combat religious persecution abroad. But this seemingly unassailable objective is giving new meaning to the congressional adage, "The devil is in the details." Almost all sides in the emotional debate agree that thousands of people around the globe face starvation, murder, rape, kidnapping, imprisonment, forced conversion, slavery and other atrocities because of their religious beliefs.
NEWS
October 27, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration designated the Taliban rulers of Afghanistan and six other governments the world's worst persecutors of religious believers Friday, but rejected calls to include other countries that the White House views as key in the war on terrorism. Human rights groups complained that Saudi Arabia, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan should have been added to the annual list released by the State Department.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese government intensified religious persecution after Congress awarded it permanent normal trade status last year, apparently because Beijing concluded that the United States is not serious about advocating tolerance, a high-level U.S. commission said Monday. "There has been a significant deterioration in religious freedom since [normal trade status] was voted," said Elliott Abrams, chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.
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