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Religious Preference

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NEWS
March 27, 1987
About three Americans in 10 can be described as "unchurched," but only 4% of those can be described as "totally non-religious," according to a survey conducted by the Gallup Poll. The "unchurched" Americans were classified as those who said they were not members of any church or synagogue, but who did express a religious preference or said that religion was at least "fairly important" in their lives.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 13, 2006
Re "Christians Sue for Right Not to Tolerate Policies," April 10 There is no scientific evidence that one is born a Christian or any other religious denomination. Religious preference is a chosen lifestyle. So, when evangelical Christians rail against homosexuals for their chosen lifestyle, they are also making the case for religious intolerance. One chooses his or her religion, so whether or not sexual orientation is a choice is irrelevant. What is relevant is whether or not the choice harms society, and at this point the greatest evidence of harm to society comes from the choice to be an evangelical Christian.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1991
It seems to me that the controversy over evolution or creation, while important to many persons, is not the basic issue. Rather, our concern should be whether any person, while serving as a public official paid by taxpayers, may, in the course of his duties, advocate the beliefs or tenets of a given religious preference. Mr. Peloza's statements, as reported by your article of May 16, indicate that he has made an effort to present both the theory of creation and the theory of spontaneous natural evolution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2002 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The alienation of moderates and liberals from conservative Christian political positions is a key reason why the percentage of Americans who claim no religion doubled during the 1990s, two UC Berkeley sociologists say. Michael Hout and Claude Fischer analyzed data from annual public opinion surveys on religion taken by numerous organizations to reach their conclusion, published as an article in the American Sociological Review.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1988
Berman and D'Agostino Campaigns' record of support for candidates and causes devoted to equal opportunity for everyone, protection of the environment, and the highest level of integrity in government speaks for itself. We have devoted ourselves to working for whom we consider to be the best candidate--without consideration to race, sex, or religious preference. We deplore racism and anti-Semitism in any form! We profoundly regret any embarrassment or offense taken by anyone who has misinterpreted the intent, meaning and context of the excerpts of a stolen, private communication that unfortunately appeared in The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2002 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The alienation of moderates and liberals from conservative Christian political positions is a key reason why the percentage of Americans who claim no religion doubled during the 1990s, two UC Berkeley sociologists say. Michael Hout and Claude Fischer analyzed data from annual public opinion surveys on religion taken by numerous organizations to reach their conclusion, published as an article in the American Sociological Review.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1996
Michael Gallagher gets it wrong with his commentary, "The Chaplain as Instrument of War" (Oct. 27). The 1st Amendment to the Constitution assures that the government will not choose one religion over another and establish or support it financially as the religion of the land (the establishment clause). The 1st Amendment also prohibits the government from interfering in citizens' free exercise of religion (the free exercise clause). The Supreme Court has already decided the issue raised by Gallagher by stating that military chaplains do not violate the establishment clause.
OPINION
April 13, 2006
Re "Christians Sue for Right Not to Tolerate Policies," April 10 There is no scientific evidence that one is born a Christian or any other religious denomination. Religious preference is a chosen lifestyle. So, when evangelical Christians rail against homosexuals for their chosen lifestyle, they are also making the case for religious intolerance. One chooses his or her religion, so whether or not sexual orientation is a choice is irrelevant. What is relevant is whether or not the choice harms society, and at this point the greatest evidence of harm to society comes from the choice to be an evangelical Christian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A motorist has won her case in traffic court against a Manhattan Beach police officer whose signature on a ticket included what appeared to be a fish symbol common among Christians. But the motorist, Kathleen Parsons, won on a technicality unrelated to the dispute about the symbol. Dismissing the ticket on technical grounds made the legal and religious questions posed by the signature moot, a judge ruled.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1998
We must object vehemently to the so-called "legal" advice regarding "Workplace Guideposts" [Careers special section, April 6]. How can any of these possibly be considered acceptable: "3. Asking a co-worker if he has found Jesus Christ; 4. Telling an atheist colleague that he is going straight to hell; 7. Telling a fellow employee that she should consider converting to your religion"? We consider these to be very offensive and no one has the right to talk to either of us in such a manner (at work or anywhere!
BUSINESS
April 19, 1998
We must object vehemently to the so-called "legal" advice regarding "Workplace Guideposts" [Careers special section, April 6]. How can any of these possibly be considered acceptable: "3. Asking a co-worker if he has found Jesus Christ; 4. Telling an atheist colleague that he is going straight to hell; 7. Telling a fellow employee that she should consider converting to your religion"? We consider these to be very offensive and no one has the right to talk to either of us in such a manner (at work or anywhere!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1996
Michael Gallagher gets it wrong with his commentary, "The Chaplain as Instrument of War" (Oct. 27). The 1st Amendment to the Constitution assures that the government will not choose one religion over another and establish or support it financially as the religion of the land (the establishment clause). The 1st Amendment also prohibits the government from interfering in citizens' free exercise of religion (the free exercise clause). The Supreme Court has already decided the issue raised by Gallagher by stating that military chaplains do not violate the establishment clause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A motorist has won her case in traffic court against a Manhattan Beach police officer whose signature on a ticket included what appeared to be a fish symbol common among Christians. But the motorist, Kathleen Parsons, won on a technicality unrelated to the dispute about the symbol. Dismissing the ticket on technical grounds made the legal and religious questions posed by the signature moot, a judge ruled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1991
It seems to me that the controversy over evolution or creation, while important to many persons, is not the basic issue. Rather, our concern should be whether any person, while serving as a public official paid by taxpayers, may, in the course of his duties, advocate the beliefs or tenets of a given religious preference. Mr. Peloza's statements, as reported by your article of May 16, indicate that he has made an effort to present both the theory of creation and the theory of spontaneous natural evolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1991 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A broad new survey, described as the most extensive ever made of religious identification in the United States, finds that society overwhelmingly retains its Judeo-Christian character. The survey found that 86.5% of Americans identified with Christian denominations and 2% with Judaism. Only fractional percentages identified with any other faith and 7.5% with no religion. Only half a percent of Americans were counted Muslims, about 1.4 million, 40% of them blacks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1988
Berman and D'Agostino Campaigns' record of support for candidates and causes devoted to equal opportunity for everyone, protection of the environment, and the highest level of integrity in government speaks for itself. We have devoted ourselves to working for whom we consider to be the best candidate--without consideration to race, sex, or religious preference. We deplore racism and anti-Semitism in any form! We profoundly regret any embarrassment or offense taken by anyone who has misinterpreted the intent, meaning and context of the excerpts of a stolen, private communication that unfortunately appeared in The Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1991 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A broad new survey, described as the most extensive ever made of religious identification in the United States, finds that society overwhelmingly retains its Judeo-Christian character. The survey found that 86.5% of Americans identified with Christian denominations and 2% with Judaism. Only fractional percentages identified with any other faith and 7.5% with no religion. Only half a percent of Americans were counted Muslims, about 1.4 million, 40% of them blacks.
NEWS
March 27, 1987
About three Americans in 10 can be described as "unchurched," but only 4% of those can be described as "totally non-religious," according to a survey conducted by the Gallup Poll. The "unchurched" Americans were classified as those who said they were not members of any church or synagogue, but who did express a religious preference or said that religion was at least "fairly important" in their lives.
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