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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2005 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
As a college student in Mexico, Marta Khadija Ramirez was so influenced by Marxist and existentialist writers that she stopped believing in God. That changed during a semester at a British school, where she was a visiting student and three Muslim classmates introduced her to Islam. She decided to convert. But imagine the difficulty of a Latina steeped in Roman Catholic tradition trying to explain Islam to her family in 1983. And imagine that one of her sisters is a Catholic nun.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2012 | Larry Gordon
The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is again extending its reach onto University of California campuses, raising questions about the limits of free speech and how welcome Jewish and Muslim students feel at their schools. But this time, the controversy does not spring from the kind of direct confrontation that occurred two years ago when Muslim protesters tried to shout down the Israeli ambassador during a speech at UC Irvine and then faced criminal prosecution. Instead, the current debate is being stirred by studies UC commissioned about how to cool tempers and whether anti-Semitism and anti-Muslim bias are serious problems on the system's 10 campuses.
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July 25, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
He is arguably the nation's most influential African American televangelist, but for many years, says Pastor Frederick K.C. Price of Crenshaw Christian Center, a lot of blacks "thought I was white." Price, whose Vermont Avenue church is the nation's biggest religious sanctuary, with more than 10,000 seats, eschews the traditional black church's "emotionalism." He prefers opera to gospel music.
WORLD
July 8, 2012 | Patrick J. McDonnell
Resplendent in black cassock and matching skullcap, the bearded Jesuit appears in a YouTube video breaking bread with opposition activists and donating blood at a makeshift rebel clinic, highlighting his solidarity with the Syrian rebellion. But Father Paolo Dall'Oglio, a brawny bear of a man who enunciates each word with a theatrical sense of certitude, scoffs at the "jihad priest" label. He says he remains committed to a peaceful resolution of the conflict in his adopted homeland -- a "jihad of the spirit, not a jihad of arms," as he declared during a recent stay in the rebel-occupied Syrian town of Qusair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2006 | Robert Salladay, Times Staff Writer
Muslim leaders on Tuesday called Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger disrespectful and insulting for ignoring their request to meet about the war in Lebanon so he could explain his appearance at a rally supporting Israel that was attended by thousands. Schwarzenegger and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke at the July 23 event in front of the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles building on Wilshire Boulevard. On Aug.
NEWS
November 16, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a nondescript neighborhood of two-story houses outside Sarajevo, Sead Kalabic runs one of this country's growing number of madrasas--religious schools for young Muslims. Kalabic is a native of central Bosnia, where his family farmed for generations. His tone is soft and most of his words are gentle. But scattered here and there, like signposts in fog, are signals that his world view is very different from that of most Westerners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2008 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Olivarez-Giles is a Times staff writer.
Before the year is up, nearly 45 million people will get more than a sermon at their churches -- they'll get a brochure titled "Why We Should Be Concerned About Christian Zionism." The brochure says Christian Zionism "fosters fear and hatred of Muslims and non-Western Christians" and "can lead to the dehumanization of Israelis and Palestinians." Its distribution reflects the concerns of Christians who are trying to combat what they call the growing influence of Christian Zionism in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
The Three Wise Men who came to worship the Christ child hailed from India and named him Isa, or "Lord," in Sanskrit -- a name that became Jesus in the Bible. The star they followed to find the infant Jesus was not a physical celestial body. It was the omniscient "wisdom star of infinite perception" in the spiritual eye, located between the eyebrows, which the wise men accessed through deep meditation.
WORLD
March 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
President Bush met on St. Patrick's Day with five sisters who want the outlawed Irish Republican Army held responsible for their brother's death. Robert McCartney, 33, a Catholic forklift operator, was beaten and stabbed to death outside a Belfast pub Jan. 30 when he tried to defend a friend from what witnesses described as a knife-wielding IRA gang.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2008 | Joanna Lin
Whether the issue is a Nativity scene in a town square or the Ten Commandments at a city hall, Americans never seem to tire of debating whether public displays of religion are constitutional. Year after year, courts give their blessings to some displays and the ax to others. After more than 200 years debating the 1st Amendment, why haven't we found consensus?
WORLD
February 8, 2011 | Mark Magnier
He's a "living Buddha" with movie-star good looks and an iPod, a 25-year-old who rubs shoulders with Richard Gere and Tom Cruise and is mentioned as a successor to the Dalai Lama. Now allegations that he's a Chinese spy, and a money launderer to boot, have laid bare divisions in the outwardly serene world of Tibetan Buddhism and longtime tensions between China and India. There's a lot at stake. The Karmapa is among Tibetan Buddhism's most revered figures and heads the religion's wealthiest sect, with property estimated at $1.2 billion worldwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2010 | Raja Abdulrahim
At a fundraiser in February for Zaytuna College, organizers seemed intent on preempting critical questions. "Why a Muslim College in America?" the Anaheim event was headlined, as if anticipating the query from audience members. And throughout the four-hour gathering, the speakers repeatedly stated why they believed such an institution was needed, calling it an idea whose time has come. Hatem Bazian, a UC Berkeley lecturer in Near East studies and a co-founder of Zaytuna, said that touch of defensiveness came after more than a year of crisscrossing the country and gauging sentiment from the American Muslim community.
WORLD
March 8, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
The attacks came in the night, as the villagers slept. Hundreds of Muslim herdsmen armed with guns and machetes swooped down on three Christian villages outside Jos in central Nigeria, killing more than 120 people early Sunday, according to witnesses. There were contradictory reports on the casualties. Some said more than 120 were killed, while others put the number at about 200. The massacre in volatile Plateau state -- long beset with ethnic-religious violence -- was apparently a revenge attack.
WORLD
December 25, 2009 | By Caesar Ahmed and Omar Hayali
The Judo family stayed away from Christmas Eve Mass in Baghdad. Because of recent sectarian violence in the capital and other areas of the country, they were worried that churches might be targeted by armed groups. By nightfall, their worst fears had been realized. Not only had a Christian been killed in the northern city of Mosul, but the Shiite Muslim holiday of Ashura, which this year begins one day after Christmas, had made the situation even more volatile: 27 people killed in attacks on Shiite neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | By Duke Helfand
An Anglican congregation evicted from its La Crescenta church in October after it lost a legal battle with the Episcopal Church asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday to hear its case. Congregants at St. Luke's of the Mountains Anglican Church voted in 2006 to leave the Episcopal denomination over theological differences, including the consecration of a gay bishop in New Hampshire. The Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles and the national church sued to retain the church's property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2009 | By Duke Helfand
As the calendar goes, December tends to be a winning month for God. Christians celebrate the birth of Christ. Jews mark the story of Hanukkah. Muslims this year will observe the start of Al-Hijra, the Islamic New Year. And the American Humanist Assn. has decided to join the festivities with an alternative celebration in mind. The group, consisting of atheists and others who say they embrace reason over religion, has launched a national godless holiday campaign, with ads appearing inside or on 250 buses in five U.S. cities, including Los Angeles and San Francisco starting today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1987
Last week Jewish leaders, nationally and locally, agreed to meet with Pope John Paul II in Miami and here in Los Angeles. While the decision was carried by clear majorities, it was also marked by a distinct air of sadness and, in some quarters, cynicism. "How can we justify meeting with the man who honored (Austria President) Kurt Waldheim at the Vatican on June 25, and who failed to speak one word at the meeting about the Nazi extermination of 6 million Jews and thousands of innocent others?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In biting remarks certain to escalate tensions between the Roman Catholic Church and Jewish leaders, the head of Los Angeles' Simon Wiesenthal Center denounced moves by Catholic leaders toward making Pope Pius XII a saint. Pius XII, whose papacy overlapped World War II, "sat on the throne of St. Peter in stony silence, without ever lifting a finger, as each day thousands of Jews from all over Europe were sent to the gas chambers, with his full knowledge," Rabbi Marvin J.
WORLD
November 30, 2009 | By Devorah Lauter
In a sign of latent fears of Islamic influence in Switzerland, voters on Sunday approved a constitutional ban on the construction of minarets on Muslim places of worship. There are only four minarets atop mosques in the small Alpine country, but the two right-wing parties that sponsored the referendum cast it as a political question about the assimilation of Muslims into Swiss life. The minaret "is a political symbol against integration; a symbol more of segregation, and first of all, a symbol to try to introduce Sharia law parallel to Swiss rights," Ulrich Schluer said in a telephone interview.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2009 | By Corina Knoll
The challah was blessed, the Manischewitz wine was poured, the candles were lighted. It could have been any Shabbat dinner in Los Angeles, were it not for the fact that it took place midweek and the room was full of Catholic schoolteachers. The 34 teachers were participants in Bearing Witness, a seminar designed for educators in Catholic schools learning to teach about anti-Semitism and the history of the relationship between Jews and Catholics. Created in 1996 by the Anti-Defamation League, the seminars are now conducted across the United States.
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