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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2005 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
As a college student in Mexico, Marta Khadija Ramirez was so influenced by Marxist and existentialist writers that she stopped believing in God. That changed during a semester at a British school, where she was a visiting student and three Muslim classmates introduced her to Islam. She decided to convert. But imagine the difficulty of a Latina steeped in Roman Catholic tradition trying to explain Islam to her family in 1983. And imagine that one of her sisters is a Catholic nun.
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WORLD
February 8, 2011 | Mark Magnier
He's a "living Buddha" with movie-star good looks and an iPod, a 25-year-old who rubs shoulders with Richard Gere and Tom Cruise and is mentioned as a successor to the Dalai Lama. Now allegations that he's a Chinese spy, and a money launderer to boot, have laid bare divisions in the outwardly serene world of Tibetan Buddhism and longtime tensions between China and India. There's a lot at stake. The Karmapa is among Tibetan Buddhism's most revered figures and heads the religion's wealthiest sect, with property estimated at $1.2 billion worldwide.
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NEWS
July 25, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
He is arguably the nation's most influential African American televangelist, but for many years, says Pastor Frederick K.C. Price of Crenshaw Christian Center, a lot of blacks "thought I was white." Price, whose Vermont Avenue church is the nation's biggest religious sanctuary, with more than 10,000 seats, eschews the traditional black church's "emotionalism." He prefers opera to gospel music.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2009 | Associated Press
The split over gay clerics within the country's largest Lutheran denomination has prompted a conservative faction to begin forming a new Lutheran church body separate from the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Leaders of Lutheran CORE, or Coalition for Renewal, said Wednesday that a working group would immediately begin drafting a constitution and taking other steps to form the denomination, with hopes to have it off the ground by August. "There are many people within the ELCA who are very unhappy with what has happened," said the Rev. Paull Spring, chairman of Lutheran CORE and a retired ELCA bishop from State College, Pa. At its annual convention in Minneapolis in August, ELCA delegates voted to lift a ban that had prohibited sexually active gay and lesbian pastors from serving as clerics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2006 | Robert Salladay, Times Staff Writer
Muslim leaders on Tuesday called Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger disrespectful and insulting for ignoring their request to meet about the war in Lebanon so he could explain his appearance at a rally supporting Israel that was attended by thousands. Schwarzenegger and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke at the July 23 event in front of the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles building on Wilshire Boulevard. On Aug.
NEWS
November 16, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a nondescript neighborhood of two-story houses outside Sarajevo, Sead Kalabic runs one of this country's growing number of madrasas--religious schools for young Muslims. Kalabic is a native of central Bosnia, where his family farmed for generations. His tone is soft and most of his words are gentle. But scattered here and there, like signposts in fog, are signals that his world view is very different from that of most Westerners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2008 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Olivarez-Giles is a Times staff writer.
Before the year is up, nearly 45 million people will get more than a sermon at their churches -- they'll get a brochure titled "Why We Should Be Concerned About Christian Zionism." The brochure says Christian Zionism "fosters fear and hatred of Muslims and non-Western Christians" and "can lead to the dehumanization of Israelis and Palestinians." Its distribution reflects the concerns of Christians who are trying to combat what they call the growing influence of Christian Zionism in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
The Three Wise Men who came to worship the Christ child hailed from India and named him Isa, or "Lord," in Sanskrit -- a name that became Jesus in the Bible. The star they followed to find the infant Jesus was not a physical celestial body. It was the omniscient "wisdom star of infinite perception" in the spiritual eye, located between the eyebrows, which the wise men accessed through deep meditation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1987
Last week Jewish leaders, nationally and locally, agreed to meet with Pope John Paul II in Miami and here in Los Angeles. While the decision was carried by clear majorities, it was also marked by a distinct air of sadness and, in some quarters, cynicism. "How can we justify meeting with the man who honored (Austria President) Kurt Waldheim at the Vatican on June 25, and who failed to speak one word at the meeting about the Nazi extermination of 6 million Jews and thousands of innocent others?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In biting remarks certain to escalate tensions between the Roman Catholic Church and Jewish leaders, the head of Los Angeles' Simon Wiesenthal Center denounced moves by Catholic leaders toward making Pope Pius XII a saint. Pius XII, whose papacy overlapped World War II, "sat on the throne of St. Peter in stony silence, without ever lifting a finger, as each day thousands of Jews from all over Europe were sent to the gas chambers, with his full knowledge," Rabbi Marvin J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2009 | Duke Helfand
The Episcopal Church, casting aside warnings about further alienating conservatives within its ranks, on Tuesday lifted a de facto ban on the ordination of gay bishops and is continuing to weigh a measure that would sanction blessings for same-sex couples. Bishops, clergy and lay leaders voted overwhelmingly at the denomination's General Convention in Anaheim to open "any ordained ministry" to gays and lesbians.
WORLD
March 18, 2009 | FROM TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Authorities ordered criminal charges filed against the great-grandson of India's first prime minister after footage emerged of him comparing a rival Muslim politician to Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden and threatening to cut the throats of Muslims during a political rally. Varun Gandhi, 29, a descendant of former Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, a founding father of India's secular democracy, denied making the comments. Gandhi said the footage had been tampered with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2008 | Steve Padilla
When religion made news in California this year -- and it did frequently -- much of that news involved conflict. Religious leaders of various faiths squared off on Proposition 8, the successful statewide initiative to ban gay marriage. Rifts also continued in the Episcopal Church, largely prompted by differing views on the role of gays and lesbians in church life. But 2008 was also a time for new beginnings and of faiths coming together. As the year comes to a close, let's review a few of them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2008 | Duke Helfand, Helfand is a Times staff writer.
Since its founding more than two centuries ago, the Episcopal Church has often struggled to keep disparate factions unified under its diverse umbrella. Repeated controversies -- over slavery, the ordination of women and even the role of children in church life -- have threatened to tear at its religious fabric.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2008 | Associated Press
A third theologically conservative diocese has broken away from the liberal Episcopal Church in a long-running dispute over the Bible, gay relationships and other issues. The Diocese of Quincy, Ill., took the vote at its annual meeting that ended Saturday. Two other dioceses -- San Joaquin, based in Fresno, and Pittsburgh -- have already split off. Next weekend, the Diocese of Fort Worth will vote on whether to follow suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2008 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Olivarez-Giles is a Times staff writer.
Before the year is up, nearly 45 million people will get more than a sermon at their churches -- they'll get a brochure titled "Why We Should Be Concerned About Christian Zionism." The brochure says Christian Zionism "fosters fear and hatred of Muslims and non-Western Christians" and "can lead to the dehumanization of Israelis and Palestinians." Its distribution reflects the concerns of Christians who are trying to combat what they call the growing influence of Christian Zionism in the U.S.
WORLD
September 20, 2006 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
At churches in Baghdad, parishioners hung signs to say they disagreed with the pope. In Egypt, priests of the Orthodox Coptic Church denounced Pope Benedict XVI's remarks about Islam and said they wished he had considered the reaction before speaking. In Lebanon, where bloody demonstrations erupted early this year over a Danish newspaper's caricatures of the prophet Muhammad, a Christian-Muslim dialogue committee asked imams to keep their Friday sermons calm.
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In a defiant gesture rooted in the battle over homosexuality, two Third World Anglican archbishops on Sunday consecrated four conservative American priests as bishops. The elevation of the four priests on U.S. soil by foreign archbishops sent shock waves through the worldwide Anglican Communion and its U.S. member, the Episcopal Church. It was decried by the Archbishop of Canterbury as trespassing and brought the 2.3-million-member Episcopal denomination closer to formal schism.
WORLD
October 6, 2008 | Maria de Cristofaro and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
In the beginning Pope Benedict XVI read these words: "In the beginning God created the heavens and the Earth." And the pope and millions of viewers watching him on Italian television Sunday night saw that it was good. The pontiff launched a marathon reading of the Bible, from Genesis to Apocalypse, broadcast live on state television. It will last seven days and six nights.
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