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July 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
Last-minute efforts to defuse the violent confrontation over Protestant marches in Northern Ireland crashed into a wall of harsh words and suspicions Friday. The leader of the Orange Order brotherhood in the mostly Protestant town of Portadown, Harold Gracey, said he would not negotiate at all unless his followers were permitted to parade Sunday through the town's main Roman Catholic neighborhood, Garvaghy Road.
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August 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
More than 20,000 Protestants filled the streets of Londonderry on Saturday with British flags and banners declaring "No Surrender"--a defiant demonstration made possible by a deal with leaders of this mostly Roman Catholic city. Amid the clamor, there were hopeful signs that peace can prevail in this British province after years of march-fueled violence.
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NEWS
July 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
Hard-line Protestants formed human roadblocks across Northern Ireland on Monday, bringing the province to a tense standstill and provoking running battles with riot police as darkness fell. Militants hijacked and burned cars in several Belfast neighborhoods as anger over restrictions on traditional Protestant parades flared into violence for a second week.
NEWS
July 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
Hard-line Protestants formed human roadblocks across Northern Ireland on Monday, bringing the province to a tense standstill and provoking running battles with riot police as darkness fell. Militants hijacked and burned cars in several Belfast neighborhoods as anger over restrictions on traditional Protestant parades flared into violence for a second week.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
More than 20,000 Protestants filled the streets of Londonderry on Saturday with British flags and banners declaring "No Surrender"--a defiant demonstration made possible by a deal with leaders of this mostly Roman Catholic city. Amid the clamor, there were hopeful signs that peace can prevail in this British province after years of march-fueled violence.
NEWS
July 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
Last-minute efforts to defuse the violent confrontation over Protestant marches in Northern Ireland crashed into a wall of harsh words and suspicions Friday. The leader of the Orange Order brotherhood in the mostly Protestant town of Portadown, Harold Gracey, said he would not negotiate at all unless his followers were permitted to parade Sunday through the town's main Roman Catholic neighborhood, Garvaghy Road.
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