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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1994
Referring to the Times article, "GOP: Moderate Republicans Warn of Religious Right Takeover" (July 28). It is terrifying to read such statements as "The 1992 GOP platform called for a 'human rights amendment' to the Constitution, outlawing abortion in all circumstances." And "the Texas GOP convention, where delegates carried signs saying, 'A vote for our candidate is a vote for God." It seems that some Republicans hide behind the cloak of religion and moral values for what it can do for them among the voters.
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NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Whether a business can refuse to do business with same-sex couples may be a hot political topic, but it's apparently not ready for prime time at the U.S. Supreme Court. On Monday , the court declined to review a decision by the New Mexico Supreme Court holding that a photographer had to shoot a same-sex “commitment ceremony.” But don't jump to the conclusion that the court refused to take this case because of sympathy for gay rights or an unwillingness to approve religious objections to complying with a particular law. (That is the issue in the Hobby Lobby case involving a company that objects to a federal requirement that it provide certain contraceptives in its employee health plans)
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NEWS
June 2, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
In a major setback for advocates of stronger separation of religion and state in Japan, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday against a Christian woman who sued the government for violating her rights by enshrining her husband in a Shinto ceremony after he died on military duty. The high court overturned two lower-court rulings that the "personal religious rights" of the widow, Yasuko Nakaya, 54, had been violated by Self-Defense Forces officials who helped in the enshrinement over her objections.
OPINION
April 4, 2014
Re "Seeking souls, not votes," Opinion, April 2 Holy doctrinal evolution! The Southern Baptist Convention's Russell Moore urged conservative evangelicals to shelve ardent efforts to thwart gay marriage and even to push hard for immigration reform. The religious right's reassessment of its regressive political agenda may stem from placing too much blind faith in electing conservative evangelicals. After all, in recent times such politicians - while sermonizing on gay marriage, illegal immigration and more - have wound up favoring wealthy patrons' interests much more than those of their faithful electoral base.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In principle, freedom of religion stands as the highest of American values. In practice, however, it is a complicated issue. Congress now is trying to legislate a solution and, like others, finding the issue to be devilishly complex. Consider these cases: * Orthodox Jews wanted to use a private home in Hancock Park as a synagogue, but a homeowners' association objected and the city of Los Angeles refused to give them an exemption from the residential zoning law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The notice from the city of Fountain Valley smacked of religious persecution to Pastor Mariano Yeo. The congregation of about 30 Filipino and Chinese immigrants was ordered to "immediately cease" religious activity in their tiny storefront location or face jail time and thousands of dollars in fines. "It sounds like I'm living in a communist state," Yeo remembered thinking. "This is America."
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite giving lip service to the cause of religious freedom, the Clinton administration has been extremely timid in its enforcement of a 2-year-old law imposing sanctions on governments that practice or condone faith-based persecution, a federal watchdog commission said Friday. The U.S.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Jesus Suarez, a Santeria priest, had slit the throat of one goat that June afternoon. He had three more goats, two sheep and 44 chickens to go. But before he could finish the ritual sacrifice, Coral Gables police swarmed the house where he and some 20 other followers of the Afro-Cuban religion had gathered to worship. The officers, Suarez recalls, pointed their guns at the devotees and screamed at them to freeze. Suarez could hear a couple of worshipers in the front yard yelling, "No dispare!"
NEWS
November 25, 1999 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt favors a policy change that would allow members of the Hopi tribe to capture golden eaglets from a national monument in Northern Arizona, a move that critics fear could open the door to hunting in national parks. The issue at the Wupatki National Monument near Flagstaff, Ariz., has been building since summer, when the Hopi requested permission to take eaglets for use in a religious ceremony.
NEWS
December 10, 1996 | SCOTT HADLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A onetime robber with a long history as a Native American activist won at least a temporary victory Monday in a battle to get drug charges dropped in a case involving the possession of 250 pounds of peyote. Prosecutors decided against filing charges at this time against Paul Skyhorse Durant and a friend, Buzz Berry, after they determined that it looked as if the two were going to use the peyote in legitimate Native American ceremonies, as they had claimed all along. But Deputy Dist. Atty.
OPINION
March 18, 2014 | By Michael A. Helfand
Next week, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate - the requirement that employers provide employee health insurance that covers contraception - impermissibly infringes on the religious liberty of religiously motivated corporations. The legal battles over the mandate have been legion; more than 300 plaintiffs have filed more than 90 cases across the country, all contending that providing health coverage for contraception would require them to violate their faith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
It's not very often that the ACLU gets love from the religious right, but after a Tennessee judge took it upon herself to rename a 7-month-old boy because she found his name offensive to Christians, the civil liberties group, which had strenuously objected, found some new friends. "I got the classic call the other day," said Hedy Weinberg, executive director of the ACLU of Tennessee, who called the judge's action "totally unacceptable. " "They said, 'I really don't like the ACLU, but I support what you are saying and doing about the baby Messiah.
OPINION
May 8, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
"If Mitt Romney can be pushed around, intimidated, coerced, co-opted by a conservative radio talk show host in Middle America, then how is he going to stand up to the Chinese? How is he going to stand up to Putin?" So asked Bryan Fischer, a radio host with the American Family Assn., after claiming credit for Richard Grenell's scalp. Grenell is the openly gay former foreign policy spokesman for the Romney campaign. Before that, he worked for Ambassador John R. Bolton at the United Nations, easily the most revered diplomatic official among the base of the Republican Party since Jeane Kirkpatrick.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2012 | By David Horsey
Richard Grenell had the right resume to be Mitt Romney's spokesman on foreign policy -- a stint as communications director for four of the George W. Bush administration's U.N. ambassadors, a degree from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, his own international PR firm and frequent stints on TV as an expert on international issues. Too bad for him he has a boyfriend. Grenell was the first openly gay spokesman for a presidential candidate, but he never got to speak. Before he even officially started the job, enraged homophobes in the so-called pro-family community spooked Romney's campaign staff.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
Newt Gingrich sees victory in the Alabama and Mississippi primaries on Tuesday as a chance - perhaps his last - to show he remains a viable contender for president. For Rick Santorum, wins in the Deep South hold the potential to drive the former House speaker out of the race, strengthening him for the battle to topple GOP front-runner Mitt Romney. As for Romney, Alabama and Mississippi are an opportunity to diminish, if not crush, the insurgent candidacy of Santorum with an aggressive ad campaign.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Jesus Suarez, a Santeria priest, had slit the throat of one goat that June afternoon. He had three more goats, two sheep and 44 chickens to go. But before he could finish the ritual sacrifice, Coral Gables police swarmed the house where he and some 20 other followers of the Afro-Cuban religion had gathered to worship. The officers, Suarez recalls, pointed their guns at the devotees and screamed at them to freeze. Suarez could hear a couple of worshipers in the front yard yelling, "No dispare!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2008 | Fred Schruers, Special to The Times
There are moments in cultural history, notes Thomas Lindlof in a phrase typical of his fluent but never fussy prose, "of gathered tension." Such a moment came with the 1988 release of Martin Scorsese's "The Last Temptation of Christ," an adaptation of Nikos Kazantzakis' classic novel of the same name. In our present era, when fundamentalists can seek violent solutions, there's a certain harmlessness to the controversy Lindlof so painstakingly details.
WORLD
February 11, 2008 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Perched in the living room of his sprawling villa, security guards posted outside, Ardeshir Cowasjee is feeling a bit cantankerous about the future of volatile Pakistan. Another leader has been killed. He considers his president a pawn of the United States and accuses him of sponsoring the kidnapping and torture of citizens. Massive vote-rigging in the upcoming parliamentary elections appears certain, he says.
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