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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Richard Winton and Angel Jennings
County and state officials have begun moving dozens of physically and mentally disabled residents from two board-and-care homes where they were allegedly forced to live in "deplorable" conditions and punished if they failed to attend religious services. Los Angeles City Atty.  Mike Feuer  filed a lawsuit against Agape Mission House and Agape Home Church, unlicensed assisted-care facilities, alleging that residents lived in overcrowded and substandard conditions. A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge last Friday appointed a receiver to immediately begin relocating residents from the homes in the 2200 block of South Hobart Boulevard.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Richard Winton and Angel Jennings
County and state officials have begun moving dozens of physically and mentally disabled residents from two board-and-care homes where they were allegedly forced to live in "deplorable" conditions and punished if they failed to attend religious services. Los Angeles City Atty.  Mike Feuer  filed a lawsuit against Agape Mission House and Agape Home Church, unlicensed assisted-care facilities, alleging that residents lived in overcrowded and substandard conditions. A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge last Friday appointed a receiver to immediately begin relocating residents from the homes in the 2200 block of South Hobart Boulevard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1991 | Associated Press
Average weekly attendance at U.S. worship services has risen from 100 million to 107 million in the 12 months since a national "Invite a Friend" program was launched by Religion in American Life, the group says. Nicholas B. van Dyck, president of RIAL, said the figure represented projections of findings in Gallup polls showing weekly attendance up to 43% of the population, from 40%.
OPINION
December 28, 2012 | By Corinna Nicolaou
I'm a "None. " That's what pollsters call Americans who respond on national surveys to the question "What is your religious affiliation?" with a single word: "None. " According to the Pew Research Center, the ranks of the Nones have ballooned in recent years, making the fastest-growing religious affiliation no affiliation. Between 1972 and 1989, about 7% of Americans identified as having no formal religious affiliation. However, between 1990 and 2012, that figure jumped to 19.6%.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1992 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The spectacular sand dunes here at Stovepipe Wells provide Richard Beatty with a most unusual pulpit. Beatty, 51, is a student minister for A Christian Ministry in the National Parks, a chaplaincy corps that has operated in national parks for four decades. Since 1952, more than 12,000 student ministers have conducted religious services for millions of visitors to the national parks and thousands of National Park Service employees. Beatty is one of about 300 preachers expected to serve this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a Passover Seder with a difference. There was the usual array of matzo, hard-boiled eggs and horseradish. Several times during the service, the celebrants, mostly children and their parents, rose and sat in accordance with custom. And, as always, they sang song after song about freedom. Yet there was something unusual about this recent gathering at a clubhouse in early observance of the 3,000-year-old holiday commemorating events surrounding the Jewish exodus from Egypt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ and ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Desperately alone in his dark world, 20-year-old Jesus Orbina began to shake and cry uncontrollably when a message delivered to prisoners throughout the world Sunday came to him inside the Los Angeles County Men's Central Jail. You have not been forgotten, the suicidal Orbina was told. People out there love you.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2000 | Religion News Service
An influx of immigrants from Asia is keeping Canada's three largest cities from turning into enclaves of secularism. A major Statistics Canada survey shows that religious immigrants from Asia have swept into Vancouver, Montreal and Toronto, attending Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Muslim and Christian institutions. About 50% of the Asian immigrants who came to Canada during the 1990s regularly attend religious services, according to the survey by the federal government's official statistics agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1999 | Religion News Service
Large majorities of Americans say they are religious and think spirituality is important, but that doesn't translate into commitment to a single religion or house of worship, a MacArthur Foundation survey has found. More than seven of 10 Americans surveyed said they are religious and consider spirituality to be an important part of their lives. But about half attend religious services less than once a month or never.
OPINION
March 21, 2006
The good men of the cloth are right: L.A. should change the day of the marathon to the Monday of a three-day holiday. This would have two redeeming features: The event would no longer impede hundreds from attending religious services on that day, and it might well keep citizens who would normally drive long distances on a three-day holiday in town, thus cutting down on auto accidents and saving lives. SUNNY COLLINS Santa Monica
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Hector Becerra
Catholic and religiously unaffiliated Latinos overwhelmingly support reelecting President Obama, while only about half of evangelical Latinos do, according to a study by the Pew Hispanic Center released Thursday. Most Latino registered voters support Obama regardless of how often they attend church, but those who reported attending frequently were less likely to support his reelection. Those who never attend religious services favored the president the most, the study found.   The survey, which also found growing support for gay marriage among Latinos, was largely consistent with national polls showing that the fast-growing group - now 24 million eligible voters - backs Obama over Mitt Romney by a 3-1 margin.
OPINION
December 25, 2011
Nearly half a century ago Time magazine famously asked: Is God Dead? The verdict is in. God is definitely not dead — the United States remains a highly religious nation — but God has diversified, and in ways the cheeky headline writers of 1966 couldn't have imagined. We're a spiritually promiscuous nation, increasingly so, and while this is, on balance, a good thing, it also poses certain dangers. It's one thing to explore different faiths, and something else entirely to hop aimlessly from one to another, bolting for the door when the going gets tough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Penny Puckett came to Slab City and fell in love. After four years of "bumming around and hopping freight trains," the 25-year-old from Kansas City arrived at this hardscrabble section of the Imperial Valley desert and immediately embraced its sense of liberation from society's rules and norms. What others might view as desolation and deprivation, Puckett saw as a way to reduce life to its essence: water, food and shelter (plus Internet and cellular phone service). PHOTOS: Slab City "Slab City people have a great need to live with just the bare necessities and are happy about it," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2011 | Mitchell Landsberg
The word "consubstantial" does not roll naturally off the modern American tongue. It's one of those $5 words with Latin roots that tend to make the speaker sound pretentious or, if he trips over it, like a pretentious idiot. Come Sunday, though, consubstantial will become part of the lexicon, at least for the tens of millions of Americans who worship in the Roman Catholic Church. For the first time since 1969, the Catholic Mass in the United States is undergoing significant change, rephrasing some of the best-known prayers in the English language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2008 | Duke Helfand and Raja Abdulrahim, Helfand and Abdulrahim are Times staff writers.
Rabbinical student Jessica Koss paused in front of the mosque and carefully wrapped a turquoise and green scarf around her head so that all her hair was covered. She tied the loose ends into a bun at the back of her neck before entering the Masjid Omar Ibn Al Khattab for the Friday prayer service. With her were two other student members of the Hillel Jewish Center taking part in daylong "getting to know the other" events between Muslim and Jewish student groups at USC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2008 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
During a solemn 10 a.m. Mass at St. John's Cathedral on Sunday, Deacon Lester Mackenzie recited the names and ages of six Americans who had lost their lives in Iraq the previous week. Pray for them, he told the congregation, and for prisoners of war and those missing in action. Then Mackenzie, who is being ordained today as an Episcopal priest, called on parishioners "to pray for the Iraqi people who have died, whose names we do not know." St.
OPINION
June 9, 1985
I would like to give an opposite viewpoint to your editorial. It is precisely because of the principle of separation of church and state that the pastors should have been indicted. As long as clerics stay within their pastoral bounds and provide religious services only, the state should not inject itself into their affairs. But what happens when religious figures enter into secular practices and start performing professional services for which the state requires licensing and for which practitioners can be held liable?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1986 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Only 11% of French adults say they attend religious services regularly, a survey finds. By comparison, 40% of Americans each week attend worship services. Results of the survey by Faits et Opinions, a Paris affiliate of the Gallup polling organization, were released by evangelist Billy Graham in advance of his Mission France crusade starting today.
WORLD
December 26, 2007 | Usama Redha and Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writers
Outside Mar Eliya church, not much had changed since last Christmas: Concrete blocks still surround the building and guards check the IDs of those entering. But inside, hundreds of Iraqi worshipers -- Christians and Muslims -- were crammed into the overflowing Chaldean Catholic church Tuesday, celebrating the holiday and the fact that they felt safe enough to venture out of their homes to attend Christmas Mass.
WORLD
December 25, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Pope Benedict XVI urged the faithful to set aside time in their lives for God and the needy, as he ushered in Christmas early today by celebrating midnight Mass in St. Peter's Basilica. "Man is so preoccupied with himself, he has such urgent need of all the space and all the time for his own things, that nothing remains for others, for his neighbor, for the poor, for God," he said.
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