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NEWS
June 24, 1990 | Joel Sappell and Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writers
The Church of Scientology today is run by a high-school dropout who grew up at the knee of the late L. Ron Hubbard and wields power with the iron-fisted approach of his mentor. At 30, David Miscavige is chairman of the board of an organization that sits atop the bureaucratic labyrinth known as the Church of Scientology. This organization, the Religious Technology Center, owns the trademarks that Scientology churches need to operate, including the words Scientology and Dianetics.
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NEWS
June 24, 1990 | Joel Sappell and Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writers
The Church of Scientology today is run by a high-school dropout who grew up at the knee of the late L. Ron Hubbard and wields power with the iron-fisted approach of his mentor. At 30, David Miscavige is chairman of the board of an organization that sits atop the bureaucratic labyrinth known as the Church of Scientology. This organization, the Religious Technology Center, owns the trademarks that Scientology churches need to operate, including the words Scientology and Dianetics.
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NEWS
December 31, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Church of Scientology paid the Internal Revenue Service $12.5 million in a 1993 settlement that established its tax-exempt status, a church official said. Mark Rathbun, director of the church's Religious Technology Center, confirmed some previously undisclosed details of the 1993 settlement reported in The Wall Street Journal.
NEWS
October 13, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After decades of feuding, the Internal Revenue Service has granted the Church of Scientology and more than 150 of its corporate entities tax-exempt status, ruling that they are charitable, religious organizations entitled to be free from federal income taxes. Marty Rathbun, president of one of the Scientology organizations that received the tax exemptions, said the government sent 30 exemption letters to Scientology groups earlier this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Glendale critic of the Church of Scientology lost a round in federal court Tuesday as a judge declined to lift an order barring him from transmitting copyrighted religious texts onto the Internet. The order remains in effect against Dennis L. Erlich, a former church member. But U. S. District Judge Ronald M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Led by a lawyer brandishing a federal court order and backed up by a pair of off-duty police officers, a handful of Church of Scientology representatives searched a Glendale house Monday and seized hundreds of computer disks and files allegedly containing copyrighted religious texts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Led by a lawyer brandishing a federal court order and backed up by a pair of off-duty police officers, a handful of Church of Scientology representatives searched a Glendale house Monday and seized hundreds of computer disks and files allegedly containing copyrighted religious texts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH
No one would ever accuse the Church of Scientology of not being vigilant about its press coverage, especially when it comes to its famous Hollywood members. One of the latest cases in point was the 2,000-word response in Premiere magazine after a recent story about Scientology's ties to the entertainment industry. This was followed by the publication of a 16-page booklet dubbed "Premiere Propaganda." "Premiere's reporter was not interested in writing a fair story on the church.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2005 | Claire Hoffman and Kim Christensen, Times Staff Writers
Nearly 30 years ago, the Church of Scientology bought a dilapidated and bankrupt resort here and turned the erstwhile haven for Hollywood moguls and starlets into a retreat for L. Ron Hubbard, the science fiction writer who founded the religion.
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