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Relocation Of Industry

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BUSINESS
August 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Toyota Motor Corp. said Wednesday that it will shift production of all its compact pickup trucks sold in the United States to its assembly plant in Northern California, raising the possibility of additional jobs at the Fremont site. Last year, Toyota built 116,000 compact trucks at the Fremont plant and imported another 66,000 from Japan, Toyota spokeswoman Nancy Hubble said.
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BUSINESS
August 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Toyota Motor Corp. said Wednesday that it will shift production of all its compact pickup trucks sold in the United States to its assembly plant in Northern California, raising the possibility of additional jobs at the Fremont site. Last year, Toyota built 116,000 compact trucks at the Fremont plant and imported another 66,000 from Japan, Toyota spokeswoman Nancy Hubble said.
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REAL ESTATE
June 10, 1990 | HERBERT NADEL, Herbert Nadel is chief executive officer and president of the Nadel Partnership, an architectural, planning and interior design firm with offices in Los Angeles, Orange and Sacramento counties
The Southern California real estate development industry will soon undergo the most dramatic changes since the imposition of environmental impact reports in the 1970s. Why? The South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD), under the mandate of the state and federal governments, is determined to improve Southern California's air quality by regulating all significant direct and indirect sources of pollution--including buildings.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By now, the story is painfully familiar. Like so many other industries back in the 1960s, U.S. firms enjoyed a near monopoly in the manufacture of precision bearings, the tiny steel balls that are crucial to the moving parts of everything from aircraft to videocassette players. Along came Japanese competition, and the business virtually dried up in America, which today produces less than 1% of the world's bearings. Even those are made by U.S.-based Japanese plants.
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