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Relocation Of People

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1988 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Like a lot of people, Gerald Harris loves L.A. Even the jolt of being out of work, out of money and out on the streets makes him no more eager to return to his native New York City. "I'm going to stick it out," said Harris, 40, a graphic arts director who became homeless shortly after arriving in Los Angeles four months ago. "There's no point in going back." Social service workers have discovered that a lot of homeless people share Harris' view.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2008 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
For years, Johnson Community Day School has been the second, third or last chance for students kicked out of other middle and high schools. And many have thrived in a setting with small classes, counseling and close supervision to overcome truancy, drug use or brushes with the law. But now Johnson itself is being booted. Next month, the school must vacate its longtime South Los Angeles campus, pushing students already on the edge of failure into a cross-town commute.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1997 | CLAIRE VITUCCI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The court-appointed manager of a bankrupt Reseda nursing home that abruptly evicted its 63 residents Friday night had failed in last-minute negotiations to sell the facility and contends that there was not enough cash to run it even one more day, authorities said Saturday. Two other nursing homes owned by the Scottsdale, Ariz.-based Phoenix Health Group, in Alta Loma and Long Beach, could face closures this week, depending on the outcome of a Monday morning hearing in U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
It's official: Production of ABC's "Ugly Betty" is moving from L.A. to New York. The announcement was made Monday by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Gov. David Paterson and ABC Studios President Mark Pedowitz. They say the show will take advantage of a 35% tax credit from the city and state when it makes the move.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Hong Kong residents desperate to flee before China takes over in 1997, the Federal Republic of Corterra sounded perfect. The tiny Pacific island nation was described as lying between Tahiti and Hawaii, with 80,000 citizens who enjoy democratic government, a British-style legal system and no income tax. Best of all, a newspaper ad here boasted, passports are bargain-priced at only $16,000. Three local businessmen quickly paid the $5,000 application fee. Then they discovered the catch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2008 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
For years, Johnson Community Day School has been the second, third or last chance for students kicked out of other middle and high schools. And many have thrived in a setting with small classes, counseling and close supervision to overcome truancy, drug use or brushes with the law. But now Johnson itself is being booted. Next month, the school must vacate its longtime South Los Angeles campus, pushing students already on the edge of failure into a cross-town commute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2004 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
The neon "Open" sign that blazed at party time has come down from the second-floor balcony. Newport Beach's most boisterous celebrity resident, the one with the multiple body piercing, multiple tattoos and multiple hair colors, is leaving town. Dennis Rodman -- who bought his pinkish-brown, two-story Seashore Drive home in 1996 for $825,000 -- put it on the market for $3.8 million and sold it for cash to an Arizona developer in two days, said Christopher Parr, his real estate agent.
NEWS
January 1, 1998 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to improve medical and psychiatric care in the Los Angeles County jail system, Sheriff Sherman Block announced Wednesday that he will shut down the dilapidated hospital wards in the Men's Central Jail and move hundreds of ill inmates into the new Twin Towers facility.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2006 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
Eight gang members who moved here from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina have been arrested as suspects in 11 slayings, police said Friday. The arrests follow a recent surge in violence in the Houston area, which police attribute partly to Katrina evacuees. A gang unit formed two weeks ago to investigate the crime wave has linked the killings to rival New Orleans gang members trying to get a foothold in Houston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After sit-ins and pickets, seniors at the Huntington Landmark Adult Community won a major court victory Friday in their battle to prevent termite fumigation of their homes. Superior Court Judge Michael H. Brenner ruled that the exterminator used by the community's homeowners' association must switch to heat treatment to kill the termites at the home of Fima Vanoff, 85. The company, Fume Works, had planned to tent the building and use sulfuryl fluoride gas, known by the trade name Vikane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2007 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
More than two months after the immigration detention center on Terminal Island temporarily closed for preventive maintenance and 408 detainees were transferred to other facilities, immigration officials said they have no date set for its reopening and are still assessing the repairs necessary. Meanwhile, immigration judges have approved the government's requests to move the vast majority of the 299 pending cases from San Pedro to other courts around the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2007 | Sharon Bernstein and Paloma Esquivel, Times Staff Writers
California's population continued to grow modestly in the last fiscal year despite a significant exodus of residents to other states, according to a state report released Wednesday. The annual study by the Department of Finance showed that 89,000 more people moved out of California than moved here from elsewhere in the United States. California's population did grow in fiscal 2007 -- but the growth rested on births and the arrival of more than 200,000 immigrants from other countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2007
The buildings are located next door to each other in Chicago, and both have housed the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies, but that's where the similarities end. The institute's old home was a drab, clunky, nearly 100-year-old office building with small rectangular windows. The institute's new home, opening to the public Friday, is a stunning, $55-million facility that features as its facade a 10-story, faceted wall of windows overlooking Grant Park.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2007 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
This coastal resort town is on the front line of a project to gauge support for a mass federal buyout of 17,000 homes near Mississippi's Katrina-ravaged shore. This could become the nation's most significant attempt to radically reconfigure coastal communities -- converting huge swaths of flood-prone residential lots to public wetlands. Until now, the Army Corps of Engineers has reserved buyouts for areas prone to river flooding. Some people, such as Susan I.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2007 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
SACRAMENTO -- Thousands of inmates could soon be reassigned from Los Angeles County jails to home detention to relieve overcrowding, under legislation signed Wednesday by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. "This bill provides local law enforcement with the tools to relieve severe overcrowding in county jails," said Bill Maile, a spokesman for the governor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2007 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
St. John's Regional Medical Center in Oxnard completed the transfer of all its patients this week as it prepares for a long-planned mold fumigation. The hospital's last 17 patients were transferred or discharged Monday evening, officials said. It closed its emergency room Aug. 8. Nine patients were placed at other area hospitals, with about half going to St. John's sister facility in Camarillo. "Everything has gone very smoothly," said Rita O'Connor, the hospital spokeswoman.
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Ring-necked pheasants are back in Detroit. In the tall weeds among the thousands of abandoned buildings and vacant lots in this city, along vast corridors of once-bustling streets--now reduced to urban wilderness--pheasants from the rural brush are flourishing. Nature seems to be reclaiming sections of this city that man is abandoning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1995 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There really wasn't much of an argument as lawyer Ariel Steele sat in her 43rd-floor office overlooking downtown Los Angeles and weighed the merits of the case before her. Would she spend 1996 stranded among piles of briefs and transcripts, battered by a sea of ink and angst? Or would the year be spent on a shimmering, palm-studded island awash in an azure tropical ocean? Steele's verdict was rendered faster than O.J. Simpson's.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2007 | Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writer
Fleetwood Enterprises Inc., the recreational vehicle maker, may shift more than half of its 500-member staff at its Riverside corporate offices to other parts of the country. The company has been struggling with soft sales in its trailer division and is looking for ways to trim costs. One option could be to shift corporate personnel from Riverside to other areas where Fleetwood has factories and costs are lower.
WORLD
July 5, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The first of 700 refugees of the Kunama ethnic group who were displaced by Ethiopia and Eritrea's 1998-2000 border war are being sent to the United States for resettlement, the United Nations refugee agency said. The Kunama people number about 100,000. Their home is in the disputed frontier area between the two African countries.
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