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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1990 | RUTH REICHL
"I don't go to restaurants with names I can't pronounce," said the Reluctant Gourmet when I suggested dinner at I Cugini (ee-coo-GEE-nee). "Especially when they are on the Westside." "You can have pizza," I pleaded. He looked skeptical. "It'll be one of those baby pizzas with skinny crusts and fancy toppings--the kind you have to eat three or four of before you get full," he groused.
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MAGAZINE
October 13, 1996 | Mary Melton
Dressed in his woolen blues and zipper-up boots, Capt. Ken Brady steers his shopping cart down Aisle 6. In his cart are 16 salmon steaks, one pound of shrimp, six red onions, 12 brown onions, three packages of sliced mushrooms, 16 zucchinis, four boxes of wild rice, six tomatoes, four green bell peppers, two bottles of red wine vinaigrette, six cucumbers to mix with some cherry tomatoes "one of the guys grew" for a salad, two gallons of milk and a 22-ounce canister of raisins.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989
Right on, Ruthie! We live in that gastronome's graveyard called the Inland Empire, but unlike letter writer Joy Logie of Riverside (Jan. 29) we eagerly anticipate Reichl's proclamations of such Epicurean Edens as DC 3. If Logie and her Very Reluctant Gourmet wish to cruise through the In & Out, let them have at it. We'll opt for the I-10 to Santa Monica any day. RALPH and COLLEEN FRYE San Bernardino
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1990
Concerning David Sibley's "Restaurant Criticism Requires Substance and Not Triviality" (Counterpunch, Nov. 12), in which Sibley, an owner of Lunaria, criticizes Times restaurant critic Ruth Reichl: I am among the many readers who enjoy Reichl's reviews, as much for the humor as the actual critique. I like hearing what Reichl's guests and the "Reluctant Gourmet" think, because I'm not a food critic. I don't go into spasms of rapture when tasting the perfect truffle (heck, I've never even tasted a truffle)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1989
She's at it again ("The Romance of Dining," by Ruth Reichl, Jan. 22). This time it isn't "serious" food; it's "unfrightening" food. All right, kinder, gentler, I know, but talk about greed: a cheeseburger and fries for $13. This might be frightening to a few folks. I have taken my very reluctant gourmet (VRG) to In & Out when a cheeseburger was in order and he seemed to enjoy it. We didn't have a wine list, there was no airport, Dennis Hopper was nowhere to be seen, but the food was fresh, there was no sand in the lettuce and since there were no kiwis in sight, we weren't frightened, threatened or offended.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1990
Concerning David Sibley's "Restaurant Criticism Requires Substance and Not Triviality" (Counterpunch, Nov. 12), in which Sibley, an owner of Lunaria, criticizes Times restaurant critic Ruth Reichl: I am among the many readers who enjoy Reichl's reviews, as much for the humor as the actual critique. I like hearing what Reichl's guests and the "Reluctant Gourmet" think, because I'm not a food critic. I don't go into spasms of rapture when tasting the perfect truffle (heck, I've never even tasted a truffle)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1988
Perhaps Times restaurant critic Ruth Reichl and her Reluctant Gourmet companion are good people ("Going 4 for 5 at the Plate," July 10). But how can they continue to spend hundreds of dollars a week on restaurant meals and live with their consciences? Surely the article is a savage and subtle parody of rampant materialism. Instead of spending $400 a week on restaurant meals, perhaps Reichl is chiding us to spend one night at home and to contribute the minimum $50 saved to Love Is Feeding Everyone or to one of the many worthy rescue missions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1987
Several months ago Ruth Reichl reviewed a $100 per person dinner at the 7th Street Bistro. I was tempted to write at the time, but didn't get around to it. Her "The Grump Dines Out" (Dec. 21) got me to the typewriter. In regard to the 7th Street Bistro, Reichl expressed concern about what a waiter would think if one ordered the most (or least) expensive item on the menu; then concern about possible embarrassment at the hands of a sommelier if one orders the "wrong wine." May I suggest that these are concerns for insurance salesmen from Peoria, not the clientele of the 7th Street Bistro.
MAGAZINE
October 13, 1996 | Mary Melton
Dressed in his woolen blues and zipper-up boots, Capt. Ken Brady steers his shopping cart down Aisle 6. In his cart are 16 salmon steaks, one pound of shrimp, six red onions, 12 brown onions, three packages of sliced mushrooms, 16 zucchinis, four boxes of wild rice, six tomatoes, four green bell peppers, two bottles of red wine vinaigrette, six cucumbers to mix with some cherry tomatoes "one of the guys grew" for a salad, two gallons of milk and a 22-ounce canister of raisins.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1989
Although Ruth Reichl's comments regarding cuisine are relevant, her running dialogue on the character she calls the Reluctant Gourmet is making me sick! Whether RG is her "significant other," sorority sister, mother-in-law or merely a symbol of everything negative in a dinner partner, I find her observations of RG's behavior boring. If Mr. or Ms. RG is so ornery, Reichl should find a replacement already! PAMELA LECHTMAN Westlake Village
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1990 | RUTH REICHL
"I don't go to restaurants with names I can't pronounce," said the Reluctant Gourmet when I suggested dinner at I Cugini (ee-coo-GEE-nee). "Especially when they are on the Westside." "You can have pizza," I pleaded. He looked skeptical. "It'll be one of those baby pizzas with skinny crusts and fancy toppings--the kind you have to eat three or four of before you get full," he groused.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989
Right on, Ruthie! We live in that gastronome's graveyard called the Inland Empire, but unlike letter writer Joy Logie of Riverside (Jan. 29) we eagerly anticipate Reichl's proclamations of such Epicurean Edens as DC 3. If Logie and her Very Reluctant Gourmet wish to cruise through the In & Out, let them have at it. We'll opt for the I-10 to Santa Monica any day. RALPH and COLLEEN FRYE San Bernardino
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1989
She's at it again ("The Romance of Dining," by Ruth Reichl, Jan. 22). This time it isn't "serious" food; it's "unfrightening" food. All right, kinder, gentler, I know, but talk about greed: a cheeseburger and fries for $13. This might be frightening to a few folks. I have taken my very reluctant gourmet (VRG) to In & Out when a cheeseburger was in order and he seemed to enjoy it. We didn't have a wine list, there was no airport, Dennis Hopper was nowhere to be seen, but the food was fresh, there was no sand in the lettuce and since there were no kiwis in sight, we weren't frightened, threatened or offended.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1988
Perhaps Times restaurant critic Ruth Reichl and her Reluctant Gourmet companion are good people ("Going 4 for 5 at the Plate," July 10). But how can they continue to spend hundreds of dollars a week on restaurant meals and live with their consciences? Surely the article is a savage and subtle parody of rampant materialism. Instead of spending $400 a week on restaurant meals, perhaps Reichl is chiding us to spend one night at home and to contribute the minimum $50 saved to Love Is Feeding Everyone or to one of the many worthy rescue missions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1987
Several months ago Ruth Reichl reviewed a $100 per person dinner at the 7th Street Bistro. I was tempted to write at the time, but didn't get around to it. Her "The Grump Dines Out" (Dec. 21) got me to the typewriter. In regard to the 7th Street Bistro, Reichl expressed concern about what a waiter would think if one ordered the most (or least) expensive item on the menu; then concern about possible embarrassment at the hands of a sommelier if one orders the "wrong wine." May I suggest that these are concerns for insurance salesmen from Peoria, not the clientele of the 7th Street Bistro.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1988
Ruth Reichl's use of the "reluctant gourmet" gimmick is running thin ("Flags on Sunset--a Menu Flutters at Half-Mast," Jan. 31). Obviously, Reichl's culinary credentials are above reproach, but what is the gastronomic background of this sarcastic companion she so liberally quotes? Either the R.G.'s identity should be unmasked or he should be abandoned altogether in order to strengthen the credibility of all future food reviews. KEITH SLOAN Santa Monica
MAGAZINE
November 24, 1996
While I appreciate human interest features highlighting the behind the scenes lives of city employees ("The Reluctant Gourmet," by Mary Melton, So SoCal, Oct. 13), I was taken aback by your use of the hoary and glaring term firemen throughout the article. Melton may not have observed any female firefighters at Station No. 60 in North Hollywood, but there are plenty of them, not only here but all around the country. Isn't it time that the media embraced both the 21st century and the notion of inclusive language?
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