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Rem Koolhaas

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | By David Ng
Dutch starchitect Rem Koolhaas has been tapped to curate one of architecture's most high-profile events -- the Venice Architecture Biennale. Koolhaas will curate the 2014 edition of the Biennale, taking over from British architect David Chipperfield, who directed this year's edition.  Koolhaas' appointment was announced Tuesday by the Biennale's board of directors. Koolhaas heads the Office for Metropolitan Architecture, one of the most prominent architecture firms in the world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By David Ng
Organizers of the Pritzker Architecture Prize - the highest award in the field of architecture - have turned down a request to retroactively honor Denise Scott Brown, whose design partner and husband Robert Venturi received the award in 1991. Peter Palumbo, the current chair of the Pritzker jury, said in a letter that "Pritzker juries, over time, are made up of different individuals.... A later jury cannot reopen or second-guess the work of an earlier jury, and none has ever done so. " The letter, dated June 14, was addressed to the leaders of a group known as Women in Design, at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
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NEWS
December 7, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To make sense of its crowded campus, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art has turned to a Dutchman schooled in Jakarta, Amsterdam and London; a playful thinker who teaches at Harvard and once co-wrote a screenplay for cult film director Russ Meyer; an architect whose works of severe geometry and unconventional materials are found in France, the Netherlands and Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013
The Directors Guild of America on Wednesday announced nominees in the television categories for its annual awards, recognizing the behind-the-scenes talent of shows including "Mad Men" and "Homeland" as well as familiar faces such as Lena Dunham, Louis C.K. and Bryan Cranston. In the drama category, two "Homeland" directors picked up nominations: Michael Cuesta for the second-season finale and Lesli Linka Glatter for the episode "Q&A. " Jennifer Getzinger was nominated for "Mad Men's" fifth-season premiere, "A Little Kiss," while Rian Johnson and Greg Mottola - both directors best known for their film work - earned nods for "Breaking Bad" and "The Newsroom," respectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Scholars of the future puzzling out the differences between New York and Los Angeles will have, among other evidence, the cities' dueling Prada stores. Two and a half years after the opening of Prada SoHo, the first of several "epicenter stores," the Italian fashion house is about to open a serene, mint green and dark wood 24,000-square-foot boutique Friday on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills. The stores are both based on and defined against each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC and LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tear down LACMA? Is that any way to treat Los Angeles' primary art museum? The one that occupies a prime piece of property on mid-Wilshire Boulevard, houses a 100,000-piece art collection and offers the public everything from blockbuster shows to scholarly lectures, film series, jazz nights and family days? A lot of folks seem to think so.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1999 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
All children want to kill their parents, psychologists tell us, but no current architect has picked apart the experiments of an earlier generation more obsessively than Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas. Since publishing his first book, "Delirious New York," in 1978, Koolhaas has reworked--mostly on paper--the history of 20th century Modernism, from the solitary building to the entire metropolis. In the process he has made Modernism's sweeping idealism relevant again.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2000 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Rem Koolhaas, the Dutch architect long considered one of the profession's most revolutionary urban thinkers, has won the 2000 Pritzker Architecture Prize, architecture's highest honor, to be announced today. Among architects, Koolhaas, 56, has become a colossal figure, because of his ability to challenge preconceived notions about the modern metropolis and to reinvigorate architecture's avant-garde.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2007 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
If there is one big idea taking shape in the architecture and design world right now, it's a new strain of humanitarianism. Socially conscious and globally minded, the sensibility is best understood as a thread. It connects green architecture, disaster relief and antipoverty programs, which are engaging many of the profession's top talents -- especially those younger than 40. It runs through blogs and message boards on the Internet. It ties together student projects all over the world.
OPINION
July 3, 2003
I see that Eli Broad's gift to the L.A. County Museum of Art has reignited The Times' carping that the collection of buildings that composes the museum is a "confusing cluster" (editorial, June 28). You people might want to stay away from the Smithsonian in Washington. All those buildings! I mean, where was Rem Koolhaas to help them with one of his multi-zillion-dollar "big-thinking, unifying vision[s]"? Art museums shouldn't have to be laid out like an IKEA store. Anyone who is too confused on how to find the art at LACMA is probably too stupid to appreciate it anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | By David Ng
Dutch starchitect Rem Koolhaas has been tapped to curate one of architecture's most high-profile events -- the Venice Architecture Biennale. Koolhaas will curate the 2014 edition of the Biennale, taking over from British architect David Chipperfield, who directed this year's edition.  Koolhaas' appointment was announced Tuesday by the Biennale's board of directors. Koolhaas heads the Office for Metropolitan Architecture, one of the most prominent architecture firms in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Eli Broad is a little further along in his plans for a downtown museum than you might have guessed. Even as he continues to negotiate with city and county officials and with representatives of developer Related Cos. about building a museum to hold his collection of postwar and contemporary art on Bunker Hill, the billionaire philanthropist and his chief of staff, Gerun Riley, have been running an invited architectural competition for the project....
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009 | By Christopher Hawthorne architecture critic >>>
Architecture, arguably for the first time in its history, found itself at the very center of American cultural and political life in the decade that is wrapping up. That centrality helped make stars out of architecture's top talents. With the aid of powerful software, adventuresome clients and, not least, a flood of new wealth and easy financing, it also produced a rush of inventive buildings, in styles stretching from fluid to wildly sculptural to neomodern. But the notion that architects had suddenly acquired more power than ever before, as opposed to more visibility, opportunity or cachet, turned out to be hollow.
WORLD
February 10, 2009 | Barbara Demick
On a night when millions of Chinese revelers set off fireworks for the end of the Lunar New Year, one display Monday night sent a 44-story hotel up in flames, killing a firefighter and injuring 30 other people. The dramatically angled building designed by Dutch architects Rem Koolhaas and Ole Scheeren was part of a new headquarters complex for CCTV, scheduled to open later this year. The main part of the center, shaped like trousers, did not appear to be damaged.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
At his blog Hello Beautiful!, architecture writer and public radio fixture Edward Lifson has been asking the following question: "If Barack Obama were a building, what building would Barack Obama be?" In response, one of his readers suggested Steven Holl's spare, luminous 2007 addition to the Nelson-Atkins Museum in Kansas City, Mo. ("not flashy, but . . . new and fresh"). Another nominated the 2004 main branch of the Seattle Public Library by Rem Koolhaas and the Office for Metropolitan Architecture ("forward-looking, intelligent, jazzy, cool")
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2009 | Christopher Hawthorne, Architecture Critic
When it comes to describing the lives of cities, big crowds can be unreliable narrators. They come together, after all, only in moments that are by definition out of the ordinary. Measuring the character of an American city -- or, trickier yet, the character of American urbanism -- by the size or behavior of a popular mass is a bit like making up your mind about a person based entirely on how he conducts himself at weddings, funerals and high school reunions. And yet I found myself drawn this week to Washington, joining at least 1 million other Americans making a midwinter, mid-recession pilgrimage, precisely by the idea that the masses of people filling the capital this week say something meaningful about how cities and our conception of public space might change during Barack Obama's presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2002
Once again, the emperor has no clothes. The cover story on architect Michael Maltzan's career success by Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff ("Drafting a Career," June 23) accepts at face value that the work for which he has built his reputation and success is even worth noting. Ouroussoff and the wider architecture and art communities and their supporters seem devoid of the ability to apply simple empiricism. Collectively, the work of Maltzan, Rem Koolhaas, Frank Gehry and others in their artistic camp manifest little more than gimmicky concoctions of soulless geometric forms and a lot of pretentious explanatory discourse about their meaning.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2003 | Diane Haithman
In another example of cultural belt-tightening, Manhattan's Whitney Museum of American Art confirmed Tuesday that it will scrap its plans to build an expansion, designed by Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas, due to financial problems. The ambitious project, which unofficial estimates have pegged at $200 million, will be jettisoned as the museum seeks instead to build its $45-million endowment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2008 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
Though it won't be finished for another year or so, the China Central Television headquarters, designed by Rem Koolhaas and Ole Scheeren of the Dutch firm Office for Metropolitan Architecture, is already a jaw-dropping sight. A giant Mobius strip of a skyscraper, CCTV consists of two leaning towers, each 51 stories high, connected by a pair of cantilevered arms.
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