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June 1, 2003 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
Michael Stipe is in such a good mood on this afternoon in the recording studio that he probably wouldn't mind if you gave his shaved head an affectionate noogie. It's a side of him -- and the band -- that you don't normally see in photographs or even on stage, where the earnestness of the music defines the tone. When one of the musicians who'll be accompanying the band on tour this summer hits a wrong note, Stipe laughs so hard that guitarist Peter Buck and bassist Mike Mills also break up.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2004 | MTV News
R.E.M. will kick off a 29-date tour of North America on Oct. 13 in Los Angeles, after the band has finished its Vote for Change anti-Bush fundraising tour with Bruce Springsteen and Bright Eyes. The group's 13th studio album, "Around the Sun," will go on sale Oct. 5. The politically active band has said that one of the songs on the album, "I'm Gonna DJ," was inspired by the 1999 World Trade Organization riots in Seattle. R.E.M.'s last album, "Reveal," came out in 2001.
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NEWS
August 25, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
R.E.M., the hottest free agent in the music business, signed a five-album contract Saturday with Warner Bros. Records worth an estimated $80 million--the largest recording contract ever awarded, sources said. The Grammy-winning band's deal surpassed the $70-million mark achieved seven months ago by pop diva Janet Jackson as well as other mega-deals by such superstars as Michael Jackson and Madonna, whose six-album pacts included film and joint venture record label components.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2003 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
Michael Stipe is in such a good mood on this afternoon in the recording studio that he probably wouldn't mind if you gave his shaved head an affectionate noogie. It's a side of him -- and the band -- that you don't normally see in photographs or even on stage, where the earnestness of the music defines the tone. When one of the musicians who'll be accompanying the band on tour this summer hits a wrong note, Stipe laughs so hard that guitarist Peter Buck and bassist Mike Mills also break up.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2004 | MTV News
R.E.M. will kick off a 29-date tour of North America on Oct. 13 in Los Angeles, after the band has finished its Vote for Change anti-Bush fundraising tour with Bruce Springsteen and Bright Eyes. The group's 13th studio album, "Around the Sun," will go on sale Oct. 5. The politically active band has said that one of the songs on the album, "I'm Gonna DJ," was inspired by the 1999 World Trade Organization riots in Seattle. R.E.M.'s last album, "Reveal," came out in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chatting on the phone with Mike Mills, one gets the impression he could have climbed as high on the corporate ladder as he has playing for R.E.M., one of the most important, successful, long-lived and consistently rewarding rock bands of the past 20 years. He's smooth and personable without coming off as oily. He knows how to stay "on message" as a spokesman for his concern's interests, and he makes his points clearly and confidently. Of course, if R.E.M.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2001 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crowd was tiny, the box office nonexistent and the performance fleeting, but R.E.M. came to Los Angeles on Friday to play its music and deliver a message: We're not done yet. "This is a new band," guitarist Peter Buck said of the 21-year-old outfit. "We're old guys, but this is a new band and I feel real positive about the new album and where we're going." Buck and company had just finished recording a five-song show for KCRW-FM (89.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1994 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic.
The Globe, a corner bar with the cozy informality of a '60s coffeehouse, may be the only collegiate hangout in America where the members of R.E.M. don't cause a stir. Lead singer Michael Stipe, 34, is a special target because his lyrics offer a comfort and kinship that attract rock fans to him and the other members of the band. In Athens, however, where the quartet has been based since the early '80s, fans pride themselves on respecting the musicians' right to a degree of normalcy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' Pop Music Critic.
Rock Losing Its Grip as Other Genres Gain. That recent headline on a Billboard magazine article documenting rock's dwindling share of the pop album market was sobering, but it wasn't unexpected. It has been clear for some time now that rock is no longer the creative heart of pop music. Rather than reflect the imagination and daring that it did in past decades, most rock deals shamelessly in hollow or recycled gestures--and all too often represents nothing more than casual entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, Chris Willman is a regular contributor to The Times.
L ike most of the group's earlier album titles, R.E.M.'s new "Out of Time" has any number of possible meanings--the most ironic and self-deprecating one being that perhaps the quartet from Georgia thinks its salad days of being recognized as the great American alternative rock 'n' roll band are past. In the early and mid '80s, R.E.M.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2001 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crowd was tiny, the box office nonexistent and the performance fleeting, but R.E.M. came to Los Angeles on Friday to play its music and deliver a message: We're not done yet. "This is a new band," guitarist Peter Buck said of the 21-year-old outfit. "We're old guys, but this is a new band and I feel real positive about the new album and where we're going." Buck and company had just finished recording a five-song show for KCRW-FM (89.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chatting on the phone with Mike Mills, one gets the impression he could have climbed as high on the corporate ladder as he has playing for R.E.M., one of the most important, successful, long-lived and consistently rewarding rock bands of the past 20 years. He's smooth and personable without coming off as oily. He knows how to stay "on message" as a spokesman for his concern's interests, and he makes his points clearly and confidently. Of course, if R.E.M.
NEWS
August 25, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
R.E.M., the hottest free agent in the music business, signed a five-album contract Saturday with Warner Bros. Records worth an estimated $80 million--the largest recording contract ever awarded, sources said. The Grammy-winning band's deal surpassed the $70-million mark achieved seven months ago by pop diva Janet Jackson as well as other mega-deals by such superstars as Michael Jackson and Madonna, whose six-album pacts included film and joint venture record label components.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1994 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic.
The Globe, a corner bar with the cozy informality of a '60s coffeehouse, may be the only collegiate hangout in America where the members of R.E.M. don't cause a stir. Lead singer Michael Stipe, 34, is a special target because his lyrics offer a comfort and kinship that attract rock fans to him and the other members of the band. In Athens, however, where the quartet has been based since the early '80s, fans pride themselves on respecting the musicians' right to a degree of normalcy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, Chris Willman is a regular contributor to The Times.
L ike most of the group's earlier album titles, R.E.M.'s new "Out of Time" has any number of possible meanings--the most ironic and self-deprecating one being that perhaps the quartet from Georgia thinks its salad days of being recognized as the great American alternative rock 'n' roll band are past. In the early and mid '80s, R.E.M.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' Pop Music Critic.
Rock Losing Its Grip as Other Genres Gain. That recent headline on a Billboard magazine article documenting rock's dwindling share of the pop album market was sobering, but it wasn't unexpected. It has been clear for some time now that rock is no longer the creative heart of pop music. Rather than reflect the imagination and daring that it did in past decades, most rock deals shamelessly in hollow or recycled gestures--and all too often represents nothing more than casual entertainment.
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