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Remarkable Life

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
South African musician Johnny Clegg, who saluted Nelson Mandela in his 1987 song “Asimbonanga” while Mandela was still serving prison time for fighting the nation's apartheid system, released the following statement about Mandela's passing on Thursday: “My family and I send our condolences to all the Mandela family members on the passing of Tata. We also share with all South Africans and the global community our sense of loss and sadness at his passing. “Nelson Mandela will always define a deep part of what and who are as individuals and as a nation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
South African musician Johnny Clegg, who saluted Nelson Mandela in his 1987 song “Asimbonanga” while Mandela was still serving prison time for fighting the nation's apartheid system, released the following statement about Mandela's passing on Thursday: “My family and I send our condolences to all the Mandela family members on the passing of Tata. We also share with all South Africans and the global community our sense of loss and sadness at his passing. “Nelson Mandela will always define a deep part of what and who are as individuals and as a nation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010 | Steve Lopez
Richard J. Bing of La Cañada Flintridge got good and mad at his power company last month and fired off a letter to the editor to share his tale of woe. "I know injustice when I see it," said Bing, whose venting was made all the more impressive by his age. "I am a retired, 100-year-old physician. " If I were so lucky as to ever see 100, I'd want it to be like this — still throwing punches. I called Bing, who explained in a German accent that SoCal Edison cut off power in his neighborhood Aug. 2 to make repairs.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
How do you introduce a batch of letters on Nelson Mandela? By being as brief as possible. What can be said about the dozens of letters on the anti-apartheid revolutionary's death Thursday is that they all eulogize the late South African president with effusive admiration. There are no revisionist histories, no "yeah, but" contrarians. Some do get political, but almost all speak of Mandela's universally admired qualities and remarkable life. Manhattan Beach resident Charles Reilly notes Mandela's magnanimity: "Mandela was a great leader and an inspirational figure to people across the planet.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The Huston Smith Reader Edited with an introduction by Jeffery Paine University of California Press: 280 pp., $29.95 A restless curiosity about the sacred dimensions of life drove Huston Smith to seek enlightenment in a Zen monastery in Japan, join a secret Muslim fraternity, make pilgrimages to Himalayan holy sites and investigate the religious import of mind-altering plants. These experiences also propelled Smith through six decades of scholarly analysis that has made him one of the world's most important writers and thinkers on religions of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2000
Geoff Boucher examines the remarkable life of Moby's album "Play" and the unusual route it took to become a success.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
How do you introduce a batch of letters on Nelson Mandela? By being as brief as possible. What can be said about the dozens of letters on the anti-apartheid revolutionary's death Thursday is that they all eulogize the late South African president with effusive admiration. There are no revisionist histories, no "yeah, but" contrarians. Some do get political, but almost all speak of Mandela's universally admired qualities and remarkable life. Manhattan Beach resident Charles Reilly notes Mandela's magnanimity: "Mandela was a great leader and an inspirational figure to people across the planet.
BOOKS
March 10, 1996
Regarding Joseph Giovannini's review of Michael Cannell's "I.M. Pei: Mandarin of Modernism" (Feb. 18): As someone who has a background similar to that of Pei (graduated from the same university in China, emigrated to the United States during the same period), I have followed Pei's career with great interest and am quite proud of what he has accomplished in his adopted country. This biography, being written by a non-architect, is meant to chronicle the highlights of a remarkable life and little else.
OPINION
March 2, 2006
Thank you for the article on the life of former Los Angeles Times Publisher Otis Chandler (obituary, Feb. 28), a fascinating glimpse into the world of this prominent and accomplished man. The accounting of Chandler's life in the historical context of Los Angeles in those days was outstanding; the reader got a real sense of the enormous significance of the transformation of The Times under his leadership and its effect on the city as a whole....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1994
Regarding "The Old Man and the Boy: a Father-Son Bond Grows," June 19: What heartwarming story! In a wonderful contrast to the daily grind and tragedy that occurs, Leon T. Graves' remarkable life makes me proud to be human. At the same time, his example in adopting and raising Roy Chung should make us all ashamed for not doing more, not only in terms of money, but in terms of compassion. Here's to seeing more coverage of this type of "real" news. It's almost irrelevant that Graves is black and Chung is Korean, but all the more enlightening for those of us who live in this city.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The Huston Smith Reader Edited with an introduction by Jeffery Paine University of California Press: 280 pp., $29.95 A restless curiosity about the sacred dimensions of life drove Huston Smith to seek enlightenment in a Zen monastery in Japan, join a secret Muslim fraternity, make pilgrimages to Himalayan holy sites and investigate the religious import of mind-altering plants. These experiences also propelled Smith through six decades of scholarly analysis that has made him one of the world's most important writers and thinkers on religions of the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2011 | Steve Lopez
I get lots of mail from inmates proclaiming their innocence, but early last month I got a letter from an 88-year-old Marina del Rey man confessing to a crime. A minor crime, to be sure. Petty theft. But it was a crime against my family, and it was committed roughly 77 years ago. Henry "Hank" Cervantes saw in a column that I grew up in the little fishing and industrial town of Pittsburg, near San Francisco. So he wondered if, by chance, I was related to the people who ran the Lopez market on Black Diamond Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010 | Steve Lopez
Richard J. Bing of La Cañada Flintridge got good and mad at his power company last month and fired off a letter to the editor to share his tale of woe. "I know injustice when I see it," said Bing, whose venting was made all the more impressive by his age. "I am a retired, 100-year-old physician. " If I were so lucky as to ever see 100, I'd want it to be like this — still throwing punches. I called Bing, who explained in a German accent that SoCal Edison cut off power in his neighborhood Aug. 2 to make repairs.
HOME & GARDEN
May 8, 2010 | Chris Erskine
At our house, every day is Mother's Day. That's just the way we roll. The morning begins with the arrival of trumpeter swans, who lay their eggs on satin pillows in the kitchen. That's breakfast. Generally, my wife, Posh, prefers her swan eggs scrambled and served over little tufts of caviar. We farm our own caviar these days — in the end, it's cheaper. For that, we keep a beluga sturgeon in the master bath. "Wow, your beluga is really getting big," house guests are always saying.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Breath Made Visible" is an admiring documentary portrait of Anna Halprin, a woman so remarkable it is hard to fit her into the confines of a film, let alone a sentence. Born in 1920, Halprin is the doyenne of avant-garde, experimental dance in this country, but to say dancing is her life is to both understate her passion and neglect all the other things that concern her and make her as much a natural force as a performer. During her more than 50-year career, Halprin, who still teaches twice a week on the Marin County redwood deck her landscape-architect husband, Lawrence Halprin, had built for her, has touched any number of bases.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey, FILM CRITIC
History can weigh heavily on a filmmaker, and that is what happens with "Amelia," a disappointing rendering of the remarkable life of Amelia Earhart. The pioneering aviatrix lost in flight is a figure so iconic, and director Mira Nair so tentative with her legend, that all the reverence and tiptoeing around grounds a film that should have soared. The life of Earhart, who burst on the scene in 1928 flying airplanes when they were still the province of men, is exactly the sort of saga Nair loves to tell.
OPINION
January 9, 2004
Re "Driver Who Killed 10 Is Charged," Jan. 6: The deaths of the people at the Santa Monica Farmers' Market as well as the fate of the driver is tragic. In the desire for accountability, real culpability may be better placed with lawmakers and Department of Motor Vehicles officials, who should set standards and means of enforcement regarding the revocation of licenses for elderly people with diminishing facilities. This horrible event should be raising a much larger issue than who was at fault on that particular day. This is a true public safety concern that must be dealt with in a broad manner.
HOME & GARDEN
May 8, 2010 | Chris Erskine
At our house, every day is Mother's Day. That's just the way we roll. The morning begins with the arrival of trumpeter swans, who lay their eggs on satin pillows in the kitchen. That's breakfast. Generally, my wife, Posh, prefers her swan eggs scrambled and served over little tufts of caviar. We farm our own caviar these days — in the end, it's cheaper. For that, we keep a beluga sturgeon in the master bath. "Wow, your beluga is really getting big," house guests are always saying.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2006 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
The Librettist of Venice The Remarkable Life of Lorenzo Da Ponte: Mozart's Poet, Casanova's Friend, and Italian Opera Impresario in America Rodney Bolt Bloomsbury: 430 pp., $29.95 * AS the subtitle of Robert Bolt's engaging biography "The Librettist of Venice" suggests, Lorenzo Da Ponte (1749-1838) had a life as filled with improbable reversals as the plot of one of his operas.
OPINION
March 2, 2006
Thank you for the article on the life of former Los Angeles Times Publisher Otis Chandler (obituary, Feb. 28), a fascinating glimpse into the world of this prominent and accomplished man. The accounting of Chandler's life in the historical context of Los Angeles in those days was outstanding; the reader got a real sense of the enormous significance of the transformation of The Times under his leadership and its effect on the city as a whole....
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